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That crazy Canadian steam engine guy is at it again---

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  • #16
    I have had numerous people emailing me and asking about the flywheels, and if they can build the engine as a conventional engine without the hit and miss function and the governors. The answer is---#1--The flywheels CAN be made from aluminum, and they CAN be made to 1/2" thick. ---and the non governor flywheel does NOT have to have the long extended hub as shown on my drawing.---I only made the extended hub that long so that both flywheels would be spaced out the same distance from the crankcase, and I wanted the extended hub to drive an o-ring drive pulley to power some secondary equipment.
    ----#2-You can build the engine with 2 identical flywheels and skip the governors. You will need to build a cam-hub similar to the one in the attached picture.--Please note that I built this from a "scrap" peice of brass and 3/32" steel rod---there is a bit of machining at the extreme outer diameter of the peice in the picture which serves no purpose and doesn't have to be there----And the one in the drawing will not be as thick as the one I show in the picture.


    Last edited by brian Rupnow; 06-30-2009, 01:27 PM.
    Brian Rupnow

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    • #17
      Well boys---Here ya go!!! Its running in hit and miss mode. After 2 hours of messing about with tiny, tiny, tiny #0-80 socket head capscrews and adjusting the timing, it runs. This video was made in the first 5 minutes of operation, so its a bit choppy. Its been setting on the corner of my desk running now for half an hour, and its getting much smoother. I am happy as a pig in mud!!!
      Brian Rupnow

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      • #18
        Congrats Brian!
        Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

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        • #19
          Another mighty fine engine Brian,congrats!
          I just need one more tool,just one!

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          • #20
            I may have shot myself in the foot a little by making the flywheels from steel. My theory was that if the flywheels were uber heavy, they would let the engine "coast" longer between firing cycles. What I overlooked was the fact that since they are so heavy, it takes considerably more kinetic energy to overcome their "resting inertia", so the engine has to fire 5 or 6 times to get the engine spinning fast enough to actuate the governors. If the flywheels had been made of aluminum, which is 1/3 the weight of steel, the firing profile would probably have been quite different. When I get back from the Canadian Rod Tour, I am going to build a small scale varying load machine to demonstrate how applied load affects the hit and miss cycle as the engine runs.
            Brian Rupnow

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