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  • #16
    What is the cutter made from?

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    • #17
      What is the cutter made from?
      A2 tool steel.
      "The truth is incontrovertible, malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end; there it is." Winston Churchill

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      • #18
        Did you cut a straight worm drive and feed the cutter into it to get the curve?
        Wow... where did the time go. I could of swore I was only out there for an hour.

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        • #19
          Bee-yoo-ti-ful!

          Please do post pics of the tooling. This kind of stuff fascinates me.
          Milton

          "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

          "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

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          • #20
            Very nice 3jaw!
            Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

            Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
            Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
            Monarch 10EE 1942

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            • #21
              Nice Job!

              You mentioned the following and I'm rather curious which way you went. Guessing you made the cutter on the mill since it is a square tooth, but how did you end up doing it.

              I'd think chasing the spiral on the worm is necessary similar to gashing a gear would be, this correct?

              Thanks,
              - Reed
              Raleigh, NC

              I plan on making it as original as possible. I had thought of the rotating toolpost geared to the spindle idea as a last resort, but I have another idea that is practically identical to your second suggestion. Instead of cutting a straight worm and using that to make the cutter, I am thinking of making the cutter on the mill using a dividing head and a single point fly cutter ground to the proper geometry, adding some clearance angles, then hardening and sharpening. I do like your idea of cutting a straight worm first and using that as a "cutter to make a cutter", though.

              Originally posted by 3jaw
              A2 tool steel.

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              • #22
                nice results, creative thinking. i love jobs like that. .

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Tinkerer
                  Did you cut a straight worm drive and feed the cutter into it to get the curve?
                  That's it in a nutshell. I determined through measuring the original that a 7 TPI worm would be close enough to the circular pitch of the cutter to get it started. I cut the worm 0.040 deep with a tool ground the same as the tooth form of the circular cutter, then I switched to the circular cutter and finished the worm. I had to go very slowly and use lots of cutting oil.

                  The cutter teeth were made on a vertical mill with a right angle angle attachment and a "spin-dex" fixture set at the helix angle of the worm. This is also the same setup used to cut the gears. I made a fly cutter to hold the cutting tool. The cutting tool was held at the correct angle in a grinding vise with an angle block that I had to make and then mounted the vise on a sine plate and ground on a surface grinder. I had to make the angle block and use the grinding vise since I don't have a compound sine plate.

                  The whole thing was a leap of faith since I wasn't sure my idea would work but, to my relief, it did work just like I had planned.

                  I don't think I'll take on any more challenges for a little while!!!
                  Last edited by 3jaw; 03-16-2009, 09:53 AM.
                  "The truth is incontrovertible, malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end; there it is." Winston Churchill

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