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How do I replicate one of these?

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  • How do I replicate one of these?

    I need to make a few unique scales similar to the one shown below. Meaning the lines and number representing the fractional measurements will be quite different in spacing. It does't need to be made of stainless, metal. I suppose it could even be made of some sort of plastic. Is there an etching process I can use if it were metal ... or something else.

    http://www.pbase.com/smokedaddy/image/111695232

    I have a manual Bridgeport, EMCO Maximat V10, a CNC Taig Mill (but I don't know how to use it) <red-faced>. Any suggestions or help for making them myself would be apprecaited.

    Regards,
    -SD:

  • #2
    Try this? http://www.emeralda.com/pp/ppserv/demos/lblpe_ac.pdf

    Metal etching with an image from a laser printer.

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    • #3
      Tell me what you need exactly.
      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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      • #4
        Evan has tone! Fox1! Fox2!

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        • #5
          Evan,

          I have developed "my own type of scale" similar to an architectural or engineering scale, except the graduations will be different and the nomenclature. It can't be a particle generator (to a certain degree) as it will be used in a clean room environment, so metal or plastic would be best. So I need a way to put sharp lines on the scale to represent the graduations, clear numbers, some text and maybe a simple logo. The actual size must be similar to the ruler I posted.

          -SD:

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          • #6
            I will make you some. Any material you like, within reason, since I am fresh out of aluminum oxynitride at the moment. Would you happen to have a nice little chunk of copper plate to trade around several inches square and at least 3/16" thick? Bussbar copper would be best...

            I forgot to mention, you supply the CAD in DXF format, otherwise the piece of copper must be somewhat larger...

            [added]

            For cleanroom use I would suggest a type of engraving that you can't easily get done. I use a carbide tip rounded with about the radius of about that of a ball point pen ball. Instead of cutting the surface of the material it only deforms it using a drag technique with no spindle motor on. This results in a surface entirely free of burrs. I can also offer chemical milling of copper, brass, stainless steel, or bronze. Minimum feature width is about .005" depending on how deep you need the features.
            Last edited by Evan; 04-24-2009, 02:41 PM.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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            • #7
              Hey Evan,

              What a super offer, it's appreciated too. Nope, I have no copper. <smile> To be honest, I really wanted to do it myself. I just didn't know how to go about accomplishing the task based on my abilities at the moment. There is nothing sophisticated about the scale, just a few lines on it with numbers and some text perhaps on the back. It is not an invention or anything, just a layout tool used for something specific that I would like to give to my students (after I thoroughly test it).

              -SD:

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              • #8
                I'd get a piece of stainless and use a scribe in the mill to mark the lines in the same manner as indicators are made on the lathe. There was a thread about it not too long ago.

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                • #9
                  Smokedaddy, this is an excuse to buy a laser engraver. That would make short work out of this project and many more in the future.

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                  • #10
                    MickeyC,

                    Do YOU personally know anything about them, for a homeshop type application? Brand, cost, requirements etc.?

                    -SD:

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                    • #11
                      Laser engravers don't work too well on reflective surfaces. For best results they should be used with materials specifically intended for such application such as dark anodized aluminum stock or other similar engraving stock.

                      For this application matte finish Stainless Steel is probably the most appropriate.
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Evan
                        Would you happen to have a nice little chunk of copper plate to trade around several inches square and at least 3/16" thick? Bussbar copper would be best...

                        .
                        Evan ,how big of a piece is "several inches square" ?
                        I have some copper and may need a favor some day.


                        Steve

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                        • #13
                          I want to make a heat sink from copper for my new Athlon 5750 X2 CPU. It can suck up to 95 watts at full tilt and copper is nearly twice as good a thermal conductor as aluminum. I could make it from silver but that is a bit more expensive and my stock of silver is meant for jewlery.

                          Ideally, I need a piece about 2" x 2" x 1/2" or 3/8ths thick. I want to make my own heatsink because my application is even more demanding than the most demanding games. It pushes both cores at 100 percent for hours with no breaks if the cooling system can keep up. I'll probably make a heat pipe system using methylene chloride as the heat transfer medium.
                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                          • #14
                            Laser Engraver

                            Laser engravers work very well with Acrylic. When I was teaching I used the Laser engraver with the students to make their own protractors and scales. By mirroring the lettering it was on the bottom/paper side of the tool which eliminated the parallax caused by the 1/8 inch thick plastic. The Acrylic called "green edge" worked better than the clear. The "dayglo green" and dayglo red" worked very well also. That being said, you need access to and engraving laser.

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                            • #15
                              Smoke,

                              Don't know if you are still considering the laser thing, but if you are, consider the accuracy of that method vs what you need in your scale. Laser printers use traveling sensors that are synchronized with the paper travel below. The accuracy of the scale you make will depend on that combination of motions. Plus a variety of other errors produced by the heating of paper and metal (different coefficents of expansion I am sure) when you transfer the image and other factors.

                              I have made a variety of scales for different purposes using printers and have experienced errors that can be as high as one or two percent of the full scale value. This could be unacceptable for some uses.

                              This does not mean that photo/printer methods are not good. Just that you need to know what your photo/printer equipment is capable of doing.
                              Paul A.

                              Make it fit.
                              You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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