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  • OT: Cool Electric Car Build

    http://etischer.com/awdev/

    Just thought it was interesting, and a good conversion.

    Enjoy.
    --Doozer
    DZER

  • #2
    Nice conversion.

    I've often wondered what it costs in real energy to charge up a typical electric car. The people who are in favor of electric cars never talk about the cost of the electricity. Someone, somewhere has to generate it.

    I like the idea of an electric car for commuting. I know that it's not free to operate one, though. Nothing is free.

    Comment


    • #3
      Wow, that's a very impressive conversion -- a lot of machine work too

      Apropos to the motor horsepower discussion, peak horsepower is 2x the continuous hp:

      Received my motor today. It's a Siemens liquid cooled 42hp (90hp peak) 3 phase motor. Part No: 1PV5133-4WS20 W11

      215 - 380 Volt, 282 Amp RMS (400 peak)
      6 pole, 3 Phase AC Induction
      67 Kw peak (33 Kw continuous)
      3500 - 9700 (13,000 Max) RPM
      Weight: 178 lbs

      Used on the EV Ford Ranger
      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by gnm109
        Nice conversion.

        I've often wondered what it costs in real energy to charge up a typical electric car. The people who are in favor of electric cars never talk about the cost of the electricity. Someone, somewhere has to generate it.

        I like the idea of an electric car for commuting. I know that it's not free to operate one, though. Nothing is free.
        It's not free, but it turns out that the efficiency of electric cars is pretty good, and electric power is cheap.

        Let's see: locally diesel is 2.79/gal. A gallon will produce 10 hp for one hour. A hp is 746 watts...so:

        $2.79 1 gal 1 hp $0.37
        - * --- * ----- = ------
        gal 10 hp-hours .746 KW KW-hr

        So electricity is pretty cheap in most areas, compared to liquid fuels.
        Now, an electric car does a lot better job not idling at stop lights; many can also capture the braking energy, etc. However, charging batteries isn't perfectly efficient by any means.... also, the folks I know w/ electric cars
        (none of them Teslas :-)) end up driving them pretty carefully to maximize range, which not everyone does .

        The answer is - it depends. My guess is that you might manage 50% of the cost of driving a Prius, which is pretty good. Of course, if you're fond of long smoky burnouts....

        - Bart
        Bart Smaalders
        http://smaalders.net/barts

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by barts
          Now, an electric car does a lot better job not idling at stop lights; many can also capture the braking energy, etc.
          This guy is actually running regenerative braking. I wonder how much efficiency he's losing running an AC induction motor though (especially the phase conversion).

          Plus, a commercial electric vehicle/hybrid has NiMH or lithium ion batteries -- much higher power density, but I don't know how the charging efficiency compares to the Old School lead-acid batteries this guy is using.
          "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

          Comment


          • #6
            In the first picture, it looks like he is charging it at work so it might be free to him!!

            Comment


            • #7
              clever lad ..he's destined for bigger and better projects, i think you'll be hearing a lot more from him over the years.

              such a lot achieved ..and he's so young ..

              my hats off to him .

              all the best.markj

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by lazlo
                This guy is actually running regenerative braking. I wonder how much efficiency he's losing running an AC induction motor though (especially the phase conversion).

                Plus, a commercial electric vehicle/hybrid has NiMH or lithium ion batteries -- much higher power density, but I don't know how the charging efficiency compares to the Old School lead-acid batteries this guy is using.
                Almost all high-end electric cars use AC motors w/ variable speed drives; the efficiencies at low motor speed are much better and often allow the omission of a transmission entirely.

                I'm not sure of the difference in charging efficiencies, either....

                - Bart
                Bart Smaalders
                http://smaalders.net/barts

                Comment


                • #9
                  This is yet another feel good project and not really about saving money or the planet.

                  My guess is that the payback period for EV conversion is >10 years.

                  The carbon footprint of the batteries and replacing them every 5-6 years will most likely offset any real CO2 reduction.

                  The vehicle only does 20miles and it does 0-50mhp in 10 seconds!

                  If you're really interested in saving money or the planet, buy a small car with a small engine, and use it as little as possible.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It must be nice to have unlimited funds to build something that is supposed to save money. It doesn't save much else. Nice car but very inefficent to turn an IC engined car into an electric.

                    Lead acid batteries aren't all that bad from an environmental standpoint. They only contain several different materials all of which are easy to recycle. The latest Valve Regulated Sealed Lead Acid (VRSLA) batteries have really good charge/discharge characteristics. It's what I have on my e-bike. They will maintain around 80% of full charge if left sitting for two years and are rated to withstand at least 200 full discharge cycles. The only thing really lacking is energy density.
                    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                    • #11
                      being a Kanadian, I always wonder how these things work in - 30 degree weather, when the batteries are cold, they loose capacity. Then you also need heat for the inside of the vehicle.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The lead from lead acid batteries is recycled ..

                        99 percent of it, ever produced, is recycled according to this vid.

                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJj5iIwF8p4

                        you could not say that, for a lot of other things .


                        all the best.markj

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Not had chance to read it all thru but he may be using one of the newer stock fork truck power units.

                          These have normal 24 v / 36 v battery packs and then use a special inverter to get from 24 / 36 volts to 440 volts 3 phase to power a standard off the shelf 3 phase motor, from there to the hydraulic pump.

                          They are done this way as the most expensive part of the lift truck is the big DC motor and it's the most unreliable because of the high amperage needed and brush gear etc.

                          Modern inverter technology means it can control the motor far better than heavy amperage switching circuits and be more reliable.

                          Some of the more heavier gear has the motor inside a water cooled housing.

                          .
                          .

                          Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by John Stevenson
                            Not had chance to read it all thru but he may be using one of the newer stock fork truck power units.
                            He's using a water-cooled 3-phase induction motor from the EV Ford Ranger, with a home-brewed 90 HP inverter: he gutted a modular 2 HP VFD and upsized the IGBT's.
                            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Some of my friends have converted two cars to electric. THe money savings are definately there. These particular cars have range of around 100+ mi and 80 mph top speed.

                              An issue: Chevron owns the patent to use NIMH batteries in cars. Won't license it if it does not use partially gas power.

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