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  • Machinist Cartoons

    I have to do a presentation at a High School, to enlighten students about the Machinist trade. I am looking for a couple of cartoons, and cool project photos to put in a Power Point. My audiece is 15 - 18 yrs. Any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks

    Pat

  • #2
    Search for "Bull of the Woods". I don't know what or how many strips might be found online, but it's an old comic based in a pre-WW2 (and some post-war) industrial machine shop. More focus on the characters' interactions than on the shop or machines themselves, but there's more than a few that deal with shop safety.

    Doc.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

    Comment


    • #3
      Those are sorta funny...

      Comment


      • #4
        Hum. Not as many as I'd thought... I know I've seen quite a few posted here and there, but Google Image isn't bringing 'em up...

        There's this and this, but there's several of the actual B&W cartoons out there somewhere.

        Doc.
        Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

        Comment


        • #5
          Bull of the Woods Cartoons

          The cartoons are available in a a two volume paper back issue. I wish I was related to the cartoonist but I do share his name.
          J.R. Williams

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          • #6
            pictures

            shuswap: Hi there, get hold of Lee Valley in Van. They have (had?) the Bull of the Woods vol. 1 and 2. I really enjoyed these and remember seeing these back in the 50's in some of the older newspapers, Wayne

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            • #7
              J R Williams also applied his insightful humor to cowboying out West and the inner city living. The machine rebuilding book has a few good ones also.

              Jim
              Jim

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              • #8
                Now, that takes me back.........

                When I was growing up, I read out our way first on the comics page. Too bad it has gone the way of the DoDo bird. Other favorites were PoGo, Andy Capp, and [?] our boarding house. Remember Major Hoople? So, JR Williams work needs to be saved for us old farts. Looks like I need to look around and find out what has been done, maybe I can find the volumes previously mentioned. One of my favorites shows a guy planing the bull of the wood's desk down with a big ole hand plane. Pile of shavings knee high. Classic comments about the outcome by the guys. Another shows the 3 kids, the 2 scrounges collecting pop bottles in gunnysacks, with their more dapper buddy using a briefcase for his.

                It's been a long time since the funny papers were funny, I think.

                TC

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Tim Clarke
                  It's been a long time since the funny papers were funny, I think.
                  TC
                  If you want funny comics, visit the web. That's where the innovation is happening. Some good panels from one of my favorites....

                  http://xkcd.com/220/
                  http://xkcd.com/325/
                  http://xkcd.com/457/

                  - Bart
                  Bart Smaalders
                  http://smaalders.net/barts

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Wow. I was on XKCD literally -right- before I came here.

                    One of my recent favorites...

                    http://xkcd.com/552/


                    although it's TOTALLY non machinist-related.

                    And to plug Doc, here's HIS web comic!!
                    http://the-whiteboard.com/
                    You never learn anything by doing it right.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thinking metric?

                      This one is funny and useful:

                      http://xkcd.com/526/
                      Cheers,
                      Gary

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Scatterplot
                        And to plug Doc, here's HIS web comic!
                        -Complete with several years of embarrasingly bad artwork... I suggest skipping the early stuff (which has a lot more of the paintball stuff anyway) and try starting here. Or truncate it even further and start here to get a good sample bite.

                        And yes, I know I'm no Bill Watterson. I do the strip for fun, not for a living.

                        Doc.
                        Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          You sell yourself short, Doc. I discovered The White Board by accident, now it's on my daily read list along with Questionable Content, Girl Genius, Wasted Talent, Just A Bit Off and OF COURSE XKCD.

                          I'm not into paintball, but I'm going to go so far as to say you are the Scott Adams of the small-shop. Replace paintball with "sheetmetal" or "turned parts" and you have the typical interactions that drive a small private shop... sans the over-the-top exploding boss incident.
                          This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
                          Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
                          Plastic Operators Dot Com

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                          • #14
                            This should tell them something.

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                            • #15
                              The only two shop comics I know of are Bull of the Woods (available by mail order through Lee Valley or in stores) and Muddle the engineer by Terry Sexton (regularly run in The Model Engineer). You could consider the Wordless Workshop by Roy Doty? that used to appear in one of the North American handyman mags (MI?). The wordless workshop is aimed at carpentry and handyman hints not metal working related..
                              Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

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