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  • #16
    My bother has a mill at his work I could use however he lives two hours away.

    There you go. You have just answered your own question.
    A 2 hour drive is well worth it.
    You need to drill 1 inch holes into two 1/2 inch plates at the same time using the plates mounted on a milling machine and put it in backgear. This will give you the needed slow speed and more importantly, the needed torque to get the holes drilled easily. I would never use a drill press for this exercise myself, if I had access to a mill. (for the record, I do own my own Bridgeport and drill press)
    Just my opinion of course.............pg

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    • #17
      Second post in the thread..."but nothing under $4000 is going to do the trick"

      Guess it's all in how you read the posts..

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      • #18
        Originally posted by chrisb
        Second post in the thread..."but nothing under $4000 is going to do the trick"

        Guess it's all in how you read the posts..
        I'm sure he meant *new* prices but I can see now how you reached the conclusion you reached...I thought you were referring to the $4,500 Alzmetall that I offered...mea culpa

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        • #19
          Gotta love the internet. I was over on a gun forum and a guy asked what hand gun is best for home defense. Folks kept on replying with bigger and biger guns until they told poor guy he should have an Uzzi under his pillow.


          To answer your question, the mill idea sounds good.

          But if you want to buy a dp, there are tons of nice old American dp's out there, often with 1hp+ motors, and power downfeed. If they aren't slow enough for you, wire up a vfd. Since 1" holes will be occasional for you, a nice heavy 17" or so Delta or the like with proper feed, speed, fluid, and work clamping would be fine mixed with some smarts when you are doing it.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by piniongear
            My bother has a mill at his work I could use however he lives two hours away.

            There you go. You have just answered your own question.
            Yes and No...

            The Bosses father (that owns everything) is one that can get a knot in his knickers over something that he didn't give a hoot about yesterday. I'd prefer to avoid that option for that reason. The guy wouldn't say a word while I'm there just make my brothers life miserable the next day.

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            • #21
              This is about the smallest machine around that will handle a 1" drill in steel-

              http://grizzly.com/products/12-Speed...ll-Press/G7948

              $691 including frieght.

              #4 MT and nearly 400lbs it will run a 1" bit in steel.

              Now if you need to drill 1" holes 7 days a week,then something bigger is needed.
              I just need one more tool,just one!

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              • #22
                Originally posted by aboard_epsilon
                i would like to see you turn 400 rpm, on a one inch drill, on a cheap chinese drill press, with no flood coolant or power downfeed.....it would be toast at 200 rpm............that's if it didnt vibrate its self out of the morse taper.

                all the best.markj
                I have been following this thread for a bit and I agree with AB here.
                Any drill press made in China, and most of them made in the US for that matter will chatter like nothing you have ever seen with a 1 inch drill bit drilling 1 inch thick steel plate at 300 rpms.
                So, if tickets are available to see that show I will take one please.
                When I drill plate with anything larger than a 5/8 inch bit I do it on the mill, not the drill press.
                And the mill is running in back gear also, turning perhaps 50 rpm. The result is the bit takes a large bite into the steel as it slowly turns. The chip is a continuous spiral of metal coming out of the hole as it is produced.
                No chatter, no smoke or noise, just a nice round hole produced. If I tried this on my 15 inch Rockwell/Delta industrial drill press turning 300 rpms the thing would chatter so much that it would probably loosen the chuck arbor. Either that or the bit would stick in the hole and I would spend 15 minutes getting it unstuck. The mill is the only way to go if you have to drill a large hole in thick steel plate..........pg

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                • #23
                  If you are not trying to drill a 1" hole in 1" steel, a couple of nice used drill presses to watch out for that can fall in your price range are the Clausings, the older Deltas, and older Powermatics. I have a 15" variable speed floor standing Clausing and it is sweet. Another board member bought a beautiful benchtop Clausing that would fit in your budget, the thing looks brand new. Years back I had an "Industrial Duty" Craftsman from the 70's, and it was a pos, so I would stick with a real brand if possible.

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                  • #24
                    Older Clausings are able to go up to 1", and may have a minimum speed only in the area of 250 RPM. But they came with at least a 1 HP motor.

                    They might chatter when starting, but quiet down when the drill is in the hole..... I have only had to go to about 0.750" with mine, but it does work.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by piniongear
                      I have been following this thread for a bit and I agree with AB here.
                      Any drill press made in China, and most of them made in the US for that matter will chatter like nothing you have ever seen with a 1 inch drill bit drilling 1 inch thick steel plate at 300 rpms.
                      So, if tickets are available to see that show I will take one please.
                      When I drill plate with anything larger than a 5/8 inch bit I do it on the mill, not the drill press.
                      And the mill is running in back gear also, turning perhaps 50 rpm. The result is the bit takes a large bite into the steel as it slowly turns. The chip is a continuous spiral of metal coming out of the hole as it is produced.
                      No chatter, no smoke or noise, just a nice round hole produced. If I tried this on my 15 inch Rockwell/Delta industrial drill press turning 300 rpms the thing would chatter so much that it would probably loosen the chuck arbor. Either that or the bit would stick in the hole and I would spend 15 minutes getting it unstuck. The mill is the only way to go if you have to drill a large hole in thick steel plate..........pg
                      I'm curious, do you pilot drill, and what size? I tend to drill about the width of the drill web for stuff like that, but I don't do it often. The VFD on my Rockwell 17" will get the speed down pretty low without cogging.
                      Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                      • #26
                        Powermatic 1150 and 1150A drill presses seem to sell for 250 - 400 bucks, in good usable condition. These are good quality, general purpose drill presses that will probably do what you need done. Parts are available, new or used. Be sure to use SHARP drill bits.

                        Where are you located?

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