Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How To Use A Rotary Table For Advanced Contouring?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How To Use A Rotary Table For Advanced Contouring?

    Are there any books or videos that teach you how to use a rotary table for advanced contouring?

  • #2
    If you're reffering to using it to blend radii on different centres you need an X-Y table mounted on top of the rotary table. Otherwise it means re-centreing for each arc centre (Substitue centER if in the US of)

    Regards Ian.

    PS Just remembered, easy way is CNC.
    You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm reffering to mounting a rotary table on a knee mill. I need to be able to cut complex profiles without using a CNC. Before CNC I'm sure this was done with a rotary table mounted on a knee mill.

      Comment


      • #4
        Some can be done with a top slide rotary table, but generally not with a standard rotary table, at least not without some painful setup efforts. Other options include accessories like my my Volstro rotary head attachment. I've managed to do some rather interesting stuff with it that I don't think could have been done (easily) otherwise, though it's still fiddly and requires a fairly light touch. There is also the REAL rotary heads like the K&T, and the "Cherying Heads", universal tables, coupled drives, and other various accessories. The rotary table can do a lot of useful work, but in typical/basic form does not lend itself to "advanced contouring".

        For most HSMs with only "aesthetic" requirements in this area, I think the main course is to do the layout and then cut to the line (perhaps using a rotary table to align with a convenient axis), and then file for final contour. In fact, file work was an important part of die and mold making "back in the day" (at least when I worked as a draftsman on extrusion die tooling), probably still is...
        Russ
        Master Floor Sweeper

        Comment


        • #5
          Sorry Neil, I assumed you'd already mounted the rotary table on the B/P first. OK, from there you THEN mount a co-ordinate (X-Y) table centrally ON TOP of the rotary table.

          Clamp the rotary table centrally L to R and F to B on the topslide, and move the slides so that the R/T is centred under the spindle.

          Clamp the X-Y table centrally on the rotary table.

          By clamping anything to the top of the X-Y table and centreing any hole position under the spindle using the X-Y slides, you can machine blend arcs by rotating the R/T handle.

          If you only want to drill holes at pitch centres, you move the topslide and crossslide.

          Regards Ian.
          You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by BadDog
            Some can be done with a top slide rotary table, but generally not with a standard rotary table, at least not without some painful setup efforts. Other options include accessories like my my Volstro rotary head attachment. I've managed to do some rather interesting stuff with it that I don't think could have been done (easily) otherwise, though it's still fiddly and requires a fairly light touch. There is also the REAL rotary heads like the K&T, and the "Cherying Heads", universal tables, coupled drives, and other various accessories. The rotary table can do a lot of useful work, but in typical/basic form does not lend itself to "advanced contouring".
            Is there a book or video that shows how to mill complex profiles with a top slide rotary table or even with a Volstro rotary head? I imagine that one would draw a picture of the contour with numbers to position to written in ahead of time to mill to?

            Comment


            • #7
              Ian, are you aware of any book or video that teaches how to mill profile/contours with the type of set up you described?

              Comment


              • #8
                I know of no book or video, but would love to see one. I've generally sussed it out on my own for the most part. I've got a Volstro manual with what amounts to a "teaser" in a handful of very basic suggestions. The sales brochure is actually more enlightening in that it shows some interesting things that can theoretically be made with it, and then I kinda reverse engineered/figured from that.

                I've also got a "light" milling table that I can theoretically mount on my 12" Troyke V/H, but that beast is so heavy that I'm reluctant to fool with it for what is often a few simple cuts. So if it's small enough, I just mount the Volstro (usually sufficient). If not, I make do with multiple setups and cuts, perhaps followed by a file and such...
                Russ
                Master Floor Sweeper

                Comment


                • #9
                  How about defining what you are trying to do rather than asking if an undefined action can be achieved with an undefined setup.
                  Better chance of tapping other's experience and ideas if you give a description of what you are trying to achieve,
                  Regards,
                  Nick

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    NickH, I wish to mill complex contours that have angles and radii without having to resort to using a file and without using a cam program and a cnc machine. I'm looking for a book, video or online help guide that shows the best way to do this using examples. If you have anything specific to add on where I can find this information I'd appreciate it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If you have a rotary table with a x-y table on top of it, it is relatively easy. With out an x-y table on top, it can be done, but I would take the time to do it. To much work to be worth it, unless someone was willing to pay me shop rate and not complaining about it!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Pics please

                        Any chance of a pic or two to show just what this "contour" application is - or just enough to let me see it at least - as I am not at all sure what it is.

                        Perhaps I know it by another name - or perhaps not.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          This Kind Of Thing?

                          Originally posted by Neil Jones
                          NickH, I wish to mill complex contours that have angles and radii without having to resort to using a file and without using a cam program and a cnc machine. I'm looking for a book, video or online help guide that shows the best way to do this using examples. If you have anything specific to add on where I can find this information I'd appreciate it.
                          This kind of stuff?

                          Yuasa xy Rotary Table setups.







                          Here's the prints, this is the material, have at it!

                          Never saw a book on it, you have the machine X-Y, the rotary's x-y, and the rotary's graduated rotation. Center up the rotary, it's slides, cutter diameter, external, internal radii, angular cuts, if all centers can be set within range of slides, how are you going to hold the part?

                          As posted above the Volstro head can do some wonderful work also.

                          Cheers,
                          Les H.
                          The Impossible Takes Just A Little Bit Longer!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yup. That kind of stuff.

                            I found this but it's too basic.

                            http://rick.sparber.org/rtcs.pdf

                            What I'd like to see are some hands on projects that make use of a rotary table and cross slide done by someone very experienced with using a rotary table and cross slide who likes to teach. I remember a long time ago in trade school that those hands on projects really taught us machining skills. I don't think many machinists have great rotary table and cross slide skills because of CNC and CAM. Based on this .pdf (it’s very recent) I think there are quite a few of us who have an interest in building skills in this area.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              If I could find one the size of that Yuasa for decent money I would own it. I found a 15" Troyke with top slide, and it was pretty cheap compared to what they bring, but just too forking big. About 300+ lbs...
                              Russ
                              Master Floor Sweeper

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X