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Play in spline shaft and receiver.

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  • Play in spline shaft and receiver.

    Is there a way to reduce or cushion the play between a splined shaft and the receiver?

    Grease wont be appropriate in this case.

    EDIT:
    It needs to slide freely.


    Thanks
    Ken
    Last edited by Ken_Shea; 05-16-2009, 12:59 AM.

  • #2
    How long does it have to last...

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    • #3
      Maybe something like a sheet plastic. Teflon would be too soft I think, Maybe something like polyamide tape (Kapton). Thats pretty tough stuff.

      Comment


      • #4
        I would try Loctite® Form-A-Thread® Stripped Thread Repair.

        It has a release agent that is applied to the bolt. The material is gooped in the hole and the bolt wound in as a mold. After it sets it is supposed to be able to hold the equivalent of a grade 5 fastener. Seems to me that a spline shaft would be a very similar application.
        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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        • #5
          Originally posted by A.K. Boomer
          How long does it have to last...
          haha, yeah, that's always the question.



          macona, there is some heat, I would guess too much for plastic sheet.

          Evan, once again you have hit on a good suggestion, have some here and that is worth a try.

          The part will function well enough as is, just rattles when under a noload.

          It is the reverse clutch plate for a Gravely mower.

          Thanks
          Ken

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          • #6
            If that doesn't work then peen each spline lightly along the top to widen it. If you make it too tight then get out a fine file. That took the rattle out of my el-cheapo drill press.

            [edit]

            First thing to try is to install the spline in different positions to see if it fits more tightly.
            Last edited by Evan; 05-16-2009, 09:19 AM.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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            • #7
              Yes it is why I asked how long it needs to last as I was thinking along the lines of what Evan stated except using JB weld and wax on the male splines for releasing --- either way you go I would like to add an important note if you take the filler approach --- after assembly you need to torsionally load the parts in the direction of the way they will run and hold them there till the filler is set up -- if you dont do this you may cause a situation in which the shaft runs way cocked and causes severe vibration.

              I have another one for you and depending on your load application it could prove to be good also,

              Wax male splines (you can do a heat and dip or just use a little propane torch for slight temp) and load female splines up with firm body silicon and coat male too (after its cooled with a thin coating of wax) - slide together and again torsionally load in running direction and let set --- heat unit slightly to melt wax on male splines and slide out -- now go in center of female splines with small wire bush and remove silicone from center of spline yoke but leave it at both ends --- then pack center with boat trailer wheel bearing grease -- Now you have a spline drive that wont rattle due to the silicone on each ends and its also a semi-sealed unit that will not be as susceptible to dirty conditions, it will also handle as much constant load that you can throw at it due to you pre-loading the part in the direction it will be running so the load goes to the metal not the filler - want to get fancy ? install a zirk fitting in the center.
              Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 05-16-2009, 10:09 AM.

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              • #8
                The pressure will blow the silicone out as if it wasn't there.
                Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                • #9
                  Nope -- thats not how its worked for me anyways --- first off there is no pressure to speak of on the silicone if the shaft is always loaded in one direction - second is thats why you use a very firm body silicone for when the shaft has to free-run and there might be a little backlash --- third is you take a wire brush and some brake clean to the female splines before applying - but like I first stated - it depends on the load application.

                  But if you want to get picky your the one that missed telling him to pre-load the shafts while curing - that's a total fuqe as not only will it be assembled half cocked but it will also be relying on the filler material instead of the metal as a load bearing part --- it will lose tolerance quickly while wallowing out the filler material

                  Furthermore -- re-assembling the splines in different places is a hit and miss and also needs warning in the miss-alignment department.

                  any other questions?
                  Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 05-16-2009, 11:31 AM.

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                  • #10
                    first off there is no pressure to speak of on the silicone if the shaft is always loaded in one direction
                    There is if you put a grease nipple on it. In goes the grease, out comes the silicone. Simple hydraulics.

                    But if you want to get picky your the one that missed telling him to pre-load the shafts while curing
                    What if it turns both directions?

                    Furthermore -- re-assembling the splines in different places is a hit and miss and also needs warning in the miss-alignment department.
                    This isn't a vehicle driveshaft. It won't matter.

                    Any other off the mark comments?
                    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Evan
                      There is if you put a grease nipple on it. In goes the grease, out comes the silicone. Simple hydraulics.
                      Simple hydraulics if a simple hillbilly is using the grease gun -- don't godzilla the damn thing - a few pumps and when you feel a slight resistance then STOP!



                      What if it turns both directions?
                      That's why I threw in that "crazy lil" clause about "DEPENDING ON YOUR LOAD APPLICATION" I put it in larger letters this time so you could read it...



                      This isn't a vehicle driveshaft. It won't matter.
                      Just because a driveshaft is not being used in a vehicle doesnt mean its exempt from any of the forces - and in fact its the forces that are enacting upon it that are the only relevant issues. Same goes in opposite - Point being is there are "vehicles" that are designed to freewheel upon de-accel therefore they have no loads in the opposite direction


                      Any other off the mark comments?

                      Nope -- I think that about sums it up quite nicely --- regrets, AK
                      Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 05-16-2009, 04:16 PM.

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                      • #12
                        FWIW, kapton can withstand being immersed in molten solder.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          What about that red Chinese dragon fat,
                          takes 3 nuclear explosions to remove that crap off anything...................

                          .
                          .

                          Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Loading it in the direction of torque should be a good idea, or would that be in the opposite direction of torque??..... anyway, I know what you mean. It drives in one direction only, the load in the opposite would be inertial only, should be small by comparison and also not sudden.

                            Going to try the thread locker suggestion, because it would be the simplest.

                            Still have the equipment I used years ago to inject high strength polymer into ball joints, king pins etc, super strong stuff, not what I would call fluid at 350 degrees but flows under pressure, don't think those temperatures would be reached under normal operating conditions and would soon solidify when the temp drops below that. That would require a grease fitting, my second approach should the thread locker not work out.

                            Thanks
                            Ken




                            Originally posted by John Stevenson
                            What about that red Chinese dragon fat,
                            takes 3 nuclear explosions to remove that crap off anything...................

                            .
                            Tell me more about this Red Chinese Dragon Fat

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Just because a driveshaft is not being used in a vehicle doesnt mean its exempt from any of the forces - and in fact its the forces that are enacting upon it that are the only relevant issues. Same goes in opposite - Point being is there are "vehicles" that are designed to freewheel upon de-accel therefore they have no loads in the opposite direction
                              Oh? Name one. It is illegal to use so called "coaster" drives on a road vehicle. They used to make bolt on overdrives that coasted but they were banned when it was discovered that engine braking helped to save wheel brakes from destruction on long hills. In fact current auto xmissions do the opposite, they lock up at hiway speed.

                              Regardless, what Ken is talking about is the sort of rattle you get in a poorly fitted drill press quill, not a vehicle drive shaft. Comparisons to a vehicle driveshaft are meaningless. It isn't the type of forces that matter so much as the magnitude.

                              Don't feel hesitant to ask my advice on these matters in the future.
                              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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