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OT: Successful amateur EVE space radio bounce

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  • OT: Successful amateur EVE space radio bounce

    Way OT, but along the lines of the guy with the hand-made triodes, which was very popular here:

    http://blog.makezine.com/archive/200...C-0D6B48984890

    A group of German amateur radio hobbyists has successfully bounced a radio signal off the planet Venus, over 31 million miles (50 million km) away, and received it back on Earth (Earth-Venus-Earth = EVE). Peter Guelzow (DB2OS), President of AMSAT-DL, writes:





    On March 25th, 2009, a team from the German space organisation AMSAT-DL reached another milestone on its way to its own interplanetary probe towards planet Mars.

    The ground station at the Bochum observatory transmitted radio signals to Venus. After traveling almost 100 million kilometers, and a round trip delay of about 5 minutes, they were clearly received as echoes from the surface of Venus.

    Receiving these planetary echoes is a first for Germany and Europe. In addition, this is the farthest distance crossed by radio amateurs, over 100 times further than echoes from the moon (EME reflections).

    For receiving the EVE signals, an FFT analysis with an integration time of 5 minutes was used. After integrating for 2 minutes only, the reflected signals were clearly visible in the display. Despite the bad weather, signals from Venus could be detected from 1038UT until the planet reached the local horizon.

    The 2.4 GHz high power amplifier used for this achievement is described in the current AMSAT-DL journal.
    This represented a crucial test for a final key component of the planned P5-A Mars mission. By receiving echoes from Venus, the ground and command station for the Mars probe has been cleared for operational use and the AMSAT team is now gearing up for building the P5-A space probe.

    For financing the actual construction and launch, AMSAT-DL is currently
    in negotiation with the DLR (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt) amongst others, to obtain financial support for the remaining budget of 20 Mil Euros.

    AMSAT-DL wants to show that low-cost interplanetary exploration is possible with its approach.
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

  • #2
    That's pretty cool. I wonder how much power they were using. I was doing EVE bounces with radar equipment in the 1970's (Mars and the moon, too), but I had 100kw to work with and I was definitely not strapped with amateur radio limitations as I was commercial radio licensed at the time. Painting the moon as it rose over the horizon was a regular event when circumstances allowed.

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    • #3
      I still get a kick of SuitSatI when they stuffed an HT in a space suit and pitched it overboard from a shuttle.
      N9HUI
      BudB

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      • #4
        Originally posted by BudB
        I still get a kick of SuitSatI when they stuffed an HT in a space suit and pitched it overboard from a shuttle.
        That's cool! I hadn't heard about "SuitSat" -- had to look it up:

        http://www.eham.net/articles/13110

        SuitSat-1 consists of a discarded Russian Orlan spacesuit reconfigured to function as a free-floating Amateur Radio transmit-only satellite. Activated at 2259 UTC, the satellite was programmed to come to life some 16 minutes later on 145.99 MHz. The 16-minute delay is said to be a crew safety measure. SuitSat-1's deployment over the south-central Pacific Ocean was the first task of the space walk.

        "Dosvidanya! Good-bye, Mr Smith!" Tokarev said in Russian as SuitSat, unhooked from its tether and pushed away from the space station, tumbled slowly away into the void. "It's moving at the specified acceleration." A project of the Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) program http://www.rac.ca/ariss, SuitSat drifted off until it appeared as a mere speck silhouetted against brightly illuminated Earth below.
        "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by lazlo
          That's cool! I hadn't heard about "SuitSat" -- had to look it up:

          http://www.eham.net/articles/13110

          SuitSat-1 consists of a discarded Russian Orlan spacesuit reconfigured to function as a free-floating Amateur Radio transmit-only satellite. Activated at 2259 UTC, the satellite was programmed to come to life some 16 minutes later on 145.99 MHz. The 16-minute delay is said to be a crew safety measure. SuitSat-1's deployment over the south-central Pacific Ocean was the first task of the space walk.

          "Dosvidanya! Good-bye, Mr Smith!" Tokarev said in Russian as SuitSat, unhooked from its tether and pushed away from the space station, tumbled slowly away into the void. "It's moving at the specified acceleration." A project of the Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) program http://www.rac.ca/ariss, SuitSat drifted off until it appeared as a mere speck silhouetted against brightly illuminated Earth below.
          More space junk!

          Paul

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          • #6
            More space junk!
            Not for long. Something like a suit has a high ratio of surface area to mass. It's orbit will decay quickly. The space station itself is only good for a couple of years if it isn't reboosted.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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