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  • Slots in Drill Press Base

    What are the slots in a drill press base for? They also have mounting holes around the edge to fasten it to the floor. But the base is machined flat and some have t-slots in the base. I cant imagine mounting work on the base because the head oin a drill press doesnt move vertically, only the spindle moves down but only a few inches..

  • #2
    Good question. My old Delta drill press has two long parallel slots in the base- and four round mounting holes in the corners.

    Hmmm...

    Mark

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    • #3
      Slots

      That's a very good question that I have often wondered about.
      Bill
      I cut it off twice and it's still too short!

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      • #4
        I have several times needed to drill some object way too tall to clamp to the drill table. In those instances, swing the regular table clear out of the way, clamp the work piece to the base slots and drill away. Also one could mount a large angle plate to the drill base, opening many more options. JIM
        jim

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        • #5
          What Jimmstruk said. I have a 1955 Craftsman 1/2" drill press with the typical slotted base. I got tired of chips falling down through them and filling up under the base. I took a piece of 1/8" stainless plate and welded four pins in it. I just set that down on top of the base and the pins line up with the holes and keep it from moving.

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          • #6
            Well.. saw a photo once of Henry Ford spinning crankshafts on a drill press polishing them.

            Anybody got one of them tooling setups on theirs??
            Excuse me, I farted.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by gnm109
              What Jimmstruk said. I have a 1955 Craftsman 1/2" drill press with the typical slotted base. I got tired of chips falling down through them and filling up under the base. I took a piece of 1/8" stainless plate and welded four pins in it. I just set that down on top of the base and the pins line up with the holes and keep it from moving.
              I did the same thing but as a woodworker (at that time) did it with
              a peice of "Masonite" and two little strips of wood glued to it.
              Keeps the sawdust and chips out from under.
              ...lew...

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              • #8
                If there are tee slots, clamps would be logical, and the head of a drill press does move up and down.

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                • #9
                  The slots in the table are for clamping your vise or your workpiece down. You can also just clamp your clamp to the table and put your vise against it to keep it from spinning if it grabs.
                  The slots in the base as stated above are for drilling long objects that are too tall to fit on the table. Sometimes you need to use spacers to achieve the right height.
                  OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                  THINK HARDER

                  BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                  MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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                  • #10
                    It should be obvious that the table can be swung out of the way and work mounted on the base and the head lowered to drill tall heavy work.

                    On the other hand, on some drill presses the head can only be lowered about half way but the work can be spaced up toward the head.
                    It's only ink and paper

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                    • #11
                      Of course the last (3) replies are sarcastic.

                      As stated in a previous post,"open your eyes,ears and mind!

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                      • #12
                        I wouldn't say sarcastic as much as blunt observations. There comes a point at which the mind should say;

                        "Well, let me see, this table has slots in it and the base has slots in it. Can I reasonably assume that the slots in the base can be used just like the table slots with a taller work piece and drop the head down to drill it? Well, I believe that is posible, yes, I can do that and the holes in the corners, well I believe I can bolt the drill press to the floor with them."

                        Now that would be a perceptive mind that is using common sense and logic to solve a question.

                        Now this post is somewhat sarcastic I suppose .
                        It's only ink and paper

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                        • #13
                          Holy baseplate problems

                          Originally posted by Lew Hartswick
                          I did the same thing but as a woodworker (at that time) did it with
                          a peice of "Masonite" and two little strips of wood glued to it.
                          Keeps the sawdust and chips out from under.
                          ...lew...
                          I too cover up the base plate with masonite due to the "Murphy Factor" that states that the tiny drill bit that you fumble and drop from the chuck will fall straight through the slot into the abyss.
                          Jim (KB4IVH)

                          Only fools abuse their tools.

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                          • #14
                            none of my drill presses have movable heads. i think the t-slots in the bases is just one of those things where 80 years ago some DPs had movable heads, and no one ever bothered to change the base designs when the heads became immovable.

                            andy b.
                            The danger is not that computers will come to think like men - but that men will come to think like computers. - some guy on another forum not dedicated to machining

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                            • #15
                              The same bases fellows were also used for table models.
                              Also, some tables can rotate 90 degrees, allowing a vise to be clamped on the table and another on the base for holding and centerdrilling long shafts
                              Rich
                              Green Bay, WI

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