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  • Metal Shears

    I am thinking about buying a metal shear from Grizzly. It's on page 440 of their catalog and it's specs are on this web page:

    http://www.grizzly.com/products/item...emnumber=H0732

    I do a lot of copper and other metals in sheet form and need some way to cut it, and not go broke. Plus heavier things I have a bandsaw and a abrasive saw.

    Any thoughts or ideas?

    Thanks,

    Jerry

  • #2
    Jerry,yes they are good to have around,we have a set of throatless shears at work and I have a 12"set of Pexto throatless at home,very handy,much easier to control than nibblers and the like,one piece of advice,get the biggest you can,don't they make an 8"?
    I just need one more tool,just one!

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    • #3
      WS,
      There make a 12" set for a few dollar more than the 6 inch set. I still would use my nibblers for non-straight cutting, mainy artistis stuff, because thats what I do.

      Thanks,

      Jerry

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      • #4
        Jerry

        Thin Copper you can cut with scissors or a paper shear. One word of caution - if you shear lots of heavy material (plate) as the cutting edge dulls it becomes more difficult to shear cleanly lighter material.

        ...and keep your fingers out of the blades!

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        • #5
          If you are doing art type work with angles and curves look at Beverly throatless shears. They have several other types of shears also. I have the throatless and one that cuts slot internally in a sheet. Used it when I made instrumant panels. They cost more that what you are quoted from Grizzly. All of my sheet metal equipment is American made, the quality is much better.

          Joe

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          • #6
            I bought a cheaper version from Grizzly, and it cuts fine, but leaves a serrated edge to the workpiece. This may be a common effect of this type of tool, but i can only use it for rough cutting since i need a clean edge.
            Richard in Los Angeles

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            • #7
              RPM,
              I just need the rough cuts to be done, I would have other tools for fine cutting, but I buy copper and Brass in 4 x 8 sheet. Using the fine cutting tools on sheets these large is next to impossible.
              The Beverlys are much nicer, but you pay the price for them. I would like a 48 or 52 inch clean cut shear, but I don't have the $800 or so for something of that nature

              Jerry

              Jerry

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              • #8
                There is no substitute for a 48" treadle operated sheet metal shear. Aside from expense, the other downside is the space required. You need ten feet in front and five behind, at least, as well as plenty of manoeuvering room beside it. It is best to have a 4'x8' table aligned in front of the shear, good for markup and support. Also, for many shearing jobs it really takes two people to make a good job of a 4'x8' sheet.

                Also, watch where your fingers are!
                Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                • #9
                  If you are dealing with 4' x 8' sheet there is no substitute for a 52" stomp shear. New Pexto shear cost about $2500. They will last a long time and will save you lots of time and headaches. Used one can be had for about $1000 to $1200 in good shape with the gages and front supports. As stated they are heavy and do take up a lot of room.

                  The next best thing for cutting large sheets is a pneumatic hand shear. They have their problems but will cut the Sheet.

                  Joe

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                  • #10
                    Evan:
                    No, there is not substitute for a good Hydraulic shear. Foot shears are for tinbashers and other less "serious" uses. I can also tell you I never needed an assistant (except Mr. Overhead Crane....) to shear real metal - real shears have a squaring bar and a forrest of rollerballs to support the sheets. Anyone stupid enough to be on the backside of a shear when doing heavier material deserves to be injured. I have sheared millions of pounds of Steel, Stainless, and Aluminum and have the notched hearing to prove it.

                    [This message has been edited by Thrud (edited 08-26-2003).]

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