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  • New guy with a problem

    I have a problem I hope some one can help with. I bought a lathe last
    Saturday.While it was being unload at my shop I slipped and fell on my back
    and could not help the guy unload it. The guy that delivered it was unloading
    it alone and tipped it over. My ? is how and what do I need to check on
    it now that it has crashed? It fell onto the back side,Lucky if you can call it that.
    I do not see any broken castings. It did hit part of the saddle.
    It was picked up by putting a chain thru the spindle and lifting with a engine
    crane, was this right or wrong?
    Any help would be appreciated.

    old blue

  • #2
    Welcome to the bb and sorry about your luck on all accounts......I would never recommend lifting it by the spindle/chuck, looks like you have to test all of it out now, check runout on the spindle, noise, run the carriage up and down the bed and lastly make a test cut on a piece of stock, was it used or any chance of it going back from shipping damage??

    Lifting by the bed using tongs or slings is usually a better idea or follow the manufacturers recommendations.....depends on how heavy and stout the machine is.....
    Opportunity knocks once, temptation leans on the doorbell.....

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    • #3
      The machine is heavy, it is all cast iron. When it was laying on its back
      that was the only way we could stand it back up.

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      • #4
        What kind of lathe is it? If it is a plain bearing machine, it should be fine. A roller bearing machine should be OK too, just turn the spindle slowly by hand to make sure that something does not feel "crunchy". I would be more worried if it was an asian machine with a ball bearing spindle. You might exceed the spindle bearing load rating and cause some problems. What does the spindle feel like now?

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        • #5
          Ouch!! definitely not the best way to lift it, but ... when your "back" is against the wall (or thrown out!) then you do what ya gotta do!

          Just go thru the motions as already mentioned ... think about how/where there may have been high stress on parts and carefully test/check them out. Youre right, since it had to fall, twas better on the back than front, you can rip the apron plum off on a fall.

          As mentioned if its got the cone type bearings, its probably (cross fingers) gonna be alright in the headstock, the apron/saddle will most probably be where any damage is--

          Good luck, -- and keep us advised.
          If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

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          • #6
            I live in Northern Oakland Co. where in MI are you I might be able to make time and take a look at for you, I unfortunately only know enough to get in to trouble, but a second set of eyes may help in checking it out.
            Mike
            Brandon MI
            2003 MINI Cooper S JCW#249
            1971 Opel GT
            1985 Ford 3910LP

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            • #7
              Originally posted by MickeyD
              What kind of lathe is it? If it is a plain bearing machine, it should be fine. A roller bearing machine should be OK too, just turn the spindle slowly by hand to make sure that something does not feel "crunchy". I would be more worried if it was an asian machine with a ball bearing spindle. You might exceed the spindle bearing load rating and cause some problems. What does the spindle feel like now?
              My luck only gets worse. It has a ball bearing spindle. It is 1979 KBC/Asian machine. The saddle moves freely. the spindle rolls ok no noises.
              The spindle has a 2" thru hole not the smaller 1 1/2" so the bearings
              are a little bigger. Is there a way to check the spindle bearings with out
              taking them out? Any issues I might have with the gearing in the head?

              Just to clarify, we didn't pick up the whole machine by the spindle. We just lifted it enough to stand it back up if that matters ?.
              Last edited by old blue; 03-09-2009, 11:17 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Mike of the North
                I live in Northern Oakland Co. where in MI are you I might be able to make time and take a look at for you, I unfortunately only know enough to get in to trouble, but a second set of eyes may help in checking it out.

                I live south of Grand Rapids.

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                • #9
                  old blue, does the lathe have any protection on the back side such as a chip shield or tray under the bed?

                  Do you have a digital camera? If so put a photo on PhotoBucket and the copy it to here so we can see the lathe.
                  It's only ink and paper

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Carld
                    old blue, does the lathe have any protection on the back side such as a chip shield or tray under the bed?

                    Do you have a digital camera? If so put a photo on PhotoBucket and the copy it to here so we can see the lathe.
                    No it does not. I will see if I can get some pic's.

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                    • #11
                      Welcome from me as well.

                      What kind of surface did it land on. Grassy? Chipped drive? Concrete or asphalt?

                      The first would be the least liable to do damage. Chipped drive, not good, but better than a really hard surface.

                      I'd not have put a chain through the spindle. May have dinged that a bit. Nylon strap would have been better. Even a bar with chain looped around both ends, wrapped around the bar to "choke" it so as not to slip off and drop it again.

                      Take the headstock out of gear and roll it by hand, or in gear and run it under power, if you can, and feel and listen for roughness.

                      I don't think you will have done any major damage to it, if you haven't actually broken anything, castings, I mean. Bearings are generally chaep enough to replace.

                      Still, you should tell us what the lathe is, and the size, though with a 2" spindle bore, it's probably large enough to make a pretty good "thunk" when it lands on its back.

                      I hope you haven't suffered too much, indeed, ANY damage, to your machine.

                      Cheers,

                      George

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                      • #12
                        Good chance you bent the spindle if you put a chain through it. Scott at Monarch told me thats the #1 cause of bent spindles.

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                        • #13
                          The machine is a KBC/San Yuen Grip1640.

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                          • #14
                            Here are some pic's.






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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by gmatov
                              Welcome from me as well.

                              What kind of surface did it land on. Grassy? Chipped drive? Concrete or asphalt?

                              The first would be the least liable to do damage. Chipped drive, not good, but better than a really hard surface.

                              I'd not have put a chain through the spindle. May have dinged that a bit. Nylon strap would have been better. Even a bar with chain looped around both ends, wrapped around the bar to "choke" it so as not to slip off and drop it again.

                              Take the headstock out of gear and roll it by hand, or in gear and run it under power, if you can, and feel and listen for roughness.

                              I don't think you will have done any major damage to it, if you haven't actually broken anything, castings, I mean. Bearings are generally chaep enough to replace.

                              Still, you should tell us what the lathe is, and the size, though with a 2" spindle bore, it's probably large enough to make a pretty good "thunk" when it lands on its back.

                              I hope you haven't suffered too much, indeed, ANY damage, to your machine.

                              Cheers,

                              George

                              Yes as luck (bad luck) would have it it was on cement.

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