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OT- So, has anyone constructed their own fish pond?

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  • OT- So, has anyone constructed their own fish pond?

    The "Title" pretty much says it all.

    Why you created it.
    What size?
    Any fish, quanity and species?
    What type of equipment installed (air, bublers,fountains ect?
    What type of feed system (shiners,minnows,blue gill)(granulated)?
    What problems have you encountered along the way (construction, design)?

    I am perhaps 60% complete with one being constructed on my property.

    Seeing the post about "Victory Gardens" prompted this post.



    Patch

  • #2
    Not for eating fish, ours is "decorative".......

    The 'coons do get a meal off it every so often, at least they did with the Koi. Found the scales in a pile, but none of the fish. That 'coon came back another night, but the third night I waited up for him and beat the sh%% out of him.

    Now we just have domestic carp.... i.e. goldfish in there. Don't feed em anything, we're not breeding them. They grow to the size the food allows. There are always a few big ones, and the rest little. When a big one dies, a little one grows up.

    For a stock pond you need probably at least a 30 foot or bigger pond, and if you have a lot of fish, which you would for any sort of stocking program, you'll need to feed them and probably pump air or aerate the water by some sort of fountain. I understand the best size is around 30 by 50 or so.

    The city has stocking ponds that are bigger,. they aerate, but I don't think they feed. They aren't high density.

    Seeing Bill's post, I better add that we have had the pond since about 1996, and most of the goldfish are descendants of the first ones. The 'coon was the first year, and he got so much filth in the pond we had to pump it and re-fill. lost some fish too. But since that time, it's been OK.

    Barley straw keeps down algae.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 04-02-2009, 10:45 PM.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

    Comment


    • #3
      I built one, about 1500 gal ..... after 4 yrs I took the thing up and filled the hole in --- YES! Was not worth the hassle. Course my biggest problem was/is pine trees and the never ending supply of needles (and of course leaves) - and, I'm here in the south and algae was an ongoing battle also - I had about 2-3 months out of the year when it looked nice and maintenance was fairly low.

      I finally got a bit of a handle on the algae when I built a filter system about 20 times bigger than most of the literature said would handle. I used a 100 gallon stock watering tank from TSC, with lava rock & commercial A/C filter media. I also increased the pump size about 3 times over what was recommended.

      I had an assortment of fish and didnt have a lot of luck there either, a giant Koi and two 49cent goldfish from wallyworld lasted the longest - bout 3 years. Couldnt keep plants to live either--- Oh, you dont need to feed the fish, most folks dont (can add to the algae problem)

      So, as you can see, I wasnt very impressed with a "water feature"
      Last edited by Bill Pace; 04-02-2009, 10:41 PM.
      If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by J Tiers
        Barley straw keeps down algae.
        That's interesting and good to know.
        It was an important factor as part of this ponds design. In such, the depth of the pond, once the liner and bedding is in, should be near 4'-6". Most of what I have read and found on the net by hacheries and the Wildlife/Fish& game depts, this is a recommended depth to discourage algae.

        Not sure to say if it is a small or large pond but, it measures 110' long and is 30' wide at the upper end and 40' wide at its tail.
        Everyone knows the wowowo, ya know, 36"X24"X36". Well, this pond is in two main sections similiar to what a hornet would look like from a top view.
        The upper pond will feed into the lower pond and recycle continuelly in a supply mode to the upper pond.


        Originally posted by Bill Pace
        Course my biggest problem was/is pine trees and the never ending supply of needles (and of course leaves)
        Such is of similiar situation by design.
        Though because of the depths of this pond so far it hasn't created any concerns. (not yet at least)
        I found that actually pine needles and cones are good. Seems there is some type of acid or composit in them that helps inhibit weeds. Game & Fish suggested a small dam of pine branches and a few logs. Basicly to give the feeder fish a small haven.


        As far as a filter(screen), there isn't but a small one planned whose only purpose will be to filter large trash prior to a pair of jet pumps to feed the upper pond.


