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  • #16
    Problem with a slotter is Tiffie that although you could get the biggest gear on mine you couldn't get anywhere near the outside because of restrictions in the slides movements as the rotary part of the table is built in.

    My old slotter could have done it because that one had had the RT removed at some stage and replaced by a XY table.

    That could be removed and a RT mounted on it off centre so the edges could be reached.

    Dave if you want to farm the job out, I thought you wanted to do it yourself, I can recommend Cornish Engineering in Nottingham, they will speak to you.
    Don't be put off when John answers the phone, he's 84 but bright as a button, that guy has forgotten more about gear cutting that I'll ever have chance to learn.

    I think his max gear size is eight foot diameter by two foot face and will go down to 1DP.

    .

    .
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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    • #17
      Davek0974, go for it if you can come up with the horizontal kit (if you dont already have one). Malc-y explains very nicely the kit, Timleech shows how to use in his pictures. That makes the Bport into a horizontal machine and does not require any extra floor space. Also the angle head attachment used alone opens up many more options on other jobs not otherwise easily done.JIM
      jim

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      • #18
        Dave, let me know if you go ahead and are struggling for a cutter.
        just checked, I've got 4DP nos 1 & 2. Don't really want to sell them but I'm sure we could arrange something.

        Tim

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        • #19
          If the horizontal attachment has the balls to do it, that seems to be the best option, costy but useful in the future.

          I think they have a 1" arbor, but dont know about the cutters yet, it may need a bush or bigger arbor?

          Thanks for the offer Tim, i'll PM when ready.

          Dave
          If it does'nt fit, hit it.
          https://ddmetalproducts.co.uk
          http://www.davekearley.co.uk

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          • #20
            Nobody mentioned the Bridgy Slotting Head???

            Regards Ian.
            You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

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            • #21
              Yes, you did.

              Just now.

              .
              .

              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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              • #22
                Is a Bridgy horizontal attachment man enough for the task??

                Dave
                If it does'nt fit, hit it.
                https://ddmetalproducts.co.uk
                http://www.davekearley.co.uk

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                • #23
                  If only .......................................

                  Originally posted by John Stevenson
                  Problem with a slotter is Tiffie that although you could get the biggest gear on mine you couldn't get anywhere near the outside because of restrictions in the slides movements as the rotary part of the table is built in.

                  My old slotter could have done it because that one had had the RT removed at some stage and replaced by a XY table.

                  That could be removed and a RT mounted on it off centre so the edges could be reached.

                  ...........................................
                  ............................................

                  .
                  Thanks John.

                  I got spoiled years ago in the milling section of which the shaping/slotting sub-section was part.

                  They were really big reliable accurate first-class machines - "Butler"s - every one. They really were incredible machines. I thoroughly enjoyed my time there - same as the gear-making section - hobbers, shapers etc. Mills were a range from Cincinnati, some Chec machines as well as a couple of "Victoria" horizontals - just like yours (great machines) - plus others.

                  That's why I keep banging on about my next (dream) mill - Chinese of course - being a horizontal/vertical combo turret mill with a slotting attachment.

                  If the discussion has helped the OP and anyone else as regards gear-making, cutter making and the uses of slotters it can only be judged a success.

                  Many thanks.

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                  • #24
                    I think so in cast iron.
                    Especially if you pre gash first with a thin saw.
                    .

                    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                    • #25
                      If you made a cutter to go in the collet chuck, similar to an end mill but with the profile of the "Slot" between the teeth, tilt the vertical head over by 90Deg (Like the horizontal drive but in LINE with the table) and mill the slots.

                      Regards Ian.

                      Sorry, Pre-gash most of the waste out first, as his worship has suggested.
                      You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

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                      • #26
                        A very different size of job.

                        Over 30 yrs ago I needed a gear for my model steam roller. I could have stolen a change gear from the set of my ancient lathe ( 10 dp 70 teeth) but needed it on the lathe, I had little equipment, less knowledge and No spare money. One day i spied a large washer of about the right size hanging as an additional weight on a friend.s power hacksaw, I came home with the washer, found it was exactly the size I needed and came up with a scheme. I bolted the washer to the gear, drilled a 1/16th hole at the bottom of every tooth, scribed the teeth on, and hacksawed 70 vees. Then I bought 3 triangular files and filed for 3 weeks until I got a gear that looked passable!!, I built a rough frame, meshed it with a proper gear and filed until it would run smoothly with reasonable backlash. The gear is still in use on the very hard worked model. Obviously you would not want to file very large gears, but if you had a way of getting approximate teeth ( Of the right number!!!) on the blanks then perhaps a little filing could be used to smooth any major roughnesses. I knew a fellow with a full size engine who built up his terribly worn gears with weld, shaped them with an angle grinder, ran them in with lots of grinding paste and his son is still running the engine 40 yrs later, Have fun work safe. Regards David Powell.

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                        • #27
                          Getting properly stiffed and shafted - all for the good gear!!

                          Originally posted by Davek0974
                          Is a Bridgy horizontal attachment man enough for the task??

                          Dave
                          Dave, I would think that it might.

                          The biggest problem in most cases with larger gears particularly is keeping everything on the mill out of the swept arc of the outside diameter of the gear blank. A stub arbor in the vertical head of a BP mill may be better than a stub arbor in the standard BP vertical head.

                          A horizontal milling attachment may or may not be better - but as before - I will leave advising on that to those that have used them.

                          This post by Tim Leech makes it very clear!! Note how far the arbor supports are apart and how slim the arbor, even with the stiffening of spacer, is.

                          Originally posted by Timleech
                          Here it is, the pics are still out there although I gave up the ISP a couple of years ago







                          It's a flywheel of about 150 to 200 kg, rotary table hooked up to my CNC Bridgy but the job is on a manual mill.

                          Tim

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                          • #28
                            Similar to Dave Powel's story, my BIL was in the Navy. He was an engine room chief. One day, a brass gear that somehow fed the ship's speed to the bridge failed. While his crew was content to wait until they got back to port to get a new part, my BIL got a blank and cut a new gear with a hacksaw. He made the crew watch. It lasted until they got in to port.

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