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Keller 1A Die Filer

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  • Keller 1A Die Filer

    My latest shop aquisition. Couldn't pass it up for $50!

    Anyone have any info on this brand or model? Manuals, etc.? No files, unfortunately, but a quick look at some of the other die-filer threads notes that Victor and Federal both have files in stock. Anyone have a favorite or recommended shape or style?









    Needs some work and cleanup- and probably a fresh coat of paint- but it turns, there's no damage or old repairs, and only very mild surface rust on the upright and table top.

    Doc.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

  • #2
    Thats to Die for!

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    • #3
      That looks like the one I got last month. When you figure out how to use it let me know! Mine is on the shelf and is about two other projects away from being touched, though I have a paying gig next week where it would be nice to have running.

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      • #4
        timely.

        I just got the same one.

        I have a 2nd overarm, i think for a light. also I dont fully understand how the overarm works. the bend rod that is adjustable, I assume that it is a hold-down for the work. the spring loaded guide part, no idea. maybe i have the wrong type of file in mine? is it suppose to attach to the file somehow? Right now, just have a file stickin up through the table, the overarm/spring part seems to serve no purpose? if anyone knows, enlighten me!
        "Good judgment comes from experience, and often experience comes from bad judgment" R.M.Brown

        My shop tour www.plastikosmd.com

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        • #5
          Originally posted by plastikosmd
          timely.

          the overarm/spring part seems to serve no purpose? if anyone knows, enlighten me!
          Saw blade.

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          • #6
            you are missing the plain overarm with roller that is used mainly with the 8" files. It is still available from the manufacturer.

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            • #7
              Good deal on the die filer. Keller is still around and still sells parts.



              Note that they only now offer the roller top arm and no longer sell the spring loaded tensioner like you have, which is nice for long this files or saw blades.

              Here is an exploded diagram:



              Which reminds me, I have spare top arm Keller shaft and multiple roller bushings for overarm (28) if anyone needs them.

              Charles

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              • #8
                if anyone could snap a bit closer of a pic of the correct overarm for file use, that would be great..I will attempt to make one similar or at least break something trying
                "Good judgment comes from experience, and often experience comes from bad judgment" R.M.Brown

                My shop tour www.plastikosmd.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Doc,

                  I have/use a variety of files for mine, and find that I use every shape available to me. Mostly my unit is used for pattern work in brass, but I have used it for everything from replacement parts for Barney (our big ugly purple Minster press) to one off jig plates.

                  I use half round, triangle, and straight equaling bastard files in mine. I suppose a broader selection wouldn't be bad, but I've found this small set quite adequate.

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                  • #10
                    Would someone explain what a die filer is used for or is there a video out there showing its use. I have never been around a simular piece of equipment.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by crrmeyer
                      Which reminds me, I have spare top arm Keller shaft and multiple roller bushings for overarm (28) if anyone needs them.
                      -Definitely interested. Any chance you can shoot me a photo or two? I'm assuming it's like the one shown on the factory website; cast arm, with a round rod with a bushing at the end?

                      My E-mail is doc (at) docsmachine.com if you can fire a photo or two my way.

                      Thanks.

                      Rolland: Think of it as a small, slow belt sander that can also do inside closed holes.

                      All the machine does is move a file- a fairly normal file, except it cuts on the pull down- vertically in about a 1" stroke. But, think of all the places you might use a file on small parts. Deburring edges, rounding corners, filing a drilled round hole into a square one, turning an undersized hole into the round-with-flats hole you need for an electrical outlet, filing a keyway into a small pulley or gear, etc.

                      They're called "die" filers because that's what they used them for- making shaped punching dies. A round punch and die are easy lathe work. A square punch is easy mill work. The die filer is used to make the square hole for the matching die.

                      But for us home-shop or general-machine guys, think of it as a "power file", and apply to things that might otherwise get a hand file.

                      Doc.
                      Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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                      • #12
                        I've got one with both the simple over-arm and the spring loaded one. It's currently mounted with a mini-hacksaw blade for pseudo scroll saw use on metal. I had to modify the hold down feet because it kept want to lift the work piece, and you have to go slow or the spring retract won't work and you'll bend a blade.

                        It also runs a bit fast. I saw a post somewhere about slowing them down, and I think I agree that about 1/2 original speed would be a good thing most of the time. I'm thinking DC upgrade like the guys do on the mini lathes would work well...

                        And you can make your own files by starting with normal files of the appropriate size. Thing to keep in mind is that they cut on the down stroke. So if you want a 1/4" round file, you can get a standard 1/4" hand file with straight profile (like a saw blade file) and cut the tip end (opposite tang) off to the desired length. Then, depending on your mounting arrangement, you can grind down a new mounting tang on what used to be the end. I've got a box of swiss made die-filer files that I picked up cheap, but they are rather uncommon.
                        Russ
                        Master Floor Sweeper

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                        • #13
                          Doc
                          Thanks, There are many times I could use one. Guess I better start looking, never been around a shop that used one but now " I see the light "
                          Thats what happens when you are home schooled in machine work

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                          • #14
                            The spring loaded tensioner arm is used to mount saw blades. It is then used as a metal cutting jigsaw. The roller bushing arm is used to backup the files. I have a complete Keller die filer w/both arms, new files, blades & a stand for sale if interested.

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                            • #15
                              Would you mind posting a pic pic of the roller arm?

                              My non-spring arm has a horizontal hole the same size as the hold-down bar hole, and I always wondered what that was for. It also seems a bit shorter than it should be. Is that where the roller support mounts?
                              Russ
                              Master Floor Sweeper

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