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Looking for ideas about vise stands...

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  • Your Old Dog
    replied
    found what I was looking for. Bolt one of these to the bottom of your workbench. (I'd scrap their u-bolts and counter sink bolt heads from the top of course)



    And then buy one of these from Harbor Freight if you don't have a welder.

    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=66260

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  • murph64
    replied
    Originally posted by Duffy
    Nobody has mentioned mounting the vise to a Wheel rim WITH TIRE. I used a length of 11" diameter beech log. Lag screws up through the lug holes and other lag screws to anchor the vise. It is sorta portable and doesnt move inuse.
    The problem with this, is the tire sticks out, and makes it a pain (literally ) to get close to the vise, or grinder in my case...




    Andy

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  • BadDog
    replied
    Originally posted by Your Old Dog
    I don't think anyone has yet mentioned the 2" receiver hitch bolted to the bottom of your heavy duty work bench. The 2" receiver shortie is available at camper stores. Guys use them to bolt a receiver hitch onto the back of their campers 4x4" back bumper. You would then mount your vice on a plate attached to the male hitch assembly. No reason you couldn't mount a small grinder that way and several other tools as well.
    Actually I did, but I'll add that it's much MUCH cheaper to get the stock direct from steel supply. They sell it in up to 20' lengths, I usually get 10' at a time, and usually use around 6 to 8" per mount. I've got grinders, mini-fab tables, welding fixtures, vises, "multi-mounts", a bead roller, a press brake, true tube bender, strap/bar bender, and I'm sure other things that mount in these receivers.

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  • Duffy
    replied
    Nobody has mentioned mounting the vise to a Wheel rim WITH TIRE. I used a length of 11" diameter beech log. Lag screws up through the lug holes and other lag screws to anchor the vise. It is sorta portable and doesnt move inuse.

    Leave a comment:


  • Your Old Dog
    replied
    I don't think anyone has yet mentioned the 2" receiver hitch bolted to the bottom of your heavy duty work bench. The 2" receiver shortie is available at camper stores. Guys use them to bolt a receiver hitch onto the back of their campers 4x4" back bumper. You would then mount your vice on a plate attached to the male hitch assembly. No reason you couldn't mount a small grinder that way and several other tools as well.

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  • TECHSHOP
    replied
    My largest vise mounted to a bench with a leg to the floor centered below it (any pounding is transfered to the ground, not the bench top). When a vise is mounted on a bench, place it so that the rear (fixed) jaw is clear of the bench top, otherwise you will limit yourself to short lengths of material.

    A medium size vice mounted to a stand made from type of brake drum seen in the picture (also have bench grinders on brake drums).

    I have several smaller vices (~10-20 lbs) that are mounted on wood or steel plates that I can move around. Those vices can be used on the truck trailer hitch, clamped to a heavy saw horse, a B&D "Workmate", or clamped in a larger vice (woodworking or metal working).

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    The best vice I have used was bolted to the corner of a 3 foot by 4 foot peice of 1.5' plate. 4 in pipe legs bolted to a tough floor big time.

    That way when you have a 1" drive socket and an 8 foot cheater pipe with two large men jumping on it trying to break loose a tough threaded part its not going anywhere.

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  • bruto
    replied
    I agonized over this for some time. At one time I had a huge Prentiss vise bolted to a stair landing in my shop but when I moved, I never found a good place. It sat for about 20 years, and then I finally found the material for a base. Excuse the messy shop in the picture. I actually have cleaned up that area a little since then, but not much. The base is the stump jumper from a very large bush hog, which happily came my way one day, the pedestal is a piece of very large pipe, and the mounting at top is heavy steel. The complex top is necessitated because the pivoting base of the vise uses a center bolt only. This base is heavy enough to withstand just about any use, but when tipped it can be moved by rolling in arcs. [IMG][/IMG]

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  • BadDog
    replied
    As I've said many times before, my vises and many other tools are mounted on 2" square tube. And I have 2.5" square tube "receiver hitch tube" (swagged out weld) welded/secured all over the place to form readily reconfigurable mounts. My fab table has several, a few more on the grinder table, there is a free standing mount secured to my concrete floor in an open area, and I have adapters to convert horizontal/vertical for use of random vehicle (or trailer) mounted receivers.

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  • sbmathias
    replied
    I've used an old plowing disc as a base. Fairly wide stance, almost zero tripping hazard, and free if you can scrounge a worn one somewhere. Bore a hole in the center big enough for the pipe you want to use, then weld the pipe in so it sits vertical. Flip it over and fill the cavity with lead, concrete, or whatever. It helps to tack in some old bolts or something so the filler has something to grab.

    The one downside is that it has a sharp edge that may wreak havoc on you shop floor if you roll it around much.

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  • cuemaker
    replied
    J Tiers...

    You could bolt the vise stand to the floor when you need it to be rock solid in a convient out of the way spot...I would think 2 small wedge anchors would do the job. Weld tabs to the drum...

    I dont know how heavy the drum is, but I would say considerdably more than my 50lb vise.. add in a steel pipe, steel plate to mount the vise to and maybe a steel plate on the drum so you can weld the pipe to it and I bet the weight of the stand will get well over 100lbs, maybe 150lbs depending on size of plate and pipe...add in the vise and your approaching 200 pounds..

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  • Chester
    replied
    Here is my vise mounting solution:

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  • Alistair Hosie
    replied
    Hi whatever you decide the vice is a beauty well done.kindest regards Alistair

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  • murph64
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers
    bolting to the floor isn't practical. I'd need to move it sometime.
    What about a threaded insert or two in the floor, and use some allthread to hold the drum down when you need it solidly mounted?



    Andy

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    The stand issue has been a problem here too. I have a fairly large Reed vise (20" or so long), and haven't been able to use it because I don't have a stand...

    Seems like the stand should weigh more than the vise... quite a bit more if it's on a pipe, since the work weighs something too, and sawing applies forces sideways.

    I don't think the brake drum stand will cut it for this, and I don't want the vise taking up that much of the workbench. it's a problem I haven't solved yet, because bolting to the floor isn't practical. I'd need to move it sometime.

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