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  • Using Mill Vise Rotating Base?

    I have a 8" Yuasa Mill Vise mounted on a rotating base on my Bridgeport. The base was used to get the vise to the right height to work on gun stocks. I have never used it. How often do you guys use this feature. I have also been reluctant to Tilt the head on my mill. I have several projects that are going to require these moves. Do you have any Tips on resetting or Tramming the Head?
    Byron Boucher
    Burnet, TX

  • #2
    I use a rotating base every now and then. They can be quite handy when you need them. I also find they are easier to square up since there is just one pivot.

    Tramming the mill is an important "skill" to develop. It will go out of tram naturally as a result of heavy cuts. Bridgeports (or clones) are very easy to tram. Just take your time and be patient. I was told to always start with the X axis first, but I don't know that it really matters.

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    • #3
      Tramming

      I like to use an Indicol to tram my head and usually do about a 12 inch diameter sweep of the table with about .005 inch preload on my last word. Here is a listing on an Indicol which allows you to indicate a hole in with out removing the tool / cutter, (also available from Enco) .
      http://www.penntoolco.com/catalog/pr...categoryID=583

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      • #4
        this subject comes up from time to time, most it seems including me view the rotating base as a detriment, potential source of error and cuts into daylight....but if it serves you, peace.

        agree with FT on tramming the mill, its something you do all the time, not just after moving the head (which is another feature i almost never use)

        btw, if you do move the head, make sure you have a spotter. Those worm gears shouldn't take all the weight and there have been injuries and at least one death from heads falling esp on bigger mills
        .

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Mcgyver
          this subject comes up from time to time, most it seems including me view the rotating base as a detriment, potential source of error and cuts into daylight....but if it serves you, peace.
          FWIW: I have rotating bases for all my mill vises, and I've never used them. On the Millrite, it was because of the daylight issue. Now, with my Excello, I have plenty of space under the quill, but I'd still rather have the precision of a rotab if I'm cutting an angle.
          "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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          • #6
            Hmm ... good thoughts on the swivel base. I've only used them in shops that didn't have rotary tables. Now that I own that 2D (rotary head mill) I bought a Parlec vise without a swivel base. I figured it wouldn't be neccessary with the rotary head feature. If you have a rotab, you probably don't need the swivel base. Nothing pisses me off more than taking a heavy hogging cut and watching the vise slip away from perpindicularity. Not that I can really blame the vise ... I don't think these vises were intended to do what I was doing with them.

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            • #7
              Tramming your head should be a routine you get into. At least check it periodically!

              Having just finished my first year's machinist program (it was necessary to get to the advanced courses), I saw many newbies struggling to tram the head. They'd take hours. It's just not that difficult once you "get it" (the procedure, that is).

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              • #8
                I have one on a little 4" vise that I use on average once a year, normally on something where accuracy is not that important like holes in a mounting bracket or making an adjustment slot. None of my 6" vises have them and I have never needed one. My take is that if it comes free with a vise, take it. If not, I would not spend good money for one unless a project demanded it.

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                • #9
                  Fit the rotating base when you need it. Leave it on the shelf the rest of the time, simple.

                  Phil

                  Originally posted by Boucher
                  I have a 8" Yuasa Mill Vise mounted on a rotating base on my Bridgeport. The base was used to get the vise to the right height to work on gun stocks. I have never used it. How often do you guys use this feature. I have also been reluctant to Tilt the head on my mill. I have several projects that are going to require these moves. Do you have any Tips on resetting or Tramming the Head?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by philbur
                    Fit the rotating base when you need it. Leave it on the shelf the rest of the time, simple.

                    Phil
                    I did that for a while, kept the base mounted for a while... Really didn't seem to be enough difference to notice, so I've lately just left it in place.

                    Must just be me, but lately I seem to find myself semi-frequently doing non-critical (often just aesthetic) cuts on an angle. Saturday night I needed to extend the slots on a bracket for my motorcycle by approximately 0.100 (fitting a new seat). But they were at some random angle to the otherwise square bracket. Loosen the vise, kick it around and eye-ball the angle, drop a 1/4" EM into the slot and crank, swing back and dial the vise square, done...
                    Russ
                    Master Floor Sweeper

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BadDog
                      I did that for a while, kept the base mounted for a while... Really didn't seem to be enough difference to notice, so I've lately just left it in place.

                      Must just be me, but lately I seem to find myself semi-frequently doing non-critical (often just aesthetic) cuts on an angle. Saturday night I needed to extend the slots on a bracket for my motorcycle by approximately 0.100 (fitting a new seat). But they were at some random angle to the otherwise square bracket. Loosen the vise, kick it around and eye-ball the angle, drop a 1/4" EM into the slot and crank, swing back and dial the vise square, done...
                      You realize you could've plunge cut the needed increase in length via interpolating your position off the end of the slot, right? Since .100 is well under the .125 center line of that .250 end mill.

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                      • #12
                        Shhh, don't tell anyone...

                        Actually, the initial plan was to use a smaller EM as the slot was metric and smaller than 0.250 wide. That would have been touch off on side, crank out, back, over, repeat. But I then decided to just do the 1/4" rather than risk my only remaining "good" 3/16 EM on a bracket that couldn't really be fully stabilized (Z bracket had to be clamped on bottom, milled on top, ~14ga material). And yes, I did plunge it with a 1/4 EM, but alignment by eye was easy over the slot, then crank out to where I wanted (shouldn't really have said "drop in slot and crank for this *specific* job, was more a general comment). Resetting square with the rotary base took about 1 minute or less. Just quick-n-dirty...
                        Last edited by BadDog; 06-30-2009, 06:51 PM.
                        Russ
                        Master Floor Sweeper

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                        • #13
                          Not moving it at all would've saved you 5 mins.


                          I hear ya about the original intentions though. I've done more than my share of "this'll only take a second" and 20 mins later you're still working on it.

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                          • #14
                            Yeah yeah, hindsight is a wonderful thing.
                            Russ
                            Master Floor Sweeper

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by philbur
                              Fit the rotating base when you need it. Leave it on the shelf the rest of the time, simple.
                              Works for me too. Added benefits are the vise is lighter to move around, and increased clearance under the spindle.

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