Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

D.I.Y. On the truck rotor machining

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • D.I.Y. On the truck rotor machining



    See if I can get the 'putor to work...

    Harbor Freight tools at their finest.

  • #2
    That saves one h*ll of a lot of skinned knuckles and broken disc retaining bolts.

    Regards Ian.
    You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

    Comment


    • #3
      I trued up a big marine gearbox coupling flange a few months ago, using a small bench grinder mounted on one of those XY vices. Bench grinder was a bad choice, painfully slow, I reckon an angle grinder would have done a good enough job in a quarter of the time.
      Sadly don't have any pics, someone else took some but I've never seen them.I'll ask next time I see him.

      Tim

      Comment


      • #4
        I was waiting in line at Napa the other day and was flipping around in the catalog that they had there. But they sell a setup kinda similar to that. Theirs was $7k? Yours looks cheaper and probably works better. Nice job.

        How did they turn out (no pun intended)? Did you use a little grinder or is there a tool bit there? The photo is a bit small and I cant find my glasses.

        rock~
        Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

        Comment


        • #5
          "But they sell a setup kinda similar to that. Theirs was $7k? Yours looks cheaper and probably works better"

          Well, it was definitly cheaper, but the store bought units
          (I believe) are built to be universal, to fit most everything.

          I felt that a lathe tool would require more ridigity than I could muster,
          so hence the slower, but easier grinding wheel.

          Cost's:
          1. x-y cross slide vice-H.F. special $40
          2. Die grinder-H.F. special $20
          3. Motor (1/4 h.p. 1140 rpm)-scrounge
          4. Brackets-scrounge & weld

          Comment


          • #6
            Rockrat,
            Hold your Ctrl key down while you work the scroll wheel on your mouse, that will expand the photo so you can see the detail in what dirty doug did to build his rotor grinder.
            Digger doug,
            How is your device attached to the vehicle?

            Comment


            • #7
              That's crafty as all get out digger How did you go about getting it lined up with the surface to cut it straight across? A dial indicator?
              It's only ink and paper

              Comment


              • #8
                Did I hear someone mention carnival ride?
                Ingenious but I'm with Carl--How do you monitor the parallelism of the rotor? I've not known the HF cross vise to move in straight lines perpendicular to each axis. At least the two I have don't.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I think it wouldn't matter much once the pads bedded-in, so long as the disc was running true.
                  Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                  Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                  Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                  Monarch 10EE 1942

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Doug how did they come out? Can you post some figures on TIR, DTV etc.
                    Last edited by luthor; 02-27-2009, 06:29 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Timleech
                      I trued up a big marine gearbox coupling flange a few months ago, using a small bench grinder mounted on one of those XY vices.
                      My dad once used a similar setup to resurface the cable drum clutch and brake drums on a couple of Bay City backhoes. The slide was originally a motor mount for belt tensioning. Dad was an excellent crane and backhoe operator and understood mechanics, but his early metalworking skills were limited to the skillful use of the gas axe. Still, he produced excellent results grinding the drums with his cobbled together setup.
                      Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                      ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Great idea. You get bonus points for doing it in the snow!

                        Rob

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          "Doug how did they come out? Can you post some figures on TIR, DTV etc."

                          Well, I only did the one side (driver's side).

                          It is smooth, and doesn't pulse the pedal at all now.

                          Did I mention it was maybe 15 f ? outside, on the top of
                          a large hill, with a stiff (english call it a lazy) breeze ?

                          No, I didn't check the t.i.r., I will next time, and work more on
                          the finish, need a harder, skinnier wheel. for less wear,
                          and skinnier for less tool pressure.

                          It was basically get it done, and pull the %^$#! fixture off
                          as soon as possible, to get out of the %%$#[email protected]#! cold,
                          get the caliper and tire back on, and get the truck ready
                          for a friday vacation day to haul a lathe.

                          Mission accomplished, cleveland to erie, 10,500 lbs
                          on trailer...W&S 1AB.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Now we need pictures of the lathe. JIM
                            jim

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X