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Question about dividing plates

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  • #16
    Yeah sorry for dragging your thread off-topic ClintonH. It WOULD be pretty cool to produce a rotary table with a digital readout though. Shame that electronics is one of my weakest points, I reckon that a simple controller and a mouse encoder could produce pretty good results, perhaps by gearing the encoder wheel for extra resolution.
    Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

    Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
    Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
    Monarch 10EE 1942

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    • #17
      No problem on going off topic, it's all learning and that's what I need right now.
      So would it be better to try and build my own or are these cheap enough that I should just pick them up and build additional plates latter as I need them? Anyone good with CAD and has some spare time..?

      Clinton

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      • #18
        If you are considering purchasing plates, I would suggest these. They are made by John Stevenson and sold by his wife. They have the standard holes plus 25, 63 & 127 which adds the most commonly needed divisions not covered by the standard plates. He leaves a margin to permit additional divisions at a later date should that prove necessary.

        http://www.metoolsonline.com/product...products_id=55
        Jim H.

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        • #19
          ClintonH, You can if you want build your own plates, A book called "The Shop Wisdom Of Philip Duclos" sold by our host's here (Village Press) has a very good artical on building your own 40-1 dividing head and gives a few different ways to drill the plates.

          A much better book IMO is written by George H. Thomas titled "Workshop Techniques" ISBN 1 85761 106 3 gives a very clever way to drill the plates on the dividing head itself, Altho this is for a 60-1 head. the principle would still be the same. If you buy this book I would also buy George's other book "The Model Engineers Workshop Manual" ISBN 1 85761 000 8, I probably have over 200 books on machining and if I had to choose the two best books, His two books are what I would pick.

          But if you value your time the plates John Stevenson sells are the best deal going.

          Pete

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          • #20
            Originally posted by doctor demo
            I wonder with all the cut-price DRO's/digital calipers that are able to be produced nowadays why someone hasn't applied the technology to produce a rotary table with a digital display for a modest price? Is there a limitation to the technology that prevents it?
            Thanks Peter, I guess there is no point in going to the patent office....now that You put My idea on the net .
            I actually posted pictures of that exact setup here a couple of years back: rotary encoders output common quadrature signals, so I dropped an MT3 center/drawbar doodad I made into my Yuasa rotab, which is threaded 1/2-13. I shaft-clamped a Heidenhain optical rotary encoder on the drawbar, and hooked up the output to a cheap ($40) Red Lion quadrature display. Instant rotab DRO.

            You can see the top of the MT3 drawbar adapter here:



            ..and this is the Red Lion CUB5 quadrature display/totalizer I use:

            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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            • #21
              Originally posted by JCHannum
              If you are considering purchasing plates, I would suggest these. They are made by John Stevenson and sold by his wife. They have the standard holes plus 25, 63 & 127 which adds the most commonly needed divisions not covered by the standard plates.
              Those are the standard Myford dividing head plates, which are 5.7" in diameter: they're too big for the Ellis and Carrol dividing heads, which use 5" plates.

              The ubiquitous Chinese dividing head plates, like the BusyBee plates the OP linked, are 5", and will fit most home-shop sized dividing heads and rotary tables.
              "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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              • #22
                Dividing plates

                I'd second the comments from 'uncle Pete' about George Thomas's approach.
                My 'one hole' plate was from his deliberations. So was 'my' parting off comments.

                Presently, I am sort of into George's old 'brother' from NZ and making a new improved top slide for my ancient Myford. That is the Jack Radford book which sort of compliments and complements GHT's writings. GHT visited Jack and brought home to the UK, a lot of his writings on dividing and graduating.

                The nicest thing about GHT is that he doesn't flannel, but tells you blow by blow what to do.

                Cheers

                Norm

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                • #23
                  ClintonH is considering building his own dividing head, and is not restricted to any particular size at this point of the game. Designing it to accomodate the larger plates would not present any particular problem and the added hole counts John's plates provide would be a worthwhile consideration.
                  Jim H.

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