Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

European G 1/8 pipe threads?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • European G 1/8 pipe threads?

    I'm overhauling an Eisele (German) pneumatic cold saw, and it has a cracked male branch tee on the air intake, where the male threaded section broke off in the electronic solenoid opening.

    It's about a 1/8" diameter, but a 1/8" NPT doesn't want to thread into the solenoid without forcing it. I just looked up the part number on the web, and it's an "Origa" solenoid, and the datasheet lists the port as "G 1/8".

    That's a hard term to Google, and the Black Vitruvian Man Book doesn't list it. After spending awhile in Machinery's Handbook, I found a comment that says that British Standard Pipe Threads use designations that start with "G", followed by the orifice size.

    So it looks like "G 1/8" in BSPT is 28 TPI, Whitworth. Does that sound right? Is it possible that Eisele, a German company, would use a British Witworth pipe thread??
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

  • #2
    That is an ISO designation thread, very common in Europe.

    From the FESTO web-site

    What is the difference between a G-thread and an R-thread?
    G-threads have a cylindrical form in accordance with the EN-ISO 228-1 standard. R-threads have a conical form in accordance with the ISO 7-1 standard. In the case of a thread of size 1/8", for example, the threads are specified as G1/8 or R1/8. Male G-threads (cylindrical) can only be screwed into female G-threads. Male R-threads (conical) can be screwed into female G or R-threads.

    Follow this link for the dims.

    http://www.festo.com/cms/en-us_us/4298.htm

    Comment


    • #3
      That is an ISO designation thread, very common in Europe.

      From the FESTO web-site

      What is the difference between a G-thread and an R-thread?
      G-threads have a cylindrical form in accordance with the EN-ISO 228-1 standard. R-threads have a conical form in accordance with the ISO 7-1 standard. In the case of a thread of size 1/8", for example, the threads are specified as G1/8 or R1/8. Male G-threads (cylindrical) can only be screwed into female G-threads. Male R-threads (conical) can be screwed into female G or R-threads.

      Follow this link for the dims.

      http://www.festo.com/cms/en-us_us/4298.htm

      This will also help

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British...rd_pipe_thread

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by gda
        That is an ISO designation thread, very common in Europe.

        G-threads have a cylindrical form in accordance with the EN-ISO 228-1 standard.

        Follow this link for the dims.

        http://www.festo.com/cms/en-us_us/4298.htm
        OK, so the G pipe threads are not tapered, like an American NPS, but if I'm reading the Festo document correctly, the G 1/8 is in fact a British Standard (Witworth) Pipe Thread. It doesn't say as much on the Festo web page, but the 28 TPI, and 9.728 mm major diameter (ain't Metrification great? ) match Machinery's Handbook spec for the BSPT 1/8.

        Thanks gda!!!
        "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by lazlo
          OK, so the G pipe threads are not tapered, like an American NPS, but if I'm reading the Festo document correctly, the G 1/8 is in fact a British Standard (Witworth) Pipe Thread. It doesn't say as much on the Festo web page, but the 28 TPI, and 9.728 mm major diameter (ain't Metrification great? ) match Machinery's Handbook spec for the BSPT 1/8.

          Thanks gda!!!
          Thats because the europeans prefer the ISO designations, but many here still refer to BSP British Standard Pipe Parrelle and BSPT British Standard Pipe Taper.

          Steve Larner

          Comment


          • #6
            1`/8 bsp t or p will fit, if p then a bit of the old ptfe tape and the white festo poly washer
            mark

            Comment


            • #7
              G fittings are BSPP with Whitworth threads with the 55 degree thread angle and is pretty much standard on anything coming out of Europe. These pages gives you all the dimensions you should need for the male fittings.

              http://mdmetric.com/tech/bsppthreadspecs.htm

              http://mdmetric.com/pdf/Thdfrm2.pdf

              You can get the copper seals for these fittings at a Swagelok distributor.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by SDL
                Thats because the europeans prefer the ISO designations, but many here still refer to BSP British Standard Pipe Parrelle and BSPT British Standard Pipe Taper.
                Guys, thanks for all the replies!! I was able to order the correct "ISO-G" fittings from MSC last night during the 35% off sale.

                I can finally say that I own a machine with a Whitworth thread

                Pulling the responses together, if anyone on the Left side of the Pond is looking for these fittings, MSC, McMaster et al calls the BSPP (non tapered) Whitworth fittings ISO-G, and the BSPT (tapered) fittings ISO-R. Seems like the tapered ISO-R fittings are much more prevalent.

                By the way, there are also true Metric pipe fittings, so I'm surprised that a German machine tool manufacturer would use British Whitworth pipe fittings instead of Metric.
                "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Quote
                  "By the way, there are also true Metric pipe fittings, so I'm surprised that a German machine tool manufacturer would use British Whitworth pipe fittings instead of Metric."
                  ___

                  It seems to have escaped some of you guys in the colonies,but BSP was adapted as the standard for pipe threads by ISO and every country in the world except USA and one other small country somewhere._A lot of years ago now.______________

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mark McGrath
                    It seems to have escaped some of you guys in the colonies,but BSP was adapted as the standard for pipe threads by ISO and every country in the world except USA and one other small country somewhere.
                    That doesn't explain why there are ISO standard Metric pipe threads?

                    Parker, Festo et al all stock "ISO-M" pipe fittings, which are ISO standard pipe threads:

                    Metric Thread Standards
                    M - Metric Screw Threads M profile

                    Applicable Standards

                    * ISO 261 ISO GENERAL PURPOSE METRIC SCREW THREADS - GENERAL PLAN
                    * ASME B1.13M METRIC SCREW THREADS: M PROFILE
                    * FED-STD-H28/21 METRIC SCREW-THREADS
                    Last edited by lazlo; 05-27-2009, 03:46 PM.
                    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      There might be a metric thread but doesn't mean to say anyone uses them other than the Japanese, As mark says the BSP / gas threads have been around for ages and are in use all over the world.

                      .
                      .

                      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by John Stevenson
                        There might be a metric thread but doesn't mean to say anyone uses them other than the Japanese.
                        There's a JIS (Japanese) pipe thread standard too. Parker and Festo stock those as well
                        And just to make things more confusing, the BSPP, BSPT pipe threads have Metric orifices. Yes, they have an Imperial thread pitch (28 threads per inch), Imperial Major and Minor diameters (G 1/8 is 1/8" OD), with an English thread form (Whitworth) and Metric tubing

                        So there's the US NPS/NPT standard, the British BSPP/BSPT standard, the ISO-M (Metric) pipe thread standard, and the JIS standard. It's amazing anything works.

                        By the way, the British Pipe Threads are almost unheard of in the 'States...

                        What do the Canucks use? My Excello has NPT coolant drain ports...
                        Last edited by lazlo; 05-27-2009, 04:51 PM.
                        "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Don't forget AN (Army Navy) fittings.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mark McGrath
                            Quote
                            "By the way, there are also true Metric pipe fittings, so I'm surprised that a German machine tool manufacturer would use British Whitworth pipe fittings instead of Metric."
                            ___

                            It seems to have escaped some of you guys in the colonies,but BSP was adapted as the standard for pipe threads by ISO and every country in the world except USA and one other small country somewhere._A lot of years ago now.______________
                            Yes, and don't we have some fun when we get US pipe threads over here,.......... John Deere are very good at combining 2 if not 3 standards on the same machine.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              They say thats the wonderful thing about "standards" , there are so
                              many of them. This has been a case in point.
                              ...lew...

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X