Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

SketchUp meets POV-Ray, happy couple

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • SketchUp meets POV-Ray, happy couple

    Google SketchUp now has a plugin available for free that makes it into a front end for the most powerful ray tracer around, POV-Ray. POV-Ray is freeware and has been around since the Amiga. It is under continuous development and is the most accurate ray tracing program available. It is also freeware. It can model nearly all aspects of light and how it interacts with matter correctly using complex alorithms that simulate natural processes.

    The big drawback of POV-Ray has always been that it has no graphical user interface. It still doesn't and is programmed in a stand alone fully fledged programming language a lot like C but strictly oriented to the production of realistic images. The language is called SDL, Scene Description Language. It is very difficult to write a compiler for it as it has thousands of possible options, many of which interact in different ways depending on order of execution.

    There have been some attempts in the past, notably Moray but since it wasn't freeware the POV-Ray team didn't officially support it.

    This new effort works fairly well although the option set is pretty limited. Still, the quality of rendering is miles ahead of what Google supplies in SketchUp.

    Here are a couple of examples. I didn't create the machine models although I did tune them up and and made some new textures to increase realism. The rest of the scenes, including the new shop I created with SketchUp.





    Links:

    POV-Ray: http://povray.org

    SketchUp plugin: http://www.crai.archi.fr/RubyLibrary...by/su2pov.html

    The plugin is available for PC and MAC as is POV-Ray
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

  • #2
    3d

    Evan,

    Good to see someone remembered the calendar.

    Pardon the dumb question, but what is the advantage of having accurate shadows in a scene ?

    Lenord

    Comment


    • #3
      It impresses the clients.
      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

      Comment


      • #4
        Great stuff. Mill looks a little underpowered, though. What is that, a 1/6th HP surplus sewing machine motor?

        The gear-drive leadscrew handles are kind of cool, though...

        Doc.
        Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

        Comment


        • #5
          Evan,

          This is impressive work, for a PC-based application. The lighting you have shown is direct, with strong shadows -- chiaroscuro lighting I think it's called in painting. Can the software also model diffuse reflections for a softer look?
          Allan Ostling

          Phoenix, Arizona

          Comment


          • #6
            Pov-ray has always been utterly astonishing. The artists that are very good at it produce amazing things:

            http://images.google.com/images?hl=e...gbv=2&aq=f&oq=

            http://hof.povray.org/
            Last edited by dp; 04-06-2009, 01:53 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              The lighting you have shown is direct, with strong shadows -- chiaroscuro lighting I think it's called in painting. Can the software also model diffuse reflections for a softer look?
              POV-Ray can model virtually anything with any effects including impossible situations. SketchUp however is extremely limited re lighting. The only "true" light source available is the sun in SketchUp. This means that if you use SketchUp as the only source of input to POV-Ray you will be limited to what SketchUp can do. It isn't difficult to add your own features to whatever Sketchup produces but that takes you into the realm of direct programming without an interface to assist. That is a step too far for many people even though it isn't very difficult.

              For instance, to add a light source using the text editor in POV-Ray you need only add this code fragment:

              Code:
              light_source { <X,Y,Z>, Color White }
              There are many possible modifiers that can be used for different effects. POV-Ray also stands out because of the absolutely first class documentation in the help files. Every possibile permutation is explained and for every command there is a tutorial section with code fragments that you may cut and paste into the editor to produce the effect in question.

              It also has an enormous array of third party tools, modfications and recompilations, as well as extensive libraries of objects, models and effects, all of them free.

              Here is a stereo "triplet" that can be viewed either with crossed eye technique using the left pair or uncrossed fused with the right pair.

              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

              Comment


              • #8
                Evan you are one step away from creating your very own virtual machine shop video game, hell, Id give the lathe handles a spin, That looks really cool.

                Now I wish I was wealthy, that first pic with the sky lights in a machine shop -- I want that shop!
                Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 04-06-2009, 07:04 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  A 3d machine simulator would be neat. If it were as good as the airplanes they are able to create for use in Microsoft flight I don't see why you could not only run them manually, but also use it to test cnc programing.

                  Don't know if I'm changing the subject, but the effects they have created in their flight sim look just like that, light, shadows, reflections, only they move. One old plane they have has exposed rocker arms that if you zoom in on them look very real as they move faster as you increase the throttle.
                  Gene

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Don't know if I'm changing the subject, but the effects they have created in their flight sim look just like that, light, shadows, reflections, only they move. One old plane they have has exposed rocker arms that if you zoom in on them look very real as they move faster as you increase the throttle.
                    Not a change. Ray tracing is often used to create photorealistic scenes in games. However, the scenes or the items in the scene are precomputed and played back. There are also shortcuts that can be used in programming to produce effects that are a lot like ray tracing but only in limited circumstances.

                    Ray tracing is the most computer calculation intensive application there is. It works by back following the path that light would take as it is focused by a lens on the pixels of a camera. The path is followed to find out what it encountered on the way to the lens and how that affected the photons in terms of intensity and color. If the photons take a path that has many reflections and refractions without diminishing them in intensity much the number of calculations to be done for just one pixel can easily be in the tens of thousands since it is checked a tiny step at a time along the path.

                    The holy grail of computer gaming and computer graphics in general is to have sufficient power to ray trace complete complex scenes at a live action frame rate. This still is well beyond the reach of any ordinary computer but it won't be for long.
                    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Can you move the stop start buttons up a bit on the lathe - I have a bad back

                      .
                      .

                      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Evan,

                        Thanks for the posting. I ran a BBS for many years called PCGnet (Professional CAD and Graphics network) and ADEnet. Man that's something I haven't typed since the early 90's or late 80's. That was way back in the 1200/2400 baud dialup days, even less. I didn't have a clue that POV was still around, very interesting. As was mentioned, it was very difficult to use but then again that was back in the DOS days. Anyway a very impressive program. Looks like I will have to check it out.

                        I went onto a raytracing program called Accurender, then Rhino with its raytracing/radiosity abilities then Brazil. Anyway, you may find this link interesting ... maybe not either

                        http://brazil.mcneel.com/

                        http://www.photonengr.com/fred/calculations.html

                        Oh, and as you know, stuff like this took HOURS to process in those days. Probably why you were asking about processors in another posting. <smile>

                        http://www.pbase.com/smokedaddy/image/111006965

                        Regards,
                        -SD:
                        Last edited by Smokedaddy; 04-06-2009, 11:56 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          How hard would it be to create a click mode so I can view your original picture and then click on the calender to get a close up? Thats the start of the old "MYST" games that led to "riven" and then myst exile. They were fun puzzle solving games for PS2 and the likes.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by aostling
                            This is impressive work, for a PC-based application.
                            LOL! POV-Ray is an open-source ray tracer. It runs on Windows, Linux, MacOS, ...

                            This is just a random model done with the same program:

                            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Evan
                              The holy grail of computer gaming and computer graphics in general is to have sufficient power to ray trace complete complex scenes at a live action frame rate. This still is well beyond the reach of any ordinary computer but it won't be for long.
                              You know who hired me away from Intel, right?

                              Nvidia has been demonstrating an interactive real-time ray tracer called, cleverly, IRT:

                              NVIDIA Demonstrates Real-time Interactive Ray-tracing



                              Like Bart alluded on the other thread, it's a CUDA app that runs entirely on the GPU, so it's not dependent on CPU performance. It's not open-source, but I'm looking for a video of it...
                              Last edited by lazlo; 04-06-2009, 12:15 PM.
                              "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X