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  • Starter Projects..

    Would anyone be able to recommend a book or site that contains a few good starter projects for someone new to the craft? I'm starting in w/ some t-nuts clamps and the like and I know for sure that doing is certainly the best for learning.

    What I'm looking for is projects that aren't especially tooling related. Something that I can give away to someone when I'm done if you know what I mean.

    Also, currently I've got a vertical mill and no lathe - is there a resource for items I can create start to finish that can be done w/ just the mill?

    Thanks!

    -jf

  • #2
    Harold Halls' Workshop Practice Book: "Milling: A Complete Course" is a great intro book. The first project is a set of strap clamps and T-Nuts, IIRC...
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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    • #3
      Yes - I've got that book, and I'm going thru it w/ the first few projects (steel is on the way). The T-nuts, clamping bars and a boring head. After that it appears you need a lathe to really finish the other projects.

      but yes, that book is very helpful.

      Comment


      • #4
        A "finger engine" might be good. There's photos of one in this thread: http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/sho...=finger+engine
        ----------
        Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
        Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
        Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
        There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
        Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
        Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

        Comment


        • #5
          Nice... stuff like this is perfect..

          Here's a quick question - would it be possible to accurately machine a flywheel using a rotary table and vertical mill? Or will deflection of the endmill cause an error there?

          Any more of these gems out there?

          Thanks!!

          -JF

          Comment


          • #6
            You can make a wobbler type engine with a hacksaw, file and a drill press. A mill will make it easy.

            there is not much to them.

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gWz2z4LePSs


            Comment


            • #7
              You might also check Lindsay Publications. They have lots of interesting books and their catalog is a hoot. One book you might consider is Machine Shop Projects by South Bend Lathe Works. This was intended to be for vocational schools. My grandkids will be making some of this stuff as they graduate from bird houses and trivets to metal working. (Grandson #1 already made a center punch and a pin punch, chucking the stock in the lathe, turning, and finally hardening and tempering. He was really stoked by the whole process.)

              http://www.lindsaybks.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                You can turn small parts on a mill as well. Can't single point thread, but can turn. Depends on your collett/end mill holder selection, but you put the round piece in the mill head, the cutting tool in the vise. Center the tool like you might on a lathe, and feed the work using the quill feed.

                Lengths are shorter, but can be done.

                I have done this many a time over the years, when tool making, I had to do it in a hurry because the other lathes always seemed to be taken up when I needed to turn a quick (and accurate) diameter for location pins/plugs ect and even small quick turns.
                CCBW, MAH

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by jfernsler
                  Would anyone be able to recommend a book or site that contains a few good starter projects for someone new to the craft? I'm starting in w/ some t-nuts clamps and the like and I know for sure that doing is certainly the best for learning.

                  What I'm looking for is projects that aren't especially tooling related. Something that I can give away to someone when I'm done if you know what I mean.

                  Also, currently I've got a vertical mill and no lathe - is there a resource for items I can create start to finish that can be done w/ just the mill?

                  Thanks!

                  -jf
                  I recently started a site (ProjectsInMetal.com) for exactly this reason, there seems to be a lack of good beginner metalworking projects on the web. Oddly, there are scores of woodworking projects everywhere - maybe because woodworking is a more common hobby?

                  When I fist started on the lathe I got all excited and googled for hours scouring the web for project ideas and plans, and I found very few sites offering free plans for beginners. So I decided to start my own.



                  If you are still looking for lathe or mill projects for the beginner, check out the site. Projects are broken down into Lathe or Mill and Beginner, Intermediate, or Advanced skill levels. Oh, and the best part - all the plans are FREE to download and you don't have to sign up or provide your email or any other info.

                  Let me know what you think of the site and good luck!
                  Tyler Youngblood
                  ProjectsInMetal.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I like the pages and projects Ishimura has put together. His pages are linked along with these excellent project pages:

                    http://www.home-machine-shop.com/projects/

                    And the Hemingway kits are an easy way to get the plans and materials in your shop quickly:

                    http://www.hemingwaykits.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You can turn in the mill by chucking a part on the spindle and using the vise as a toolholder as spope suggests. You can also use a boring head and reverse the boring bar and use it to turn OD's. I have done this on seveal occasions with parts too lagre to chuck in the lathe.

                      There are no rules in machining beyond those pertaining to safety. The only limiting factor is the imagination and ingenuity of the user.
                      Jim H.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by tyleryoungblood
                        I recently started a site (ProjectsInMetal.com) for exactly this reason, there seems to be a lack of good beginner metalworking projects on the web. Oddly, there are scores of woodworking projects everywhere - maybe because woodworking is a more common hobby?

                        When I fist started on the lathe I got all excited and googled for hours scouring the web for project ideas and plans, and I found very few sites offering free plans for beginners. So I decided to start my own.



                        If you are still looking for lathe or mill projects for the beginner, check out the site. Projects are broken down into Lathe or Mill and Beginner, Intermediate, or Advanced skill levels. Oh, and the best part - all the plans are FREE to download and you don't have to sign up or provide your email or any other info.

                        Let me know what you think of the site and good luck!
                        I would question the legality of the site's title as it was the previous title of what is now Machinist's Workshop. Village Press may still have a copyright on the name. If not it still seems a bit shabby to be trading on an established reputation.
                        Jim H.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Halls

                          I agree with Lazo having recently purchased Hall's books on Amazon. The only sticky point is thinking in metric..a bit distracting but not insurmountable.

                          Hall's milling book IMHO is excellent..lots of good projects that build on each other and the price for the books are very reasonable.

                          Steve

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JCHannum
                            I would question the legality of the site's title as it was the previous title of what is now Machinist's Workshop. Village Press may still have a copyright on the name. If not it still seems a bit shabby to be trading on an established reputation.
                            I thought a lot about the legal aspects of using the name, and I make it very clear in the "About" section of the site that ProjectsInMetal.com is in no way affiliated with PIM (the Magazine). I'm certainly not trying to step on anyone's toes, including Joe Rice (PIM's original editor).

                            The truth is, I was surprised the domain name was even available, and I assume that if Villiage Press was worried about the domain they wouldn't have let it go (or would have at least re-directed it to their current website).

                            My hope is to build an online community where people can feel free to share their plans with others. There are so many machinists out there with great projects and ideas, I just want to help provide a place to compile all the projects and plans into one easy-to-access place that doesn't require a membership to download, and doesn't charge money for the plans. I hope the machining community will embrace the idea and contribute to it.
                            Tyler Youngblood
                            ProjectsInMetal.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by tyleryoungblood
                              I recently started a site (ProjectsInMetal.com) for exactly this reason, there seems to be a lack of good beginner metalworking projects on the web. Oddly, there are scores of woodworking projects everywhere - maybe because woodworking is a more common hobby?

                              When I fist started on the lathe I got all excited and googled for hours scouring the web for project ideas and plans, and I found very few sites offering free plans for beginners. So I decided to start my own.



                              If you are still looking for lathe or mill projects for the beginner, check out the site. Projects are broken down into Lathe or Mill and Beginner, Intermediate, or Advanced skill levels. Oh, and the best part - all the plans are FREE to download and you don't have to sign up or provide your email or any other info.

                              Let me know what you think of the site and good luck!
                              That kicks ass, dont listen to the old farts. You own the Domain do any damn thing you want.

                              The Coffee Cup Stirling Engine is a must build. I like that.

                              Comment

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