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  • Oversize Bearing problem

    To all
    How would you mount a Ball Bearing, # 6202-10, with an ID of 0.625” on to a shaft which has an OD of 0.6225”?
    The original Bearing, # SKF I – 70336 - AZ ID 0.6225 is out of production.
    The bearings are for the cutter head of a Walker Turner Jointer (Year 1940) . Speed 4500RPM .
    Hilmar

  • #2
    Originally posted by h12721
    To all
    How would you mount a Ball Bearing, # 6202-10, with an ID of 0.625” on to a shaft which has an OD of 0.6225”?
    The original Bearing, # SKF I – 70336 - AZ ID 0.6225 is out of production.
    The bearings are for the cutter head of a Walker Turner Jointer (Year 1940) . Speed 4500RPM .
    Hilmar
    Two thoughts - first cheap & easy and might fail, try Loctite retainer. It seems to have some centring effect, try it & test the runout.
    Might even be worth several attempts if the first isn't good enough.
    If it's really no good, get the shaft chromed & ground to size. Much more hassle and expense, but much more certain.

    Tim

    Comment


    • #3
      Could you knurl the shaft slightly under the bearing to expand it a bit?

      You are only looking for .0012 in radius, so it should not take much. It might need to be machined back down to the spec since controlling the knurl would be difficult.

      Comment


      • #4
        Need more info. , but can you machine the shaft for a "standard" 6202 with has a 15mm bore (.5905")?

        Or under cut and shrink a sleeve. Machine to fit the 6202-.625 bearing

        eddie
        please visit my webpage:
        http://motorworks88.webs.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          Old remote repair trick.

          Take a couple of coarse files and roll the shaft's bearing land between them while applying significant pressure from your arms.

          This should raise some fine knurlish burrs that will center the bearing that you lock in place with loctite.

          Hth Ag

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          • #6
            Get the shaft metal sprayed and ground down to size..
            Precision takes time.

            Comment


            • #7
              I am still wondering why WT would intentionally make the shaft under size.
              This was done on a number of machines
              Hilmar

              Comment


              • #8
                Where now?

                Originally posted by Timleech
                Two thoughts - first cheap & easy and might fail, try Loctite retainer. It seems to have some centring effect, try it & test the runout.
                Might even be worth several attempts if the first isn't good enough.
                If it's really no good, get the shaft chromed & ground to size. Much more hassle and expense, but much more certain.

                Tim
                I agree with you Tim - good options.

                Providing that the cutter assembly (cartridge) is OK other-wise, I'd give it a go, but the speed is creeping up into the "I wonder if ................. ?" territory so any eccentricity of or caused by the inner race - perhaps caused by "Loctite"-ing or knurling (whether ground or not) may well be worth considering.

                There are metals other than "chrome" (hard or soft) that can be "sprayed" on very effectively, need no grinding and can be turned to size.

                Some metals sprays do or may require a specified surface preparation as well as pre-reducing to maintain a minimum thickness after final machining.

                There was a very good thread/posts on this in the last 18 months or so.

                Lane, lazlo and a few others - there will certainly be others too - have a pretty good "handle" on this as well and may be able to advise the OP shops that can do the job in his area.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Knurl, turn and polish is one option. For plating either hard chrome is you can get it ground somewhere or nickel. Another option depending on just how much load the shaft is under at that point is to turn the area undersize and weld a split sleeve on. Then turn/grind the sleeve to size. Another idea I just thought of. How about you sliver solder the bearing diameter and turn it to size?

                  I am still wondering why WT would intentionally make the shaft under size.
                  This was done on a number of machines
                  Hilmar

                  Its called "buy our parts
                  Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

                  Comment


                  • #10


                    CST Bearing currently has 2 in stock.

                    When at site, type in 70336 And it will locate item.

                    Patch

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