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  • #16
    ...and go easy on the LocTite lest it hydraulic lock and keep the new shaft from seating all the way. (I got the tee-shirt.)
    Milton

    "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

    "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

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    • #17
      Well I thought it was going to work. Turns out I can't get my steady around the shaft because those fins are in the way. My steady jaws are on the tailstock side also which makes me loose quite a bit in terms of how much I can hold. The steady will only come up to the split connector and that's it. Perfect application for a cat head here alas I just don't have the time to make one (the project that requires a project that requires a project .... ) May try Evan's idea instead we shall see...

      ken-

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      • #18
        Wanted to thank everyone for input on this. I fixed my problem. So the steady wouldn't work because I just don't have the clearance. What I need is a cathead and that's a project I'm working on now. May have some questions about that one John :-) Anyway, I cut the split shaft part off, adjusted my 3 jaw to run the motor shaft true by tapping it in and cinching the bolts up. I figured I could live with the runout at the other end since I didn't have a steady that would work. It was pretty rigid as it was enough so to actually face off that end using really light cuts. I then center drilled, drilled out to 3/8 and then cleaned it up by boring. Cut my piece of 1144 to match, milled a flat, loctited it in and done. I spun it between centers to check the runout. Not bad at all. Put it all back together and it runs beautifully.

        Thank's to all especially John who at least pointed me in the right direction..

        http://www.kenrinehart.org/motorfix.jpg

        Ken-
        Last edited by kenrinc; 01-17-2009, 03:32 AM.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by kenrinc
          Well I thought it was going to work. Turns out I can't get my steady around the shaft because those fins are in the way. My steady jaws are on the tailstock side also which makes me loose quite a bit in terms of how much I can hold. The steady will only come up to the split connector and that's it. Perfect application for a cat head here alas I just don't have the time to make one

          ken-
          Steadies are the bane of my life because of the work I do, as Ken has found out a lot of steadies aren't made central and if you have a vee bed lathe it's not as simple as just turning it round.
          On my CVA I set to one day and machined a new vee in the opposite side, there is plenty of meat, so now that steady will fit both ways.

          Glad you got sorted Ken.
          .

          Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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          • #20
            Originally posted by HSS
            Actually Macona, the pump could be either a carbonator pump OR a circulator pump. The only difference being that the carbonator pump is brass and the circulator pump is stainless steel. You shouldn't circulate carbonated water with a brass pump as it will create carbonic acid or so we were told in school.

            Patrick
            Never seen a stainless version of one of those pumps. Cant imagine how much one of those must cost.

            When carbon dioxide is mixed with water it creates carbonic acid. Thats soda is tangy tasting.

            Best guess is the carbonic acid will attack something in the brass. Probably the zinc?

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            • #21
              Not wanting to hi-jack macona's post but a note for anyone working on stainless pumps.
              Even though the shaft may be stainless it will be either sleeved or stubbed.
              The part of the shaft running thru the rotor has to be magnetic to get the return path for the flux.

              I was instructed to built some motors with all stainless shafts some while ago and they didn't work correctly, low on power, sounded like a phase was down and got hot quickly.
              The company did some research and we had to swap them for normal steel with stainless stubs fitted and they were back to normal.
              .
              .

              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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              • #22
                I can see that if using austenitic SS but what about using ferritic SS? It's perfectly well magnetic.
                Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                • #23
                  Don't know Evan.
                  I have often wondered about that, using the 400 series.

                  I have suggested it in the past but no one wants to take the chance when they know there is an easy work round.

                  In a lot of cases as well 400 series isn't a regular stocked item at stock holders and has to be ordered in so that means minimum quantities and ££££

                  I have thought about trying it but the only 400 series I have is about 20' of 2" bar that was ordered wrong at a company and after a short time scrapped so the error wasn't on show
                  .

                  Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                  • #24
                    Macona,
                    The stainless pumps aren't that much higher than the brass. Multiplex drink systems use the brass pumps to carbonate and the stainless pumps to circulate soda water thru the syrup bundle to keep the soda water cold up to the fountain head. Warm soda water causes the drinks to be flat.
                    This is where I get my pumps.

                    http://foxxequipment.com/cart/shop/zc045.html


                    John, That makes sense to me but the motor is a normal motor except for the short, split shaft. Only the clamp on pump is stainless.

                    Kenrinc, sorry about hijacking your post. You did excellent on that motor repair.

                    Patrick

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by HSS
                      Macona,

                      John, That makes sense to me but the motor is a normal motor except for the short, split shaft. Only the clamp on pump is stainless.

                      Kenrinc, sorry about hijacking your post. You did excellent on that motor repair.

                      Patrick
                      Understood. Many of the pumps I work on only have the lower part of the shaft in stainless, just enough for the seal and whatever it's pumping to come into contact with.

                      Stainless weld with stick very well to steel, in fact it's the recommended way to weld armoured panels on tanks.
                      I often take a normal steel shaft down undersize, build up with stainless weld and re machine back to size. Quicker and stronger than stubbing.

                      The worse pumps I come across are ferric Chloride pumps, this stuff eats everything, including stainless but except Nylon and titanium.
                      The pumps are all moulded nylon, shaft and bolts in titanium.
                      problem is the fumes eats the motor away and after about 9 months to a year it looks like a lace curtain, so swap the titanium shaft, it too expensive to scrap and start again.

                      .
                      .

                      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                      • #26
                        My young bride rebuilds pumps where she works and they use titanium on some of their pumps. Clorine Dioxide and Sodium Clorate have to have titanium shaft sleeve, impellor, stuffing box, mechanical seal, and casing. The Clorine Dioxide pump has a solid titanium shaft.

                        My young bride at work with one of the pumps she rebuilds.

                        http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/i...24X30Small.jpg
                        Last edited by HSS; 01-17-2009, 09:27 AM.

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