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Preventing rust in an electric motor?

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  • Preventing rust in an electric motor?

    Is there any way to stop the iron core of a motor from rusting?



    It's the I dont know how old pool pump motor. and if I don't run it for four days or more, it's tough to start. Left it outside all winter and this is what I found...I carefully sanded the rust off and got it running. Would LPS3 or Boeshield T9 work to stop this?


    Andy

  • #2
    You can sand off the rust with a drum sander and put a thin coat of paint.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by paulx
      You can sand off the rust with a drum sander and put a thin coat of paint.
      Well, you could CAREFULLY sand off the rust, even going so far as to
      make a temp guard or shield to keep the sandpaper off the end winding's.

      Then purchase the red insulating varnish (it's available in spray cans)
      and coat it well.

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      • #4
        I was carefull with the Dremel Where would I pick up the varnish -a good hardware store? I can't see Homeys having something like that.


        Andy

        Comment


        • #5
          Andy,
          there was a post about it a little while ago.

          I believe CRC products, or one of the major paint co.'s

          "I was carefull with the Dremel "

          We soon shall see how carefull you were with that thing....

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          • #6
            It's been running since yesterday, so couldn't have hacked it up *too* bad . I'll search for that post, thanks..


            Andy

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            • #7
              Grainger's has the insulating varnish. I think it's called Glyptal. Also, I didn't check McMaster-Carr but since they have everything else it's a safe bet they have it too.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Langanobob
                Grainger's has the insulating varnish. I think it's called Glyptal. Also, I didn't check McMaster-Carr but since they have everything else it's a safe bet they have it too.
                Eastwood also sells it, but boy has the price gone up $25 since two years ago. The link and prices are:

                http://eastwood.resultspage.com/sear...43&submit.y=12

                Bill

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by paulx
                  You can sand off the rust with a drum sander and put a thin coat of paint.
                  The power factor (and magnetic flux) of an induction motor is inversely proportional to the air gap width. In other words, you weaken the motor by increasing the gap width.

                  I would soak the whole assembly in Evap-O-Rust.
                  "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bigbill04
                    Eastwood also sells it, but boy has the price gone up $25 since two years ago. The link and prices are:

                    http://eastwood.resultspage.com/sear...43&submit.y=12

                    Bill
                    I knew I heard that name somewhere before...I might be able to get less than retail at Grainger, let me check there first.


                    Andy

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by lazlo
                      I would soak the whole assembly in Evap-O-Rust.

                      I agree 500%.... or more..
                      Last edited by lakeside53; 05-23-2009, 05:21 PM.

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                      • #12
                        The power factor (and magnetic flux) of an induction motor is inversely proportional to the air gap width
                        Not quite. It's proportional to the ratio of the air gap width to the diameter of the rotor. With a rotor the size of the one in that motor a few thou isn't going to make a measurable difference.
                        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                        • #13
                          I wouldn't use sandpaper. Dremel has small wire wheels and they won't remove any metal, just rust. But like Evan says, a few thousanths won't make any noticable difference.

                          Don't they actually dip motor windings in that varnish to prevent the windings from vibrating as well as to stop rust/
                          Paul A.
                          SE Texas

                          Make it fit.
                          You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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                          • #14
                            You want to be careful not to let the wire wheel spin off the laminations and onto the windings. I would scrub it with a plastic pot scrubber and some vinegar to remove the rust and then rinse well in water. When dry then spray with electrical varnish. Not just a light spray but soak it well, let it run off and dry for a day or two.
                            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                            • #15
                              If you use evaporust, you won't need to use any wire brush... or acid (vinegar). Really is good stuff.

                              Before any varnish, I'd bake it in a convection oven set to less than 200F for a few hours.
                              Last edited by lakeside53; 05-23-2009, 05:20 PM.

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