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  • Saftey glasses

    I just threw away another pair of "quality" safety glasses due to excessive scratching causing distortion. How about a recommendation on a decent pair of glasses that are at least a little bit durable and scratch resistant? It seems that no matter what I pay for a pair of these things and no matter how carefully I clean them, even with tissue, they will scratch and mar in short order! Why can't they make them more durable? I once made a temporary safety shield from a clear plastic packing box (I was in a bind and it sure beat nothing!) and that darn thing was 10 times more scratch resistant than a real pair of safety glasses. If a stinkin' plastic box cover is scratch resistant why are the safety lens so soft? That thing laid on top of my tool box for nearly a year and the few times I used it the darn thing cleaned up just fine!

  • #2
    Never clean safety-specs with tissue - it scratches the lenses. Use Bounty kitchen roll.

    Scratching is inevitable, just buy cheap specs. The ones I wear are very light and comfortable and less than £1 each.
    Last edited by Peter.; 06-23-2009, 02:42 PM.
    Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

    Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
    Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
    Monarch 10EE 1942

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    • #3
      I buy the real glass ones, made out of coke-bottom glass or whatever. Really thick and heavy.

      I'm not 100% comfortable with a thin sheet of plastic protecting my eyes from an ejected fragment.
      This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
      Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
      Plastic Operators Dot Com

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Liger Zero
        I buy the real glass ones, made out of coke-bottom glass or whatever. Really thick and heavy.

        I'm not 100% comfortable with a thin sheet of plastic protecting my eyes from an ejected fragment.
        Tend to be uncomfortable over long perods and many change your natural focal length causing headaches. Heavier doesn't always mean stronger either, rigid structures transmit energy (or break) where more flexible ones absorb energy and deform. In the UK it's easy to tell what class of impact resistance a pair have by the code letter. The ones I wear I've trodden on several times without breaking them.
        Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

        Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
        Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
        Monarch 10EE 1942

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        • #5
          Unless the glass lens is shatter proof it will get fragments in your eye. The plastic safety glasses are supposed to withstand impacts and not shatter. They are supposed to flex and not break.

          I don't know how they could treat the glass so it would not break up in some form.
          It's only ink and paper

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          • #6
            I get the pleasure of having to wear safety glasses because my eyesight is just bad enough that I squint when reading a dial or a rule. That leads to a headache after a day of use. Here is how I clean my glasses (polycarb) and get some life out of them.

            1) Wash your hands first.

            2) Swish the specs under running water in the sink. Never ever clean them dry with anything that will rub. All of the hard grit (grinding grit or metal chips) will start the scratching process. Moving them under running water takes off almost all of the bad scratchy stuff.

            3) Run your hand under the water next to clean off anything that might have run on to it from the rinse. Using a liquid non-abrasive soap (Dawn or other dish detergent will work) get a bit on you finger and thumb and lightly move the soap around on the lenses.

            4) Continue to lightly move the soap around and run your hand and the specs under the running water. Do this until you feel all of the slippery soap go away.

            5) Using a new clean paper kitchen towel (the bounty type) lightly wipe the lenses dry. Continue to change the towel to a dry spot until the specs are dry.

            Yes, I know this seems a bit much but it has served me well over the years and keeps my prescription specs as well as the cheap safety specs scratch free for longer than any other method I have tried.
            rock~
            Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

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            • #7
              I think it's a plastic coating like shatter-proof glass. Honestly don't know.
              This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
              Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
              Plastic Operators Dot Com

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              • #8
                I buy whatever polycarbonate (Lexan) safety glasses are on sale at the usual suspects with "scratch resistant coating." They do last longer than the cheap safety glasses, especially if the shop isn't air conditioned and you're sweating a lot. I haven't had a pair that lasted more than 2 months though...
                "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                • #9
                  I second Rockrat's method. I have the polycarb lenses and sometimes it seems like they are a magnet for oil! The dish soap realy cuts thru the oil and gets you a nice clean lens.

                  Craig

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                  • #10
                    Ok, I just ordered 6 pair (AO Safety), shipping was the same as 1 pair, and at the same time I also ordered some cleaning cloths just for the glasses. Seems as if maybe I need to keep some clean rinse water in the shop since I don't have running water there yet to rinse the grit off before wiping, this last pair I just threw away was less than two weeks old. Still can't figure why that box cover was so much more durable and scratch resistant than real lens though but it probably has little impact resistance, I would not consider using a home-made safety lens but I just wondered why they can't make the real lens at least as good (scratch resistant) as a cheap box cover?

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                    • #11
                      http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3...glMDNGRTJZRRbl

                      I got started wearing these when I worked at 3M. They hold up very well and don't give me the usual headache from long term use (which is typically 2hrs or less for other glasses to make the noggin ache).

                      They ain't cheap, but at a pair every other year right now - I don't care.

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                      • #12
                        These are what we wear at work. Most major building sites in London are mandatory safety eyewear for all trades. They are Class 1 optical quality and very light. Impact resistance is Class F (low-energy impact, 45m/s) which is not suitable for percussion tools and certainly wouldn't stop an exploded abrasive wheel but then what would. They'd be perfect for keeping out flying chips from your flycutter. The best bit about them from my point of view is that they allow ear defenders to seal perfectly on your head - something that most wire-arm or round-arm glasses don't do and even if they do the arms get pressed uncomfortably into your head.

                        We use these for bright sunlight work and the ISE03X clear ones which strangely are not listed on the site.

                        http://www.safety-source.co.uk/produ...istory=related
                        Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                        Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                        Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                        Monarch 10EE 1942

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I also use Rockrat's method to clean my glass prescription lenses. Be careful to use a towel like Bounty - many others and face tissues have oils that and smear up lenses or a lot of lint. And almost hot water with very dilute liquid dish soap. (I like Ajax)

                          If the lenses are really dirty I use rubbing alcohol, gently, with the Bounty towel. 91% if you can get it. Then the dish soap method.

                          For working (home shop) I use a full face shield. That way I still have my prescription (glass) lenses and can see clearly. It goes on easily and tips up easily so I don't mind using it. Does get dirty so I wipe the plastic off once in awhile but because it's not so close to my eyes the dirt and wear on the plastic isn't such a problem.

                          Gary

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by gfphoto
                            I also use Rockrat's method to clean my glass prescription lenses. Be careful to use a towel like Bounty - many others and face tissues have oils that and smear up lenses or a lot of lint. And almost hot water with very dilute liquid dish soap. (I like Ajax)
                            Good point, I seem to remember grabbing a paper towel that was in a little box on the counter and having smears all over my specs. I read the box and the towels had shae butter (what ever the hell that is?) on them for the wifeys hands. That crap took twice as long to clean off as the way oil did.

                            rock~
                            Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

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                            • #15
                              I just wondered why they can't make the real lens at least as good (scratch resistant) as a cheap box cover?
                              Easy. Things that are scratch resistant are hard. When you are talking plastic that also means brittle.
                              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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