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  • Another motor shaft..

    So I've got this general purpose 1/3 hp GE motor. I want it use it for one of my projects but the problem is that the shaft (1/2") is split for some type of connection to a gear box or washing machine etc... It only sticks less than 1" and as you can see is difficult to get any type of coupling on it. Previous owner had machined a coupler that he locked with a set screw in between the split shaft and of course now it's all messed up and the coupler no longer runs true making the motor vibrate really bad.

    So, I'm wondering If I might be able to replace the shaft with a longer one to make it usable. I've got some 1/2" 1144 that would be perfect for this and the only machine work would be a groove for an e-clip at the front. I don't know much about electric motors so where I need the help is in how to get the the other pieces off the shaft. Is it pressed on? I've got a small press but wanted to look for help before trying anything. Any help appreciated. Pics follow...

    Ken

    http://kenrinehart.org/motor1.jpg

    http://kenrinehart.org/motor2.jpg

    http://kenrinehart.org/motor3.jpg

  • #2
    Ken, that is a soda fountain pump motor. The pump mounts to the circle flange with a clamp and the pump has a tang that fits the motor shaft.

    Patrick


    Edit: Never took one apart, so I can't help you there. Changed a many of them tho.
    Last edited by HSS; 01-13-2009, 10:59 PM.

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    • #3
      If it is built like motors I have messed with the rotor
      is pressed on but in such a way that nondestructive
      removal would be difficult. The centrifugal switch
      part would be more easily removed with a gear puller
      set up than the rest of the rotor. How about a
      mortise and tenon set up with a pin and sleeve over
      it as an extension?
      Steve

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      • #4
        Motor

        kenrinc,
        Do you have a welder and a lathe? That would fix it, weld a stub on it and turn down the welding smooth enough to make it through the bearings.

        Or so it looks to me.

        Thanks,
        Paul

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        • #5
          That's what I was afraid of. I do have a MIG setup; it's just a small 120v 90amp jobber. Never tried anything quite like that before. I don't see how I'd be able to "burn" in deep enough for something to take hold.

          Ken

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          • #6
            The technical term is a carbonator pump mount.

            It vibrates with nothing attached???

            Comment


            • #7
              Machine a "Tang" centrally on a piece of shaft the same diameter as the motor shaft. Then bore a piece of round bar the shaft diameter ( A Sleeve ). Slide sleeve onto new bar so it overlaps the tang and weld sleeve in position on new shaft. Probably like original fitting.

              Regards Ian.
              You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

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              • #8
                The 12V fuel pump I use for transferring diesel to the tractor has the same end on the motor (a little longer maybe, but the same split). The pump has a circular shaft hole in it with two "ears" machined out as well. Sort of like keyways. A piece of material simply slides in to join them. Sort of like a shear pin if something goes horribly wrong...

                Andrew

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                • #9
                  Actually Macona, the pump could be either a carbonator pump OR a circulator pump. The only difference being that the carbonator pump is brass and the circulator pump is stainless steel. You shouldn't circulate carbonated water with a brass pump as it will create carbonic acid or so we were told in school.

                  Patrick
                  Last edited by HSS; 01-14-2009, 10:32 AM.

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                  • #10
                    I fixed a motor like that recently without welding as I didn't want to put that much heat so close to the meltable parts. I cut off the damaged portion and machined a taper about the same as a jacobs taper on the end of the shaft. Then I drilled and tapped the end of the shaft for 10-32. Then made an extension shaft slightly oversize in OD and put in the matching taper using a small boring bar at the correct angle in the compound. Drilled through the extension and counterbored it to take a 10-32 cap screw with the diameter of the head reduced as much as possible by grinding. Loctite the entire works together and then machine off the slight oversize to produce perfect concentricity of the extension. If you are good ( ) you can omit the last step.
                    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by macona
                      The technical term is a carbonator pump mount.

                      It vibrates with nothing attached???

                      Correct. It is a carbonator pump mount. I have two of them in my shop right now. Both run Procon water pumps. One is on a water circulator and the other is on a Bernard cooler, both for TIG welding.

                      Those motors are generally very smooth and quiet. It sounds like the previous owner has ruined that one. If it vibrates, it's all done.

                      .

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                      • #12
                        The motor runs smooth and quiet; amazingly so. It's just the hacked motor coupling that has a small pulley on the end that causes the whole thing to vibrate. I'd be curious to try the non weld fix just because I'm not sure the plastic in there won't melt. I've also got to figure out a way to rig it between centers with all the stuff on it since there are no center holes.

                        Ken-

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                        • #13
                          You didn't answer the question, do you have a lathe? and I'll add to that do you have a steady for it ?

                          .
                          .

                          Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                          • #14
                            Sorry John, yes, I have a lathe and a steady rest.

                            Ken

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                            • #15
                              Ken, looked at the pictures and the second one tells all.

                              This is just my take on this and others ideas may vary, it's not the only way to extend the shaft but given the criteria you have described it's the way I'd go about this.

                              First off we are given the shaft size of 1/2" and it's a sleeve bearing motor, this means the part that runs in the sleeve has to have no distortion or damage, to me this puts welding out.

                              There is a part of the shaft that non critical and that the bit between the sleeve bearing journal and the rotor, the inside the fins bit.
                              Now it's a 1/3 HP so that not powerful and it will accept a stub.

                              The shaft is 1/2 and if we bore to 7/16" to get max diameter for the stub it would leave the rotor very weak, so drop down a size and choose 3/8", now you may wonder if 3/8" is too weak for a stub but many motors such as this neck down even further than this to take pinions for gearboxes.

                              So measure the sleeve bearing if it is 1/2" than put your piece of 1144 in the chuck and as close to the chuck as you can get set your steady up to run on the piece of 1144. Now once set slide it down the bed and fit the rotor to the chuck and steady, it will be on centre as you have set it on the piece of bar.
                              saw off the forked but and face off, centre drill then drill just under 3/8" and ream to size if you have one, if not final drill to 3/8"

                              Drill deep enough so some of the stub goes into the shaft where it enters the rotor. Then turn you piece of 1144 down so it's tight sliding fit into the rotor, turn it down 1/8" shorter than the PARALLEL part of the hole.
                              Smear with loctite, tap in and cross drill in the non critical part of the shaft and tap a roll pin in.

                              That should complete the job.
                              .

                              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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