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Yipee! I Get to Work in a Foundry!

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  • Yipee! I Get to Work in a Foundry!

    After years of trying to get a job in machining (but not being able to because I didn't have any experience), I've finally managed to score a job in a foundry that could lead to me working in a machine shop.

    I got it thanks to a buddy of mine who's working in their machine shop. They had four people walk out of the foundry in one week and are backlogged on orders. He called me, and I went down, had a five minute interview, and found out today that I get to start on Monday. It means a cut in pay (I'm going to have to get a second job to help make ends meet.), but at least I've gotten my foot in the door.

    Anything I should know, other than it'll be really hot?

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  • #2
    Keep your pant legs outside the boots.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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    • #3
      Don't wear boots with laces.
      I just need one more tool,just one!

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      • #4
        There are several things in a foundry that can cause health problems. Metal fumes, dust, noise, and the hot stuff come to mind right off. If the company is really a good place to work, they will have some strict safety rules, and training to make it clear why they're important.

        If the company provides safety equipment for you, make sure it's the best and most comfortable available. If it's not, inquire about buying better stuff at your own expense.

        I'd also be curious why several guys quit all at once. Maybe that's a sign of something going on that you don't want to get into.

        I have to admire someone who will give up a better paying job for one with an opportunity to lead to what he really wants to do. That takes guts in today's world.

        Good luck, and I hope the move really pays off for you.

        Roger
        Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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        • #5
          There are several things in a foundry that can cause health problems. Metal fumes, dust, noise, and the hot stuff come to mind right off. If the company is really a good place to work, they will have some strict safety rules, and training to make it clear why they're important.

          If the company provides safety equipment for you, make sure it's the best and most comfortable available. If it's not, inquire about buying better stuff at your own expense.

          I'd also be curious why several guys quit all at once. Maybe that's a sign of something going on that you don't want to get into.

          I have to admire someone who will give up a better paying job for one with an opportunity to lead to what he really wants to do. That takes guts in today's world.

          Good luck, and I hope the move really pays off for you.

          Roger
          Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

          Comment


          • #6
            winchman, apparently it's a pattern they have there. Folks work for the place for years, and then suddenly walk out in the middle of their shift. I trust my friend on this, besides, it's the only chance I've had in the years that I've been trying to get a job as a machinist, so I can't afford to turn it down.

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            • #7
              Tucker, one a-hole drops sparks on the floor, you get one more burn, you quit. That final straw.

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              • #8
                Tuckerfan:
                Best of luck with the new job - be safe!

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                • #9
                  Goodlettsville?

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                  • #10
                    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Al Messer:
                    Goodlettsville?</font>
                    Gallatin. Precision Casting of Tennessee.


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                    • #11
                      Very good!! Keep your eyes open and learn all you can and by all means, be SAFE!!

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                      • #12
                        It appears to me that you would be a dedicated and loyal employee...People like you are hard to find....If you ever would like to move to Salt Lake City, I would hire you...I just laid off and idiot who only put in 50% all of the time..you sound like you would be very dedicated and give 100%....Move here and you will have a job...good work ethically people are hard to find...good luck with your future in metal..

                        brent

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                        • #13
                          <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by bspooh:
                          It appears to me that you would be a dedicated and loyal employee...People like you are hard to find....If you ever would like to move to Salt Lake City, I would hire you...I just laid off and idiot who only put in 50% all of the time..you sound like you would be very dedicated and give 100%....Move here and you will have a job...good work ethically people are hard to find...good luck with your future in metal..

                          brent
                          </font>
                          Thanks, bspooh, and as much as I would like to move out West (really would, too, never been there but seen lots of pretty pictures) my finances wouldn't support such an endeavor at this time. However, if I get lucky and win the lottery (of course, I'll have to start playing it first) or my finances improve I'll keep your offer in mind.

                          I do know what you mean about having trouble finding people who want to work. I got in trouble at one of my old jobs for working too hard! Nevermind that what I was being paid to do was extremely easy or that I was being paid a good salary for doing what I was doing, people complained that I was working too hard and that I needed to slow down. Drove me nuts!

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                          • #14
                            Its tough being on both sides of the fence sometimes...When I first started working at a machine shop, I also was told that I am working too hard and it makes everyone else look bad...What a crock of sh*t...I was teased about brown nosing...I hate that..I worked my butt off to get where i am now, screw all of the other lazy people...Survival of the fittest is what I believe in, and I survived and all of the other people didn't...You have to worry about yourself in life...I never cared about making friends at jobs...I only wanted to do the best that I could do, so I could earn my way up the corporate ladder...I am now finally where I want to be,..at the top...I laugh at all my past fellow co-workers...

                            Be true, work hard, take pride in what you do, and give 110% even if you are not getting paid...its called dedication...You gotta respect that...

                            brent

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                            • #15
                              Well done many years of happiness to you Tucker. I hope you thoroughly enjoy the job and it leads to your dreams being fulfilled with a machining position later take care buddy. Alistair
                              Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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