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OT: Prospecting the Moon from my back yard

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  • OT: Prospecting the Moon from my back yard

    I took some images of the almost full moon last night using my telescope and the Canon 300D. When I studied them I noticed a trace of color so I enhanced it.

    Without enhancement the moon looks like this:



    The same image with the color saturation boosted looks like this:



    Upon doing some research it turns out the blue areas are rich in titanium while the pink areas are poor in titanium and iron. That was confirmed on site by the lunar landing missions.
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  • #2
    That's interesting Evan. No wonder they want to mine the moon.
    It's only ink and paper

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    • #3
      There are a lot more color indicators that can be brought out but I selected only those colors because otherwise it is a complete mish-mash. I don't know why I haven't heard of this. Most likely I have but had forgotten.

      I will be off line a good part of the day. I have to see the dentist...
      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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      • #4
        I have to laugh because "enhance" is the term used in all these idiotic tv shows where they can magically take a low-resoution shot from a cheap security camera and make the license plate completely readable

        You do have to wonder, however, about the accuracy of saturating color that is present in an image taken from earth. The light passes through our atmosphere and I would think that what makes it the many miles to the surface is probably well "filtered". What's left to enhance would (I would think) not accurately reflect the spectrum thats actually being reflected from the surface. For example, our atmosphere turns the ambient light we get from the sun very blue...and I don't know that that accurately reflects the actual spectrum that's being radiated into space.

        Edit-- of course, now that I think about it a bit more, its not the absolute color values that are important. Rather its just the distinctions in reflectivity between the different areas.

        Paul
        Last edited by pcarpenter; 03-09-2009, 11:49 AM.
        Paul Carpenter
        Mapleton, IL

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        • #5
          As it happens, the pass band of the atmosphere in the range from UV to IR, namely the visible spectrum, is remarkably flat. There are no significant deviations through the entire visible spectrum from a flat pass band profile. This means that not only is the relative color difference useful but the absolute color is also quantifiable and meaningful.

          As for the atmosphere turning light blue, that isn't what happens. It merely preferentially scatters blue light but the same amount of blue makes it to the ground as does green and red. The measured proportions of red, green and blue energy are very closely correlated to the emitted values of the solar spectrum.
          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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          • #6
            Evan, don't you have a die-grinder in your workshop? All you need is some scotchbrite discs and a steady hand. That'll save you from going to the horror that is the dentist.
            This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
            Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
            Plastic Operators Dot Com

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            • #7
              Those are WiFi hotspots.

              We are not alone.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by john hobdeclipe
                Those are WiFi hotspots.

                We are not alone.
                I thought they were future Starbucks locations.

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                • #9
                  You were talking in another thread about changing the firmware in a camera.

                  The sensor collects 'raw' data and the firmware corrects the data to make it recogniseable to the human eye (JPEG).

                  Is it possible to play with the firmware and get raw data, as it might, reveal more things at different light frequencies?

                  Did you visit to have your 'black hole' fixed go well?

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                  • #10
                    Evan,

                    Can you enhance it so that only the gold, silver and precious gems (just diamonds, rubies & saphires are necessary) show up?

                    That way, I'll know where to aim my backyard built spacecraft (got a lot of work to do on it before it's even close to launch ready........not to mention finding a fuel source.......LOL).

                    Thanks...........Rodg
                    RPease

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by rancherbill
                      You were talking in another thread about changing the firmware in a camera.

                      The sensor collects 'raw' data and the firmware corrects the data to make it recogniseable to the human eye (JPEG).

                      Is it possible to play with the firmware and get raw data, as it might, reveal more things at different light frequencies?
                      Not really. Cannon, and several other manufacturers have had the raw (uncompressed) picture format for years -- the hacked firmware isn't doing anything that people haven't been doing on their desktops with Photoshop et al for as long.

                      The CMOS sensing element in consumer cameras is capable of sensing from deep blue to near infra-red. But they add an IR filter, so even that segment of the spectrum is unavailable unless you remove the filter.

                      If you're looking for the multi-spectral goggles that the Predator carries, you'll need a better sensor
                      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                      • #12
                        You can order a Canon SLR without the IR filter for astrophotography. Then you must use an external IR filter for regular photos which isn't much of a chore. Removing the IR filter increases the sensitivity of the array by about double.

                        Incidentally, the sensor in all Canon SLRs including the top end pro models is CMOS. They developed a proprietary method for making CMOS arrays with far less variation in pixel amplifier gain which is the main issue with most CMOS sensors. From what I understand they fab their own sensors. That is what accounts for the extremely good battery life on the Canon SLRs. The 300/350D cameras can take over 500 shots on a full charge.

                        the hacked firmware isn't doing anything that people haven't been doing on their desktops with Photoshop et al for as long.
                        Not quite. I have the hacked firmware from the Russian programmer installed on my 300D. It boosts the ISO to 3200 from 1600. Also the CHDK software, which isn't a firmware hack, will take advantage of capabilities in the Canon Powershot line that are normally locked out of a particular model.
                        Last edited by Evan; 03-09-2009, 05:38 PM.
                        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Evan
                          Incidentally, the sensor in all Canon SLRs including the top end pro models is CMOS. They developed a proprietary method for making CMOS arrays with far less variation in pixel amplifier gain which is the main issue with most CMOS sensors.
                          That's arguable. Canon went to CMOS sensors because they're a whole lot cheaper to produce. Nikon, as you know, only uses CCD elements on their high-end cameras.

                          I have the hacked firmware from the Russian programmer installed on my 300D. It boosts the ISO to 3200 from 1600.
                          Which is completely useless At ISO 1600, there' so much noise from the CMOS sensor that it's a joke. The only reason they have that setting in the stock firmware is because ISO ratings have become a silly consumer marketing point -- to put outrageously high ISO's on the cardboard box.

                          I'll try the firmware out tonight -- at least I'll get a video game
                          "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by lazlo
                            The CMOS sensing element in consumer cameras is capable of sensing from deep blue to near infra-red. But they add an IR filter, so even that segment of the spectrum is unavailable unless you remove the filter.
                            So I interpret this to mean that there is more data outside the visible spectrum that is being filtered out. This answers my question as to whether you can create a 'false' color picture and find even more riches on the moon.

                            We'll have to start a thread on homebuilt mining equipment - A Universal Metric CNC Radial Arm Indexable Shaft Boring Machine with DRO. Maybe the US guys can get some Stimulus Money to do the basic research as it relates to Global Warming. I think there's an idea somewhere in this.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by rancherbill
                              So I interpret this to mean that there is more data outside the visible spectrum that is being filtered out. This answers my question as to whether you can create a 'false' color picture and find even more riches on the moon.
                              Or night-time pictures reminiscent of Paris Hilton

                              On web cams it's easy to remove the IR filter. It looks hard to do on a point-and-shoot. Maybe Evan's done that?
                              "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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