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  • Baby Steps (no pun intended)

    I hate google. You have to give youself an education just to figure out what words to use and what you really discover is just how many ways what you asked for can be interpreted in terms of everything other than what you wanted....so here I am having to humble myself and pester those who Im sure have better things to do than trifle with my newbie questions......

    How do you feed cutting fluid on your work and not make a mess of everything (slides and all). I saw a used cross slide on ebay with the top slide formed into a pan but that looked like trash and havent been able to find anything else like that.

    ....Im picturing a chorus of laughter. Hopefully my first try doesnt get me kicked off. Would it help if I bought a subscription?

  • #2
    Welcome to the ZOO

    I can't believe that no one has answered you yet.

    I just use an oil can to feed cutting oil, let it collect in the chip pan, or where ever the chips and oil fall. Wear old clothes. keep plenty of cleaner available for the safety glasses.

    A subscription to the mag is not necessary but the mag does have a lot of good info in each issue. I for one would recommend getting it.

    Ross
    GUNS Don't kill people
    Drivers using cell phones do.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by dirtpounder

      How do you feed cutting fluid on your work and not make a mess of everything (slides and all).

      in my experience you don't.

      if your doing the same thing every time just put up guards. but with most hsm work it is hit and miss. one of the best ideas i have seen was a clear shower curtain on a small round hoop that would go just around the head and table. that is what i plan to do when i finnish my cnc conversion of my m head. now i just let it fly.

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      • #4
        Welcome to the asylum

        It's not possible to not make a mess,it's what rags are for

        Seriously though a brush is good for cutting oil like used in single point threading and coolant,well it just goes places.Some pieces of clear Lexan with some magnets attahed to the bottom edge work as see through deflectors/directors.
        I just need one more tool,just one!

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        • #5
          Thanks all! I love you already! It really ISNT just me!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by wierdscience
            Seriously though a brush is good for cutting oil like used in single point threading and coolant,well it just goes places.Some pieces of clear Lexan with some magnets attahed to the bottom edge work as see through deflectors/directors.
            This works really well.. one of those really cheap Chinese magnetic indicator stands Enco/Harbor Freight put on sale a lot w/ a piece of clear Lexan bolted on does the trick... and keeps the smoking hot blue ones from landing in my beard ...
            Bart Smaalders
            http://smaalders.net/barts

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            • #7
              Assuming you are a 'homeshopper' then I'm with the rest of the group and dont feel the need for flood coolant. Youve already pointed out some of the drawbacks...

              Dribble bottles with 2-3 different things -- Kerosene/WD for Aluminun. a cutting oil, threading oil, etc will get you through a lot of situations, maybe a squirt bottle or 2 with similar setups, and of course the ever faithful small paintbrush with whatever in a container.

              If you really wanna get more than this, look at one of the misting setups like Koolmist, these can do a lot of cooling and have very little mess.
              If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

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              • #8
                Bill Pace said:
                If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

                .....oh I see. If everythings going well then something must be wrong! My Dad used to tell me that....

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                • #9
                  yep some times oil gets every where, i use a cheap flux brush, recommended by Fred, works well. when parting i hold a squirt bottle over the grove and let it drip in. as for the oil slinging off of the part, stand to the side a little. you should check out this site from one of our members. great info
                  http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/
                  Last edited by quadrod; 01-31-2009, 09:50 AM.

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                  • #10
                    I’m of the belief “you do need cutting fluid, aka: mother’s milk” from time to time, and given your tools will last up to 5 X longer using it, its best to get used to it now.

                    Barts had one of the best ideas I’ve seen for the Home shop guy who occasionally has to use it. I’ve used scrap card board, rags, pieces of angle-iron, what ever is handy to try and contain it. I also prefer a synthetic cutting fluid as I can add water to rejuvenate the mixture in between infrequent use.

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                    • #11
                      A couple more points, keep rags away from spinning objects, paper towels work and don't drag your hand into areas where you get hurt. two a paint stirring stick is a good tool to push swarf off the lathe, an acid brush works good to feed a small amount of oil on the thread or cut off tool. On normal turning or milling I don't use cooling oil, it is easier (for me at least) to grind the tool more often. My old instructor always said there were more dumb answers than dumb questions.
                      re
                      Herm Williams

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