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  • Slitting saw speeds

    I just acquired 2 slitting saws. Both are 3.5 inches in diam, one is 1/8 and the other is 3/32 inches, HSS.
    I have no idea how fast to run these. It's my first experience with saws. What are some typical uses?
    Anybody have any ideas?
    Thanks,
    Jack

  • #2
    Typical use is to take a "almost completed" part, snatch it from
    a marginal set-up ( designed not to scratch it )
    and sling it across the shop at a substantial velocity.
    Typically destroying the part, bending the saw, the arbor it's mounted
    in and whatever else it connects with on it's way to the garbage can.
    Also may lead to foul language...
    Dave P.

    Comment


    • #3
      Figure it out the same way as any other cutter. In your case, a 3.5" dia. cutter has a circumference of just about 11", or 0.92 feet. If you want 100 feet/minute cutting speed, that would be 100/0.92, or about 109 rpm. I probably run mine slower than recommended, but I tend to be cautious.

      Uses? I'm building Edgar T. Westbury's "Unicorn" steam engine, and I just used a slitting saw to split the castings for the bearing blocks. I use them to take off pieces of material, instead of having to turn it all into chips. I've slotted screws.
      Whatever.

      Oh - when you use them, you'll hear that not all the teeth are cutting, and wonder if something is wrong. It's not. That's the nature of the beasts.
      Last edited by SGW; 01-08-2009, 05:49 PM.
      ----------
      Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
      Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
      Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
      There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
      Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
      Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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      • #4
        I have used to gash gear teeth prior to hobbing. And like the above post said I never been able to get all the teeth to cut. Gary P. Hansen
        In memory of Marine Engineer Paul Miller who gave his life for his country 7-19-2010 Helmand Province, Afghanistan. Freedom is not free, it is paid for with blood.

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        • #5
          You will want a very on center arbor to get all teeth cutting..\


          I suggest use of cutting oil (not coolant) on sides of non-sidecutting saws.

          Comment


          • #6
            Make sure that you bring the cutter up to the work and start the cut slowly and after you have it started then you can increase the rate of travel, other wise its hard on the teeth and can grab the work (see Dave P.'s post for results of that)
            The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

            Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

            Southwestern Ontario. Canada

            Comment


            • #7
              I get alot more predictable result with smaller diameter....tend to run mine slower than max cause I'm a sissy and dont really care for the taste of metal....had several different brands too....the ones from Grizzly are better suited to cutting plywood...or carving your thanksgiving turkey....didnt last very long even with light cuts and slow speeds....

              Comment


              • #8
                "You will want a very on center arbor to get all teeth cutting..\"

                I don't think there has ever been a slitting saw that cut equally on all teeth, its one of the laws of physics right?

                Calculate you desired chip load, in steel I'd suggest starting around .002. So if thats the chip load you want, and you have a 48 tooth cutter, not uncommon, you will need to feed .096 PER REVOLUTION to maintain that chip load.

                Now, I'd start at 60fpm in steel, no faster until you get a feel for the setup. With a 3.5" cutter that is around 65 rpm. That means you are going to feed at 65 * .096 or ~6.25 inches a minute. That gives you an idea.

                Now another tip, if you are going to cut deep, say .75 DOC, start by making a very light cut, like .125, then the following passes will be guided, to a degree, by the existing slot.

                Do not even think about climb cutting.

                Unless you are cutting cast iron, use LOTS of cutting lube.

                Make sure your setups are secure, if anything gets out of whack, they WILL provoke much foul language.
                James Kilroy

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Dave P.
                  Typical use is to take a "almost completed" part, snatch it from
                  a marginal set-up ( designed not to scratch it )
                  and sling it across the shop at a substantial velocity.
                  Typically destroying the part, bending the saw, the arbor it's mounted
                  in and whatever else it connects with on it's way to the garbage can.
                  Also may lead to foul language...
                  Dave P.
                  LOL

                  I have done just that. Cutting the bronze bearing caps for a steam enginge. First one was fine second one grabbed half way, shattered the blade, bent the arbor and left a tooth embedded in the part which i could not get out.

                  I have greatly improved my success with flood coolant and lots of it, dont let the crap build up un the blade. I have also recently got some side & face cutting saws which seem much better.

                  Dave
                  If it does'nt fit, hit it.
                  https://ddmetalproducts.co.uk
                  http://www.davekearley.co.uk

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Davek0974
                    LOL

                    I have done just that. Cutting the bronze bearing caps for a steam enginge. First one was fine second one grabbed half way, shattered the blade, bent the arbor and left a tooth embedded in the part which i could not get out.

                    I have greatly improved my success with flood coolant and lots of it, dont let the crap build up un the blade. I have also recently got some side & face cutting saws which seem much better.

                    Dave

                    OHHHHH, he said "flood coolant"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Oh - be sure your mill is trammed properly, or the blade will bind.
                      ----------
                      Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
                      Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
                      Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
                      There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
                      Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
                      Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I can't get it to work. It looks like it just scrapes the work. The blade looks like it has dulled. The mill, sieg x3, just slows down. The mill looks like it is not made for slitting.
                        Time to move on.
                        Thanks,
                        Jack

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Jack772
                          I can't get it to work. It looks like it just scrapes the work. The blade looks like it has dulled. The mill, sieg x3, just slows down. The mill looks like it is not made for slitting.
                          Time to move on.
                          Thanks,
                          Jack
                          And how fast in RPM was it going?

                          In what material?

                          Dulled saws are nearly always from running way too fast. Does the Sieg even GO lower than 100 RPM? I looked up the HF ones, and most limit at 100 RPM, which would be about 90 SFM, fairly fast.

                          The mill "not being made for slitting" might be true speed-wise, but otherwise that wouldn't be correct. ANY mill will do all the milling jobs. The saw might be too big for it, though.
                          1601

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Teenage_Machinist
                            You will want a very on center arbor to get all teeth cutting..\


                            I suggest use of cutting oil (not coolant) on sides of non-sidecutting saws.
                            Would you care to share your wisdom...why we wouldn't use coolant????
                            This I want to hear...
                            I have tools I don't even know I own...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Any HSS tooling,milling,sawing,turning,in mild steel,start of with sfm of 50-70 fpm with coolant and at least 0.002" depth of cut per edge.It`s easy to work up the way.Start of too high and the cutter is finished instantly.
                              Mark.

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