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Finally Completed my Way OT Project

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  • Finally Completed my Way OT Project

    I know this project is WAY Off-Topic but I had to post it to give you all some idea of big project on which I have been working.

    Back in 1993, I took a week long, hands-on course in carving of carousel horses and I started my horse then. At that time I was working full-time and the project was shuttled into a corner to have a place for dust to settle and not touched for many, many years.

    In Feb 2008, our first grandchildren were born, identical twin girls. I decided to turn my much unfinished carousel horse into a rocking horse for the girls and any other grand children that may be coming. Since I now was retired, and I had the time, I went back to work on the horse. I figured that if I got busy on it, I would have it done while there were children and not completed when they are teens! Pictured below are the results of about 1,900 hours of work.







    This horse was my very first wood carving effort and I think it turned out very well. The wood used was basswood as it an excellent wood for carving. The parts are made from many smaller pieces of wood glued together to form the parts and to ensure the wood grain is properly oriented. The body is hollow while the head, neck, tail and legs are solid. The horse is 56” tall from the floor to the top of the mane on the head and the rocking base is 74” from end to end. The color paints are acrylic and it has about total of 12 to 15 coats of primer, color and sealer. It is going to be kept at Grandpa’s and Grandma’s house for the grandchildren to play with while they visit.

    Now I can get back and spend full-time on the restoration of my SB 13” lathe!

    Thanks for looking.
    Bill

    Being ROAD KILL on the Information Super Highway and Electronically Challenged really SUCKS!!

    Every problem can be solved through the proper application of explosives, duct tape, teflon, WD-40, or any combo of the aforementioned items.

  • #2
    That is an extraordinary project! You are very talented!!

    I am sure your rocking horse will now be a very proud family Heirloom.

    Steve

    Comment


    • #3
      Thats unreal, its beyond anything I can imagine doing -- 1900 hours -- you have the patients of Jobe --- your work is perfect,
      The hillbilly engineer is hollering at me and asking how those feet are anchored to the base wood, Due to the horse being in the prancing mode and there being not only just three feet but barely a "stance" sideways between them -- Im not seeing fore and aft problems at all, but do hope when the kids are "horsing around" with getting off and on and stuff that she holds her own with those forces, Of course -- I may be thinking of how me and my brothers beat the crap out of our rocking horse and your grandkids might actually be "normal" children (normal meaning riding one at a time without weapons and such)

      Good duty.

      Comment


      • #4
        Bill, that is a great looking horse. I'm sure your proud of it. I'm sure the rest of the guys don't care if it's "Off Topic" or not either. Most here can appreciate the work that went into it even if it is something they may never undertake. That is the great thing about this forum, the varied talents from all of the members. Got a question about woodworking, electronics, photography, metal working or anything else, chances are good that somebody here can help. Thanks for sharing.
        Jonathan P.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by A.K. Boomer
          The hillbilly engineer is hollering at me and asking how those feet are anchored to the base wood, Due to the horse being in the prancing mode and there being not only just three feet but barely a "stance" sideways between them.
          Boomer,

          The horse is bolted to the rocking frame by three 7/16" bolts. The bottom of each hoove was hollowed out enough to accomadate a 1.5" square plate of 1/8" steel. The center of this plate drilled with a 1/2" hole and each corner had a countersunk hole for the attaching the plate to the bottom of the hoof with wood screws. A 7/16" nut was centered over the 1/2" hole and welded to the back of the plate. The plate with the nut welded on the back was put into the hollowed out hoof, ensuring that it was flush to the bottom of the hoof. The four wood screws secured the plate in place. Under each hoof is a piece from a rubber inner tube to prevent any metal plate/rocking base contact and proved cushioning.

          The method to locate the holes in rocking base was done with 7/16" set screws. The set screws were screwed into each hoof with the point facing out. The horse was centered on the base and pressure was used to force the points of the set screws into the wood. The indentations were then drilled and the bolts inserted from the bottom and screwed into the nuts in the bottom of each hoof.
          Last edited by BigBoy1; 03-08-2009, 01:00 PM.
          Bill

          Being ROAD KILL on the Information Super Highway and Electronically Challenged really SUCKS!!

          Every problem can be solved through the proper application of explosives, duct tape, teflon, WD-40, or any combo of the aforementioned items.

          Comment


          • #6
            rocking horse

            that my friend is a beautiful piece of work destined to be handed down to generations of kids and the stories about"grandpa built that".congrats on a
            great job!

            Comment


            • #7
              Damn nice job! If you ever get up to Niagara Falls NY, not far from there is the City of Tonawanda. They have an old Merry Go Round factory rebuilt and volunteers there carve these horses.

              Here's there web page which sucks compared to the actual museum.
              - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
              Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

              It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by BigBoy1
                Boomer,

                The horse is bolted to the rocking frame by three 7/16" bolts. The bottom of each hoove was hollowed out enough to accomadate a 1.5" square plate of 1/8" steel. The center of this plate drilled with a 1/2" hole and each corner had a countersunk hole for the attaching the plate to the bottom of the hoof with wood screws. A 7/16" nut was centered over the 1/2" hole and welded to the back of the plate. The plate with the nut welded on the back was put into the hollowed out hoof, ensuring that it was flush to the bottom of the hoof. The four wood screws secured the plate in place. Under each hoof is a piece from a rubber inner tube to prevent any metal plate/rocking base contact and proved cushioning.

                The method to locate the holes in rocking base was done with 7/16" set screws. The set screws were screwed into each hoof with the point facing out. The horse was centered on the base and pressure was used to force the points of the set screws into the wood. The indentations were then drilled and the bolts inserted from the bottom and screwed into the nuts in the bottom of each hoof.

                You've almost convinced me that it would hold me and 6 of my brothers, although some of us have gained a little weight since then...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Bigboy that is wonderful!!! I know that my grandkids would be thrilled with that!

                  Originally posted by Your Old Dog
                  Here's there web page which sucks compared to the actual museum.
                  YOD...you forgot to post the link
                  Ernie (VE7ERN)

                  May the wind be always at your back

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hey Grandad, that's just awesome
                    The difficult done right away. the impossible takes a little time.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      That is totally awsome! A few years back we visited the Richland Carrousel Park in Mansfield OH. We were lucky enough to get a tour of the shop where they carve the horses and I can appreicated all the effort you put into the project.

                      Thanks for sharing and I echo the sentiment that all sorts of creativity are welcome here.


                      http://www.richlandcarrousel.com/

                      Errol Groff
                      Errol Groff

                      New England Model Engineering Society
                      http://neme-s.org/

                      YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/GroffErrol?feature=mhee

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I can't even carve good slivers .
                        That is one fine piece of work with the documentation the great great grandkids could probably turn that into a small fortune if Antiques Roadshow is still on .

                        Steve

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Sharp as a tack!! Great Work

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Very nice!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              You have two very fortunate grandchildren.

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