Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Vacuums for metal swarf

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Vacuums for metal swarf

    "Vacuum is the newer tech but quite pricey as the typical shop vac ain’t going to deliver the cfm needed to make a good show of it."

    Above was posted by JoeFin in a reply to a post about aluminum swarf galling on end mills.

    Not wanting to hijack that thread...

    Wondering if anyone could fill in the blanks about what "is" needed. What sort of cfm (could a lack be compensated by using a smaller nozzle - yes, it increases the velocity but not the cfm), how to protect the paper air filter from a death of a thousand cuts, and what happens in the container: after all, there is a gooey mess of various metals, cutting fluids, etc.

  • #2
    CFM? I could not even venture a guess without a bit of trial and error. However, they do make a canister that can be added between the vac and the point were the chips enter the hose. The idea is that when the chips get into the first can they fall to the bottom and the vac continues at the top. A separator of sorts.


    Click for larger photo.



    rock~
    Last edited by rockrat; 12-31-2008, 11:45 AM.
    Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Dunc
      "Vacuum is the newer tech but quite pricey as the typical shop vac ain’t going to deliver the cfm needed to make a good show of it."

      Above was posted by JoeFin in a reply to a post about aluminum swarf galling on end mills.

      Not wanting to hijack that thread...

      Wondering if anyone could fill in the blanks about what "is" needed. What sort of cfm (could a lack be compensated by using a smaller nozzle - yes, it increases the velocity but not the cfm), how to protect the paper air filter from a death of a thousand cuts, and what happens in the container: after all, there is a gooey mess of various metals, cutting fluids, etc.
      The best approach is a cyclone to knock down the fluid and swarf before the bag filter. I managed to find a packaged one in a Dyson (which have a high CFM) SWMBO was throwing out. I use the down the back of sofa nozzle. You can easily make a cyclone front end for a standard shop vacuum which was my plan before the dyson fell into my lap.

      A simple cyclone is just a special version of what rockrat has, but with a specific inlet and out design so that the gas swirls around and exits from the centre.
      Last edited by derekm; 12-31-2008, 11:52 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        my shop vac works great its a cheap 5 gallon one i got for 5 bucks at a yard sale.
        i never had an isse with the paper filter getting all cut up , but the elastic that holds the paper filter on finelly broke so i gave up- and use it as is ..
        it still has the sponge screen on it and seems to be just fine.

        been using this shop vac for a few years now suckingup metal and all kinds of stuff and its still running so iam not to worried about it ,, my next shop vac is going to be a job mate one just for that simple fact iam over run with tools in my shop that are now hangin off my celing so i need a more complact shop vac now untill i can afford to build a larger shop..

        if you got holes in the hose thats going to ruduce the power alot try a new hose if you gota problem might just help also i always take long and med strings out of the way before takeing the vac to it all other wise it clogs up the hose alot

        Comment


        • #5
          Dunc. I don't know ,but I use my dayton 10 gal. shop vac to suck up plastic and laminate swarf on the mill as I'm milling. I does a great job with the smog as well. I have a nozzle attachment which I think you can still get from Grainger. It is a nozzle that goes from the diameter of the hose and tapers down to about a half an inch. Very useful for getting the swarf out of the T-Slots. it seems to incrase the velocity. Maybe that would help.

          Comment


          • #6
            My floor is asbestos tiles. No vacuum for me. A pinhole in the filter and whatever asbestos dust is there gets ejected at 10000000 mph.

            I really need to paint it, or something.

            Comment


            • #7
              Ishamura made a cyclone. Check it out.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm going to make my own seperator with a 5 gallon pale

                Comment


                • #9
                  This seems to work quite well

                  http://www.cgallery.com/jpthien/cy.htm

                  Regards Ian
                  You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If you're thinking of a central dust collection system to serve several machine tools with permanently connected duct I'd reccommend against it. It would be a mantenence nightmare because of the down time necessary to clear clogs. However a box store shop vac serving an individual machine is a real time saver especially if you make a chip pickup easy attached (and detached) at the cutter positioned to snuff up chips as they are generated.

                    Also have a length of electrical conduit handy to poke through the hose when needed.

                    I've had a shop vac at my milling machine for 20 years and it's one of the best time and hassle savers I've ever made. It's a cheap Sears vac dedicated for the mil. I never use compressed air on the machine except for clearing blind holes. I pick up all the chips (except twisty drill chips) with the vac. Saves time. Vac = handle chips once. Air = handle chips twice: blow off/scatter chips; sweep up chips/clean machine.

                    One thing. Never use a chip vac for general dust pick up. Once the filter begins to plug the suction CFM halves and reduces its effectiveness for chips. Buy one and dedicate it for chip pick up.

                    A tip. You will reduce number of clogs if you routinely fluff the chips as they are vaccumed up. A stream of individual chips will flow down the hose. A clump may snag. Clumps equals clogs.
                    Last edited by Forrest Addy; 12-31-2008, 03:49 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Tony. There is less than 1% of asbestos in those tiles and that is encapsulated. I found this out after I paid a company to remove 2500 square feet of tile from a shop floor. Afterwards I talked to several environmental engineers who told me that asbestos abatement of floor tiles was a great scam.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Forrest Addy
                        A tip. You will reduce number of clogs if you routinely fluff the chips as they are vaccumed up.
                        just what my shop needs, a dedicated fluffer. i already have one in my house.

                        andy b.
                        The danger is not that computers will come to think like men - but that men will come to think like computers. - some guy on another forum not dedicated to machining

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I found a quick release magnet a big help with longer ferrous chips, $13.50 from Lee Valley. http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.a...363,42356&ap=1

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I picked up the type Robin R shows at Harbor Freight ($3.90) IIRC. They don't seem to have that version online now (at least I didn't find it) but they do have this long reach one that I'm sure will be handy - gotta get me one!

                            http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=93950

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by andy_b
                              just what my shop needs, a dedicated fluffer. i already have one in my house.

                              andy b.

                              mine has become less and less dedicated over the years, to the point of total indifference.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X