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A nice precision Benchtop Drill Press.

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  • A nice precision Benchtop Drill Press.

    My good friend Rube and I did a little machine trading yesterday. He is now in possession of the cnc lathe I built (minus a few parts ) and I am the new owner of this small Drill press.

    I did some research and from what I can tell this company was still in business a few years ago but their website is now down.
    The original patent goes back to 1922 and was a flat belt machine pretty similar to this one.
    The company name is High Speed Hammer out of New York.
    This is a very nice small drill press IMO. It has a very good feel and is very well built. It's meant for small drill sizes but this little guy weighs in at just under 120lbs!
    The machine has a tag on it from Airguide Instrument co. Which is also now out of business.

    Have any of you guys seen or own one of these machines?

    Rube's Father was the last owner of this machine and he did a great job restoring it. He was a wood worker Rube tells me, but judging by the beautifully built aluminum table and fence he made for this machine, he was also quite skilled working with metal.
    Rube's Dad passed away last year and I'm very honored to be the new owner of this high quality machine.
    Thanks Rube!
    Steve




  • #2



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    • #3
      A scan from their tool catalog from I think 1927, of one of the earlier versions on the drill press.


      Steve

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      • #4
        I live near Rochester, never heard of High Speed Hammer. Too bad, another example of how Rochester used to have a life outside of Kodak and Xerox.

        Is is possible they were purchased by someone? If I had a location other than Rochester (such as a street address) I could do some checking in the historical files.
        This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
        Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
        Plastic Operators Dot Com

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        • #5
          Very nice,
          Does it have the two speeds as the spec sheet reads?
          Ted

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          • #6
            We have several of the "new" versions of that drill press where I work. Work real nice for small holes.....

            I bought a rotary wire stripping machine from them (now called HSH Automation, or something like that) a couple of years ago. Who ever owned it was also involved in some kind of high-performance car or motorcycle stuff.

            Hope that helps

            Craig

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            • #7
              Everywhere I worked and most shops I have visited in Rochester have one or more of those. they were usually guarded by the guys that worked in the shop and shown a lot of respect. In a couple of cases senior staff would have one on there bench and no one else used it. I have seen them with flat belts and with a stepped pulley and a round belt like a oversized O ring. Your table is a addition, A nice one. I think the tensioner is as well.

              Nice find.

              Also from Rochester

              Frank

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              • #8
                Thanks for the info guys!

                I found a little more relevant info-
                Here is an archived webpage describing a more current version of the r53 drill press from 2001.
                http://web.archive.org/web/200105042...illpresses.htm
                "The R-53 is built to Federal Specifications OO-D-676A, with some extras the R-53 is a class 10 machine."
                The machine looks very similar to this one but with a more modern motor.

                Another excerpt from the archived website-
                "

                The High Speed Hammer Company was formed in 1915, approximately 85 years ago. It is a privately held company based in Rochester, NY and services customers worldwide.
                Initially, riveting machines and tooling were the primary products for the company. Over the years, precision drilling machines, wire stripping machines, automatic optical screwdrivers and the increasing emphasis on the design and build of automated assembly machines were added.

                Liger, I found this address-
                313 Norton Street
                Rochester, NY 14621

                A lot more info on the company at this link and a pic of the building. http://web.archive.org/web/200108020...m/abouthsh.htm

                Maybe they are still around? The archived webpages stop at feb 2008 though.

                mototed,
                that was a much earlier spec sheet. This one has originally a 4speed belt setup. The motor pulley is not stock right now. I plan on turning a new solid aluminum 4 spd drive pulley for the machine.
                Speeds for the 2001 model were- 750, 1500, 3000, 6000 RPM
                Might be a cool machine to put a 3ph motor and VFD on..Maybe some day.

                Steve

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                • #9
                  I was wrong. The belt adj idler is stock. I found this
                  http://www.owwm.com/photoindex/images/3014-A.jpg
                  http://www.owwm.com/photoindex/detail.aspx?id=3014

                  Frank

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                  • #10
                    Frank,
                    Great info!

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                    • #11
                      Ok I can go with that.

                      Google Maps still lists High Speed Hammer at that location... Might venture out there later this week.

                      Since the webpages stop Feb 2008 one thing to consider is maybe they just let the page expire as an unnecessary expense?

                      Google Maps also shows the phone-number of (585) 266-6740... Notice the change in area code if you decide to call them.

                      That said, looking through their web-page it sounds like they were one of the companies founded to manufacture a doo-dad for one of the Big Three. "Optical Screw Driver" was used to assemble eye-glasses, sun-glasses specifically... That means Bausch And Lomb.

                      I suspect, given industrial history around here they started out doing general manufacturing across all sectors making equipment for everyone... then they more or less threw their lot in with one of the Big Three manufacturing and servicing specialty equipment for them.

                      As the fortunes of the Big Three waned so did they. We had several big automation and machine builders go through this. Rapidac was one. Liberty was another....

                      Argh I wish I had more time to putter around doing research on this. The above is pure speculation based on previous research so take it as you will in the absense of facts.
                      This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
                      Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
                      Plastic Operators Dot Com

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                      • #12
                        Might venture out there later this week.
                        Thankyou for the offer Liger, no need to though. I think we now have plenty of history on this machine.

                        Steve

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                        • #13
                          Well Steve...I wouldn't let it go to just anyone, as you know. The history seems pretty fascinating thus far. I know it will live a full and useful life in your "working museum" of old high quality machines. Have fun with it my friend!!!!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by S_J_H
                            Thankyou for the offer Liger, no need to though. I think we now have plenty of history on this machine.

                            Steve
                            What? And pass up the opportunity to possibly rummage through an abandoned machine-shop full of old machines and documents?! Are you DAFT or something?

                            Note: Do not attempt to rummage through abandoned machine-shops without permission.
                            This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
                            Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
                            Plastic Operators Dot Com

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                            • #15
                              Yes sweet they don't make them like that anymore nice little table too well done I hope both parties are happy.regards Alistair
                              Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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