        So far its been a 2 year fun project. The heavy work is near complete.
        This spring and early summer I hope to have the plumbing and liner in followed by a little vegitation, 2 bridges and cabana.
        Next year it will get stocked.

        The heavy work, well it was. Most of the 80 plus rocks used weighed over 6 ton.


        And, I still have a smile over all.

        What do you guys think would make nice conversation additives?

        Comment


        • #5
          Another algae point is pond PH. About 7 is ideal.

          One type of algae lives in acid water (under 7), another in basic water (over 7). The sweet spot is about 7 on the nose. The fish like it also.

          Paradoxically, for smaller ponds and ornamental fish, some salt in the water helps. Seems to keep the fish healthier.

          For a pond 40 x 100 foot (I assume you didn't mean meters) you would need a barley straw bale or two. You gonna stock any northern or muskie in there?
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          Comment


          • #6
            Yes I made one around 7 foot square with a 1,200 gph pump. It ws just wasted space so I made the pond for about $150 two poly sheets and a tarp. its about 2 feet deep and has fish and snails, the dogs love to drink from it.







            I love it, my feeder gold fish have had babies every year.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by J Tiers


              For a pond 40 x 100 foot (I assume you didn't mean meters) you would need a barley straw bale or two. You gonna stock any northern or muskie in there?
              Not quite sure as yet.
              Game & Fish suggested I stay with species typical to this area which include,
              lg mouth bass, stripers, blue gill, catfish, and during the winter a small stock of trout.
              The sizing of the pond has the capacity to sustain about 250 fish not including about 800 feeder fish which will propigate.

              Though muskie was a consideration for cold climate.

              We get heavy freezes also so at this point , I'm not sure what the winter results will be on a static pond.
              Changes of which type of fish fair better than the others will be a time consideration based on all-round weather conditions.

              The basic stocking plan is about half the total capacity in case a change is needed. Also part of the reason for a 2 pond type setup as this was designed.

              OK, heres the where the machinist part comes in now.
              The air-rotator system will incorporate 2 verticle multi vaned wind mills.
              Something I have not had a chance to fabricate as yet.

              Comment


              • #8
                tatoomike68,


                That is a very nice pond. I give you much credit of design. I like seeing those which are not purchased such as the polyvinyl type typically sold in the big box stores.

                Your ground strata really looks good too. A foot of top soil and a nice sandy loam underlayment.

                My area has about 2 to 3 feet of clay over tan sandy/gravely loam. Some of the top clays that I removed will be replaced to help seal the bed before the liner goes in.

                Comment


                • #9
                  A rolling rotor type pump on a windmill will work just fine, Take a look at a blood pump used for kindney dialysis. real simple to make at any scale.

                  I would like to make a few small wind powered water pumps to water the grass where I like to go sail boating. We talked about that 10 years ago but still dont have one. more power to you if you make one. take pictures.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Patch
                    tatoomike68,


                    That is a very nice pond. I give you much credit of design. I like seeing those which are not purchased such as the polyvinyl type typically sold in the big box stores.

                    Your ground strata really looks good too. A foot of top soil and a nice sandy loam underlayment.

                    My area has about 2 to 3 feet of clay over tan sandy/gravely loam. Some of the top clays that I removed will be replaced to help seal the bed before the liner goes in.

                    Thanks, its all rock hard clay like Cillechi?(spelling) It dont suck water at all. its bad stuff, real tough digging. perfect for ponds.

                    I did two layers of poly, and a good old green tarp so the rocks dont cut the poly.

                    getting rocks was a good time, get some beer and go for a drive in the hills and grab rocks from the slide areas.

                    I love the fish pond so do my visitors its real natural looking other then the center peice. I want one way bigger but thats another project.

                    A blooming waterlillie

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by tattoomike68
                      A rolling rotor type pump on a windmill will work just fine, Take a look at a blood pump used for kindney dialysis. real simple to make at any scale.

