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Monach 10EE design feature

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  • Monach 10EE design feature

    The other day Mac had us dribbling and slathering over his new toys as told in this thread.

    http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=32096

    Note in the pictures in post #8 there is a chrome screw to the right of the cross slide hand wheel.
    You can be forgiven thinking that this is a lock for the dial, it isn't, the lock is the catch on the face.

    Neither is it a lock to lock the slide.

    It's true purpose is to enable quick threading, or rather quick retract.

    Infeed on these for a full turn is 0.125" radial or 0.250 " on diameter, now 1/8" radial may not clear some of the deeper pitches so they built a disk mechanism inside to allow it to do nearly two turns, more than enough for any depth of thread that the machine can handle.

    Here's the build up if anyone fancies copying one.



    This is the dial pulled off. The dog to the right is fixed on the dial, the centre one and one on the left are free to turn.
    The centre on is extra wide so it can catch both.

    How it works is you screw the chrome screw in and wind the cross slide in nearly two tuns so it catches both washers and then hits the fixed stop. You then use the top slide, slewed round to 29 degrees to apply the cut and start the thread.

    At the end of the thread you wind the cross slide out until it's clear, no need to watch any dials.
    Wind back to the start of the thread, wind cross slide back in until it stops and put fresh cut on with topslide, do pass 2 etc

    Very quick as you are only watching to top slide dial for infeed distance per pass.



    View inside with both washers off, it's a very simple mechanism but very effective for doing threads fast and foolproof .

    .
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    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.




  • #2
    John
    Nice, but you are not going to get as many hits as the 'cherry wood lathe with the DRAC'!
    please visit my webpage:
    http://motorworks88.webs.com/

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    • #3
      Or the 'precision' acme screw with plastic nut off a trailer park satellite dish

      .
      .

      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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      • #4
        Rockwell's have a similar mechanism, but even simpler. Just a wide inverted "V" shaped piece with a pivot at the point. Then there is a pin on the back side of the dial shroud (away from operator). Normally, that pin is pulled out and does not engage the "V". But push it in and crank the cross slide in until it stops against the "V. See, the first time past the "V", it just rocks over, but it will block passage the next revolution, and that stops the crank. When you want to crank out at the end of the thread, again, first pass of the "V" past the pin and you it just rocks over so that the next pass is blocked. Reset to start of thread, run cross in two turns till it stops, and you're ready to set the in-feed on the compound for the next cut.

        I do miss that feature on my new lathe. Perhaps a project???
        Russ
        Master Floor Sweeper

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        • #5
          Those washers are the same thing in my L1011 Trim assembly for limiting the amount of travel the hand cranks will turn.

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          • #6
            I take it the tab on the left most ring contacts the chrome screw end or is there a stop block attached to the screw?

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            • #7
              Your "Lock Collars", that's what Monarch calls them; the flat one should be in the center between the folded ear collars. The ears catch on the center collar. The outer collars catch on pins in the dial and cross feed bushing. The cross feed bushing has the actuating pin screw.
              The following pictures are of the same assembly for a Monarch Series 60 16" lathe.







              Harry

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              • #8
                Rather like a 3-digit combination lock. Nice idea.

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                • #9
                  Thanks for those pictures Harry! Looks like it would be a fun add-on project.
                  "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                  • #10
                    I have that on my 10EE, and didn't understand what was happening until recent posts on this feature. The stop point is always the same position on the graduated dial (not 0 as it happens).

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                    • #11
                      I will foolishly assume that the slight taper on the end of the engaging knob is to allow a slight adjustment in the dial marks. So you can really zero up the lines?

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                      • #12
                        I saw that feature for the first time the other night when watching the videos from MIT that someone posted on the board. I thought it looked like a 10EE. I was wondering how the did that. Now I know.
                        Thanks.

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                        • #13
                          Daryl,
                          Which taper are you refering to? There's a cross sectional view of the telescoping cross feed screw assembly in the EE manual.
                          Harry

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by kvom
                            I have that on my 10EE, and didn't understand what was happening until recent posts on this feature. The stop point is always the same position on the graduated dial (not 0 as it happens).
                            It does if you zero the dial

                            .
                            .

                            Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                            • #15
                              Harry, the end of knob EE3432. It has a tapered end (mine does). Seems that if you screw the knob in or out, when its fully engaged, it will move the zero point alittle each way set the dial dead on.
                              Last edited by daryl bane; 01-10-2009, 12:44 AM.

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