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Made first lathe part ever

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  • Made first lathe part ever

    I got the VFD wired up and wanted to spin the rear pulleys on my SB 9" Type R but I didn't have a V belt to fit. I wanted to spin them so I could get the rust off with scotchbrite. I did the headstock pulleys by hand and it wasn't any fun.

    I figured having a loop of something the same size as the needed belt to take to the auto parts store would be good so I wrapped about 8 loops of electrical tape between the V-pulley on the motor and the flat drive wheel and made sure they were stuck together. 3M brand tape.

    It worked so well I made some facing and chamfering cuts in a 1/2 Al rod after cleaning the pulleys. I was pretty surprised the tape held.

    The drive belt that goes to the headstock has interleaving metal rings that were joined by some kind of fiber rod. I had to clip the rod between the rings to get it out. 12 AWG Solid copper with the insulation on was a perfect fit to put it back together. I have some NOS ones but this one is old and slick and I think I need that for now.

    Kevin

  • #2
    let the chipmaking begin. fun ain;t it ? after the snow and crap you can get what you really need to make it permenent. . . enjoy !

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    • #3
      Just wrap some more tape on that improvised belt and go to it!!

      Chips are good. You can't have just one!

      Pete
      1973 SB 10K .
      BenchMaster mill.

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      • #4
        Congratulations!

        That flat belt is put together with what is known as "belt lacing" and you will likely find a bearing/drive shop that can still install belt lacing if needed. I bought an old piece of conveyer belting for use on a workbench top and pulled and pitched a long piece of thatfiber rod used for joining two sections...too bad or I would have sent it to you.

        Evan and others may chime in as many use a rubber serpentine automotive type belt for better traction and ease. I don't remember if they have to disassemble the headstock or if they are able to lace that or perhaps cut and then re-join it with cyanoacrylate adhesive??

        Paul
        Paul Carpenter
        Mapleton, IL

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        • #5
          Blet lacing can be sourced with a google search for flat transmission belt lacing, or Alligator lacing. It has a unique sound on a lathe drive click, whirrrr,click, whirrr, repeat....

          My antique Barnes has two splices in its main belt.....
          Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

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          • #6
            Thanks for the advice and encouragement. I'm using the belt it came with which is beat and was oily. I wiped it down with some degreaser since I have two more that are unused. I figure traction is not something I need to start. Once I know my way around the serpetine belt sounds great and taking the spindle out is a piece of cake on this thing so the belts that are already loops with slip on fine.

            I ran the spindle with the bearing bolts finger tight and plenty of proper spindle oil. Is that reasonable? I have yet to do the South Bend recommended clearance test but will soon.

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            • #7
              I don't know about the 9, but the 13" my Dad has uses a unique bearing adjustment. The screw, when tightened pulls up on a sort of key that catches the edge of two halves of the bearing cap. By pulling up on the two edges, effectively the bearing changes shape. If I understand correctly then, tightening that screw may actually serve to loosen the fit of the bearing to the spindle. Its worth looking at it close (and I don't have one here) to see how it really adjusts.

              Proper gauging for the adjustment will leave the bearings warm but not hot after a good bit of running. The right spindle oil is important. I belive they call for a "light" (#10?) spindle oil for those. Too thick and it won't distribute itself into the desired even film very well. The spindle rides on this film and not the bearing material....if the film is correct and the adjustment are correct. Others with more direct experience will likely chime in on the bearing adjustment.

              It may be good for you to pull it apart since more than one story of a chip or two imbedded in bearing caps has come up. Left there, it will groove your spindle.

              Paul
              Paul Carpenter
              Mapleton, IL

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              • #8
                I think I read about that design. I think read they if you don't take it apart properly you really damage it.

                This particular model has a simple two piece bearing which I think I have seen listed as bronze. The top center of each cap has a gits cup. The bearings are already scored, they feel like the surface of an LP if you run your nail across. The mating spindle surface feels the same way.

                At cabin fever a guy had a box of Heavy 10 spindles for $15 each that looked pretty nice but nothing like that for this model.

                I'm interested in getting some automatic oilers with sight glasses for the these two bearing caps to help insure that the bearings are not damaged further. (And they look cool) Anybody think that would be helpful?

                Thanks,

                Kevin

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                • #9
                  If the bearing fit is good, I don't know that they loose enough to make a bigger reservoir worth it. Gits oil cups are really just a small automatic oiler. With the auto oilers, you may find that you forget to flip the lever on top to turn them off and you get a surprise puddle some day. Worse yet, forget to turn it on, and you run it dry. I wonder if they would be a big swarf catcher too. I would still make sure to have the felts in place to keep swarf in either the Gits cups or automaitic oilers from getting to the bearings.

                  Paul
                  Paul Carpenter
                  Mapleton, IL

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