Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Beaver Milling machine

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Beaver Milling machine

    I'm going to be look at a Beaver mill on Saturday (not sure of the model). I'd like to hear from people who know this machine. I'm curious what I should look for when inspecting it, anything special or unique to this mill.

    Thanks.
    Brett Jones...

  • #2
    I'd like to see some beaver.........sounds like it would be more suited for wood.......sorry couldn't resist.........
    Opportunity knocks once, temptation leans on the doorbell.....

    Comment


    • #3
      Is it a Mk1 or a MkII machine???
      Precision takes time.

      Comment


      • #4
        http://www.lathes.co.uk/beaver/
        Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

        Comment


        • #5
          Better than a Bridgeport!!!

          This was told to me Years ago by mt Machinist Master, David who was the best milling machine Operator i have ever Met. He said the Beaver (yeah the Milling Machine Guys) was one of the most reliable Machines ,Mills he ever worked on. Other milld bridgeport would require some maintenance but the Beaver Mill soldiered on. he always sid it was one of the best made I ran a Beaver mill Large Model years ago and it was smooth and ran nice. I wish i had one instead of my 1960 vintage Bridgeport serial Number 370 LOL old but still making tons of chips.

          Comment


          • #6
            Beaver Mill

            I own a Beaver model PAL. A very solid machine even if it may be 40 years old. I'm very happy with it in my home shop.
            Gary

            Comment


            • #7
              I have a Beaver VBRP, not the varispeed (that would have been nice, but not essential) with a 40 Int taper. They also come with 30 Int's, which is really too light for the machine.

              Check the table power feed works, and check for play in the table when it's at mid travel.

              Brilliant machine!

              Ian
              All of the gear, no idea...

              Comment


              • #8
                Nice machines, they are on a par with the Elliot's, TOS and Ajax.
                Very well built.
                Given that most are 3 phase the step speed model with VFD is a better bet than the varispeed given there is less to wear out and jangle around.

                Later varispeeds had hydraulic control which could be messy.

                About the only problem that seems to occur regularly is the rapid feed on the table, this is a step up pair of gears from the traverse box that seem to get overloaded for the ratio they have to pull and strip the dogs.
                No spares and the best dodge is to replace one gear with a spacer and just use the normal range of feeds, Elliot's suffered the same problem.

                .
                .

                Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                Comment


                • #9
                  Up until a few years ago the Royal Navy had a Type 22 frigate named HMS Beaver. American sailors were always incredulous....'You got a ship called Beaver?'

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    An I'll bet going to the heads Really blew them.
                    You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by John Stevenson
                      Nice machines, they are on a par with the Elliot's, TOS and Ajax..
                      John, the Beaver is actually several hundred pounds lighter than the Excello, which has a much stouter knee. The TOS is much bigger/heavier than the Excello...

                      Bridgeport: 1900 lbs
                      Beaver Mk II VBRP: 2138 lbs
                      Lagun FTV-1: 2750 lbs
                      Excello 602: 2900 lbs.
                      TOS FNK 25: 3740 lbs
                      Last edited by lazlo; 03-04-2009, 11:05 AM.
                      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I had a TOS FNK 25, very rigid and powerful mill. I found it very unergonomic for the work I do. I much prefer my Bridgeport.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by lazlo
                          John, the Beaver is actually several hundred pounds lighter than the Excello, which has a much stouter knee. The TOS is much bigger/heavier than the Excello...

                          Bridgeport: 1900 lbs
                          Beaver Mk II VBRP: 2138 lbs
                          Lagun FTV-1: 2750 lbs
                          Excello 602: 2900 lbs.
                          TOS FNK 25: 3740 lbs

                          Elliott 1250 Omnimil (with turret and horizontal spindle) 4020 lbs.
                          (I know cos I just moved one in, see the earlier 'damn Bridgeport' thread )
                          ebay item 300288214066
                          Nice machine

                          Tim

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Well I bought the machine. It's now sitting on pipes in my shop waiting for a clean up and for me to decide where in the shop it's going to live.

                            It's a VBRP with a 10x48 table. The prior owner was using R8 collets in it, but I'm not sure if it has a 30 to R8 adapter of some sort or if it's originally R8. I'll snap some pics of the quill and post them. The head sounds tight and I was able to make some cuts with it before I purchased it. Other than the expected wear of a 40+ year old machine the only things wrong with it are the loose dials and the missing table power feed.

                            Does anyone know of an electronic copy of the manual for this machine? Most of the controls are self explanatory, but I'm not sure how to engage the quill fine feed (perhaps it's broken). I'd also like a better explanation of the power feed for the quill.

                            My wife and kids were a bit surprised by it's size. This machine is replacing a Grizzly X3 which is the only vertical milling machine they've ever seen.

                            Loading during pickup was with a forklift. Offloading was via tilt trailer, pipe rollers and come-along, through a 12'x10' door. How you people who put machinery into basements though bulkhead doors manage is beyond me.

                            Thanks for everyone's comments.
                            Brett Jones...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by bhjones
                              The prior owner was using R8 collets in it, but I'm not sure if it has a 30 to R8 adapter of some sort or if it's originally R8.
                              Never seen a Beaver with R8, chances are it's INT30 and he just put an R8 into the spindle as the tapers are very close.

                              Way to check is release the R8 and withdraw about 1/2 then try to wobble it around.
                              If it wobbles it's INT30, if not it's R8, reason being INT 30 has no parallel part directly above the taper but relies on a longer taper than the R8.

                              R8 has a shorter taper and a parallel part for support.

                              Side note INT30, R8 and ER32 all have tapers that are very close to each other but none are directly interchangeable.

                              .
                              .

                              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X