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New flash! Richard Carlstedt is the 2009 Metalworking Craftsman of the Year winner

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  • New flash! Richard Carlstedt is the 2009 Metalworking Craftsman of the Year winner

    Here is the press release about Sherlines 2009 award winner.

    Richard Carlstedt of Green Bay, Wisconsin is the 13th winner of the Joe Martin Foundation for Exceptional Craftsmanship’s top annual award. As a manufacturing engineer, precision metalworking has been a part of his life for many years, and in his own home shop those high standards carry over into his personal projects.
    As a kid he built model airplanes, once building six straight stick and balsa models of the WWI Spad biplane fighter until he got it just right. At age 11 he built a powered model of the Union ironclad ship the USS Monitor. Interest in that ship would follow him through life, and that early determination to get it “just right” has paid off in a world class project.
    A little about Richard Carlstedt’s career
    Richard studied pre-engineering in high school and worked as an apprentice machinist at Ford Aircraft to make money for college, hoping to get an aeronautical engineering degree. Once in college he changed that to mechanical engineering when he was told only graduates from MIT or Cal-Poly actually end up working in the wind tunnel. Finances eventually ended his college days and he went to work in construction to support a young family. He went back to the metal working trades and worked his way up from mechanic/machinist into management. During this time, he continued to attend night school with aspirations of a degree. On assignment in Canada in 1971, he met some friends who were live steam addicts and joined the Ontario Sun Parlor Lines steam club where he built his first steam engine—a Stuart Turner 7. He returned to Chicago four years later and joined the Chicago Model Engineers where he learned from experts like Emery Ohlenkamp, and Roy Ozuf as well as his own father-in-law, a retired tool and die maker.
    After working for ten years in Northern California in a manufacturing engineering capacity he returned to Detroit to take the Society of Manufacturing Engineers test, which he passed to become certified as a manufacturing engineer. He continued working with metal dies and machinery and was eventually transferred to Wisconsin, where he resides today.
    Over the years his hobby interests involved model airplanes and later, live steam engines. His Hypocycloidal Pumping Engine, based on an original on display in the Ford Museum was selected as the featured engine at the 2005 NAMES show.
    Building a model of a historic ship engine
    His early interest in the USS Monitor was rekindled in the early 1970’s when he read an article about the ship in National Geographic stating that the sunken wreck had been discovered and work was planned to recover it. He had also seen a pattern model of the engine on a trip to England in 1977. He vowed that someday when he was retired he would like to model the engine from that historic ship. In 1997, the US Navy started recovery of that ship, and he began several years of research on the engine. This took him to many museums and archives in the US and Britain, but eventually between these archives and consultation with the Mariner’s Museum in Newport News, VA he was able to piece together details on the original engine, no complete drawings of which were ever published.
    Years before, a medical restriction on lifting had cause Richard to move from heavy model steam railroad projects to smaller stationary steam engines that could be built on a tabletop. This in part helped determine the chosen scale for the Monitor engine of 1/16. The engine was completed in 2007 and displayed at the North American Model Engineering Society show among other places. Richard plans to gather all the research data he prepared in producing the engine and publish a book on it to further the understanding of this unique engine among historians.
    The extensive research involved in this unique engine and the uncompromising level of quality to which it was produced brought Richard to the attention of the Joe Martin Foundation. Richard’s intention to make this information available to others in a book is also a factor in the decision to name him the Foundation’s “Metalworking Craftsman of the Year”. This award along with a check for $2000 will be presented at the North American Model Engineering Society Expo, April 18-19, 2009 in Toledo, Ohio. Several of Richard’s engines including the Monitor engine will be on display at the Foundation’s show booth, and Richard will be there to discuss the project.
    A page on Richard with photos of the engine, his other projects and his shop can be found at www.CraftsmanshipMuseum.com/Carlstedt.htm. A video of the engine running can be seen at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VWn8gQ9Ykpk. (Be sure to select “View in High Quality” to better appreciate the fine workmanship.) The video is also liked from his museum page. You can also learn more about the Joe Martin Foundation and its goals at www.CraftsmanshipMuseum.com. The foundation was established by Joe Martin, owner of Sherline Products Inc. to honor the "best of the best" in the field of metalworking at the small end of the size scale. The foundation is approved as a 501(c)(3) organization and contributions of tools, projects or funds are tax deductible under US Tax Code.
    For further information contact Craig Libuse, director. 1-760-727-9492 or [email protected].
    Glen
    Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
    I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
    All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

  • #2
    Beautiful model of the engine!

    Anyone know how he managed to make those perfect-looking brass pipe 90 degree elbows?

    Unusual design on the rocking spindles at both ends - the bearing cap bolts look like they take the full thrust of the cylinder.

    Ian
    All of the gear, no idea...

    Comment


    • #3
      well deserved Richard, congratulations!
      in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

      Comment


      • #4
        Congratulations Rich, I can think of no one more deserving.
        Jim H.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Ian B
          Beautiful model of the engine!

          Anyone know how he managed to make those perfect-looking brass pipe 90 degree elbows?

          Unusual design on the rocking spindles at both ends - the bearing cap bolts look like they take the full thrust of the cylinder.

          Ian
          He did an article with lots of pictures in a recent issue of one of the VP mags, Cant seem to find it at the moment. Either Live steam in the last couple of issues or HSM the name sake of this board. maybe somebody can give the exact issue and title.
          Glen
          Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
          I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
          All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

          Comment


          • #6
            Congratulations Rich, You earned that one, the Monitor engine is a work of art.
            Mark Hockett

            Comment


            • #7
              Rich had an article in a recent HSM on the elbows, he also posted the method here;

              http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/sho...monitor+engine

              In the writeup in the Craftsmanship award, it mentions it took Rich 12 months and 168 failed castings to finally arrive at the finished manifold.
              Jim H.

              Comment


              • #8
                Congratulations Rich on the well earned recognition.

                The article about the pipe elbows was in the November/December 2008 issue of The Home Shop Machinist. Much of the article appeared here first in a thread started by Rich. The magazine article does have a more in-depth description of the process of making the pipe, along with a few extra photos.

                George
                George
                Traverse City, MI

                Comment


                • #9
                  Again, well deserved. The commitment to accuracy and the quality of work are at the top of the game. That piece is destined for a museum for sure.
                  James Kilroy

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                  • #10
                    WOW, what beautiful work !



                    Thanks a lot Richard, now I am all depressed over my crap again, another trip for me to the garden to eat worms I see.

                    Ken

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Congratulations Rich! The Monitor engine is stunning!! I hope someday to approach that level of skill/craftsmanship!

                      I was also glad to see the Monitor get the recognition it deserved in HSM Magazine!
                      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by PTSideshow
                        He did an article with lots of pictures in a recent issue of one of the VP mags
                        It was the HSM magazine, two issues back.

                        Rich posted a very detailed thread with many pictures showing the whole build here:

                        Model of the Monitor Engine Finished

                        and his very clever method of hollowing the bronze engine manifold is here:

                        Producing an Internal Bore Around Corners Without Tooling
                        "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Not at all surprised. But congrats on the win, you deserve it!
                          Russ
                          Master Floor Sweeper

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                          • #14
                            Thanks to the internet I've been fortunate enough to see Rich's craftsmanship before.
                            Definitely a well deserved recognition of extraordinary skill as a master craftsman.
                            Here's a couple of "Atta Boys" Rich, well done!
                            Hopefully I'll be lucky enough to see his work in person one day.
                            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                            Location: British Columbia

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Congratulations on a well deserved award!!! And thanks for sharing it (your work that is) with us.

                              Comment

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