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Makin' a Steady

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  • madman
    replied
    Pretty Cool

    Nice effort and great idea.

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  • jackary
    replied
    Fixed Steady

    Hi pntrbl
    Here is what I made a while ago. It was made from 1" length of 6" steel pipe. It works well.
    Regards
    Alan

    http://s107.photobucket.com/albums/m...t=P1020309.jpg

    http://s107.photobucket.com/albums/m...t=P1020312.jpg

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  • lakeside53
    replied
    A question about the cats-head (big bearing) type...

    For rigidity and/or TIR... wouldn't you need a pair of preloaded bearings, like ground or shimmed angular thrust bearings back-to-back? I see pairs of 2MM212's and 14's on ebay all the time at decent prices. Overkill? I can see you get to adjust the part anywhere you like, but surely the adjusted part should rotate as accurately as the spindle end? Standard C3 fit radial bearings are quite sloppy in comparison to the spindle. So.. what am I missing?
    Last edited by lakeside53; 02-27-2009, 02:01 AM.

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  • Oldbrock
    replied
    aluminum steady

    The material being supported doesn't care what the steady is made of. Have used it many times since I made it and it works just as well as a cast iron one. A friend had the 1" plate and it works just like factory. Peter

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  • madman
    replied
    Wow Nice

    Aluminumn? Wouldnt it be better out of steel ?? Resonance harmonics Humming noises affecting surface finish>? I must admit aluminumn would be nice i got a big chunk layin around. I just made a few neat gadgets for my bridgeport mill. I like aluminumn projects a lot always seem to be machining stainless crap. LOL Perhaps a aluminumn steady would be OK ?? Thanx Nice Job on it

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  • Oldbrock
    replied
    Me too

    My SB came without a steady, made this one out of 1" 6061 plate

    The pads are bronze and I have no problems with marking up the work.Peter

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  • John Stevenson
    replied
    Mike,
    Will post some pics tomorrow, late here and the workshop is haunted.

    Got a fair selection between the 3 lathes.

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  • madman
    replied
    Thanx Guys

    I been challenged by this latest project. Sometimes i just forget stuff. Must be getting Old. LOL anyhow things arent going too vbadly. nEW SHOP STILL NO HEAT . aNYWAYS IM WAITING FOR sIR jOHNS pICTURES. i STILL RECALL A POST OF SOMEONE WHO MADE A STEADY WITH CNC EQUIPMENT OR GOT THE PPARTS LASER CUT AND THEN MACHINED THEM UP. mY LATHE ONLY WILL HOLD A 5 INCH DIA IN THE STEADY IT HAS AND I WANT TO MAKE A NEW MODEL. tHE LATHE IS A tOOLROOM cINCUINATTI lATHE WITH A 15 INCH SWING AND 36 B(oops caplock on LOL) between centers. I need to hols a 8 inch dia min imumn dia or even up to the lathe limits?? if possible thanx to all for youre valuable time and great ideas and tips. Mike

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  • John Stevenson
    replied
    Only just noticed this thread.

    My TOS has hardened steel running pads, when I first got it I thought that was a stupid idea and would change over to bronze later but in fact they run very well and mark less than the bronze ones on the other steadies.

    I have about 6 or 7 steadies between three lathes as a lot of my work is steady work.
    I'll get photo's and post later tonight.

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  • barts
    replied
    If you're doing a lot of the same size piece, make yourself a steel sleeve that just fits over the part, and has some split tapered threads at the end (like a small tap wrench does)... Fit a round nut w/ some holes for tightening
    and you're set; the wheels will run on steel and there will be no sliding on the Al piece.

    Leave a comment:


  • pntrbl
    replied
    Still making progress on my steady, but now that I got 'er spinning we're definitely seeing a stripe. Louder than I expected too.



    I can't fingernail anything tho and the workpiece is 6061 Alu. You can just about rub the black stripe off with your finger and I'll bet a piece of emery would make it go away completely. Over time tho ... I dunno .....

    The threads were already there BTW. It's my spindle test piece.

    SP

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  • ulav8r
    replied
    There is one drawback to rollers that hasn't been mentioned yet. If they are set too tight, they can roll a groove into the workpiece, a fact that I discovered the first time I used a steady with rollers.

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  • BadDog
    replied
    How about soft brass/bronze "tires" for your bearings? Combined with a chip guard, seems a good option. Then add "wipers" based on way wipers. Then a cover based on way covers. And an automatic tensioner to handle temperature expansion. And, and...

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  • pcarpenter
    replied
    Paging John Stevenson

    I've not had to deal with this but I would seriously wonder about the wisdom of brass pads on brass. Lube would become *very* critical as brass will friction weld very easily.

    I see Mcgyver's point about roll-stamping the work with swarf, but I think that on softer metals, you could imbed brass in the work. In the sort of work where you have the liberty of later turning down the section where the steady sat to some final dimension, this is a non-issue.

    The other issue with the brass tips on my cheap import lathe is that they are pretty soft and quickly wear to the shape of the current project...which will most certainly not be correct for the next one. On the other hand, the tips are threaded in place and I can make more.

    I'll tell you what I really want is for John Stevenson to start selling just the two laser-cut forms he has showed us here before, as a "starter kit". Shipping a bunch of steel around is not cost effective, but just the two outer forms would be the only hard part for most of us...with the rest of the stuff coming from the scrap box. Those are so well laid out and neatly cut that they should make for a good project starter and a good end result.

    Paul

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  • j king
    replied
    Tipped fingers are fine but the bearings will do much better at high speeds for carbide.You set the bearing fingers and you are pretty much done.Fingers that are tipped are always wearing plus if you run them a little loose you will get chatter. Let the mud fly....

    The fear of chips going thru a roller is slim if you make a guard out of cardboard.Simple.
    Last edited by j king; 01-20-2009, 02:13 PM.

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