                      I would like to make a few small wind powered water pumps to water the grass where I like to go sail boating. We talked about that 10 years ago but still dont have one. more power to you if you make one. take pictures.
                      Ah yes,
                      The type of windmills will basically resemble that of an attic turbine. The type that mount to rooftops.
                      My HVAC man said he would cut and piece them together. They are 3600cfm
                      in design, and what I would need to fabricate would be the drive system from it to the air pumps. They're a ball type vain and will set on tri-pods 30' above the ground.

                      The plan is, to use cogged timing belts to reduce fricton and lesson the tension loads of the pump/vain assemblies. I've seen a few of similiar design only they were of a straight vain configuration. Similiar to the squirell fan in evaporative coolers.

                      And believe it or not, last Xmas I did get a digital camera. The first one in
                      over 40 years.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Patch
                        Ah yes,
                        The type of windmills will basically resemble that of an attic turbine. The type that mount to rooftops.
                        My HVAC man said he would cut and piece them together. They are 3600cfm
                        in design, and what I would need to fabricate would be the drive system from it to the air pumps. They're a ball type vain and will set on tri-pods 30' above the ground.

                        The plan is, to use cogged timing belts to reduce fricton and lesson the tension loads of the pump/vain assemblies. I've seen a few of similiar design only they were of a straight vain configuration. Similiar to the squirell fan in evaporative coolers.

                        And believe it or not, last Xmas I did get a digital camera. The first one in
                        over 40 years.
                        Thats doable so you want to pump air down and not pump water up?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by tattoomike68
                          Thanks, its all rock hard clay like Cillechi?(spelling) It dont suck water at all. its bad stuff, real tough digging. perfect for ponds.

                          I did two layers of poly, and a good old green tarp so the rocks dont cut the poly.

                          getting rocks was a good time, get some beer and go for a drive in the hills and grab rocks from the slide areas.

                          I love the fish pond so do my visitors its real natural looking other then the center peice. I want one way bigger but thats another project.

                          A blooming waterlillie

                          Interesting thing about rocks. Always fun to get out.
                          Most of the rocks I was able to obtain came from the highway dept.
                          Major new road re-construction. They were free and so was delivery of 35 miles one way.
                          They needed a place to dump and I needed the rocks. I took in 62 end dumps of rocks. (I did say at that time, What did I get myself into)
                          Because of their size, they could only get about 4 or five in each trailer because of the weight. I also wound up with about 150 ton of shading/smaller rock which they had to use as a cushion for the large rock in each trailer.

                          Speaking of a brew and a good time. When I first decided to start this project I went to our local high school and spoke to the dean of ag. dept.
                          As a future project for one of their classes, when the time comes to vegitate the pond, the class will have a field day of planting.
                          This will include reeds, cana, seagreen junipers and low profile ferns.
                          I promised a big wienie roast for the kids. I'm looking forward to that being a very fun day.

                          Oh, you know the old saying don't ya?

                          Referring to you wanting a larger pond some day.

                          If a little bit is good then a lot must be fantastic.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by tattoomike68
                            Thats doable so you want to pump air down and not pump water up?
                            Exactly right.

                            The jet pumps are for circulating the water. One will be used for a large rain ball the other will be used in conjunction of circulating water and distribut water irrigation to the fruit orchard.

                            The vained turbins will be only for air-rators. The pumps will be direct drive without any clutchs. There will be 2 pex-poly lines with limiting air valves(for balance) leading to perforated airline underwater and directed to several areas.

                            Have you done such a thing as this?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thought you may want to see what the turbine windmill basiclly looked like.
                              Tho this one is much a larger scale to help generate electricity the ones I will be making will be smaller scale and also have a half ball cap on top.

                              Here is a link showing its basic configuration.

                              http://www.engadget.com/2007/11/26/m...rmal-windmill/

                              They create an amazing amount of torque given the implied loads.

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