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Now that I got them, what else do I need?

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  • Now that I got them, what else do I need?

    I saw a quantity of thirty brand new ceramic insert cutters, at a price of a quarter each, so I couldn't pass them up. They are triangular in shape and gold in color and made by the U.S. Tool Inc. The numbers of the back of the package are TL#9-ZC-6573 for the first line. The second line on the package is UST#1232-003 GR.C7 PVD TIN and the last line is WO#48368-1 11/02.

    From my take on the numbering information, they are tin coated, made in November of 2002 for a work order of 48368-1.

    Now that I got them, what are the used to cut, what size and type holder do I need to mount them? Appreciate any help. Thanks.
    Bill

    Being ROAD KILL on the Information Super Highway and Electronically Challenged really SUCKS!!

    Every problem can be solved through the proper application of explosives, duct tape, teflon, WD-40, or any combo of the aforementioned items.

  • #2
    Doesn't anyone have any idea of what these cutters are used for?
    Bill

    Being ROAD KILL on the Information Super Highway and Electronically Challenged really SUCKS!!

    Every problem can be solved through the proper application of explosives, duct tape, teflon, WD-40, or any combo of the aforementioned items.

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    • #3
      Bill,
      I am not conversant in ceramic. But when I got a bunch (about 100) inserts once with a bunch of stuff that a friend gave me, I built a couple of holders and tried them on the lathe and milling machine on different metals and found them quite useful. I guess I would experiment and figure it out. Good luck and at least they were cheep.

      Jay
      "Just build it and be done"

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      • #4
        Far machining Harden steel.
        Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
        http://sites.google.com/site/machinistsite/TWO-BUDDIES
        http://s178.photobucket.com/user/lan...?sort=3&page=1

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        • #5
          There you go Bill, your on your way. Jay
          "Just build it and be done"

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          • #6
            Originally posted by BigBoy1
            I saw a quantity of thirty brand new ceramic insert cutters, at a price of a quarter each, so I couldn't pass them up. They are triangular in shape and gold in color and made by the U.S. Tool Inc. The numbers of the back of the package are TL#9-ZC-6573 for the first line. The second line on the package is UST#1232-003 GR.C7 PVD TIN and the last line is WO#48368-1 11/02.

            From my take on the numbering information, they are tin coated, made in November of 2002 for a work order of 48368-1.

            Now that I got them, what are the used to cut, what size and type holder do I need to mount them? Appreciate any help. Thanks.
            Actually they are TiN coated, titanium nitride. Very durable little inserts and will do a great job on harder materials. Just don't baby them, run them fast and with good depth of cut. If you run too slow or try to take just a few thou with them you won't get the best finish. Also try to avoid interrupted cuts, HSS steel is a better option for things like shafts with keyways in them. Inserts are more prone to chipping on such jobs.

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            • #7
              You may have better luck if you give some more useful info like a brand. For that matter, if you know a brand, a company web site may be able to help.

              The trouble is that a lot of inserts use a proprietary numbering scheme and what you gave is not a standard descriptor (TPG 322 for example is a common insert shape, architecture and size). This may either be because the insert is truly unique in some way or is genuinely proprietary, or it may be a standard insert and the vendor only puts thier unique part number on it--which I find very aggrivating in sorting through surplus stuff and don't have gauge pins in hand to see if they are an SAE IC or are metric in size. If it ends up being a standard insert with a vendor-specific catalog number on the container, you would still need to give folks here some dimensional information (inscribed circle is the way most triangular inserts are measured) and perhaps a picture or two so they can say-- "Oh yeah, those would appear to be a TPG322 and holders are readily available". You did not mention whether they are positive or negative rake, as a starter.

              As already mentioned, even if you find they are unique in some way, you may be able to make a toolholder that suits your needs. I do tend to wonder if perhaps a ceramic insert holder will need to have good support out to the tip...more than a carbide insert might require. Both are brittle, but ceramic moreso.

              Paul
              Paul Carpenter
              Mapleton, IL

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