Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OT - What can you do with this Motor?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • OT - What can you do with this Motor?

    That weird Dyson guy, has invented a new Motor for his Vacuum Cleaners.

    Tops out at 104,000 RPM.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sciencean...ew-vacuum.html

    Using a 1/16" Dia. Mill, the FPM is only about 1700 feet per minute.

    Tom M.

  • #2
    That's really movin. Hate to see what happens when she gits out of balance.


    ME

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Michael Edwards
      That's really movin. Hate to see what happens when she gits out of balance.


      ME
      You buy another vac, that's what.
      This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
      Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
      Plastic Operators Dot Com

      Comment


      • #4
        Oh MY GOD!

        I wonder if that has any interest for us... Grinders
        ?

        Comment


        • #5
          I'd be afraid of burnng anything I tried to grind or polish with something going that fast.

          Ken.

          Comment


          • #6
            Does it include a Kevlar jacket to contain the shrapnel when the impeller decides to spit the bit?
            I just need one more tool,just one!

            Comment


            • #7
              Interesting... But the hype is a little overblown...... it ain't that new.

              There is a "switched reluctance motor" in every Maytag Neptune washer...... Emerson made it originally, and it has been in that product since day one, 10+ years ago....... They pushed the type for a while, but it went out of style for various good reasons.

              Evidently it has been "rediscovered".

              They do have some advantages for high speed, no rotor windings, for one thing, but have a downside as well, since tehy are less efficient, usually, and
              1601

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by J Tiers

                They do have some advantages for high speed, no rotor windings, for one thing, but have a downside as well, since tehy are less efficient, usually, and
                Dammit has JT been abducted by the Dyson development staff for blowing the gaff ?

                Read here later to get the latest update in the missing JT saga.

                .
                .

                Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                Comment


                • #9
                  100k rpm isn't that high. Plenty of small DC motors will do that easily.

                  A related motor is the variable reluctance stepper which can turn at very high step rates. It has no magnets and the rotor is simply a piece of iron with slots in it. The vanes are attracted by a multiphase rotating field in the stator coils. They are at least three phase but can be more. They have a very high step angle resulting in a very low number of steps per rev. I built a flat bed plotter with some back in the '80s that used 12 step per rev VR steppers and it would do over 3 inches per second with a minimum step size of .001 inch. That's over 180 inches per minute over 20 years ago. It's also 3000 steps per second that I generated from hand coded machine language driver software.

                  That's 15000 rpm and while it could do that I had to slow it way down to actually plot anything. Plotting characters at that rate it would try to shake itself to pieces faster than a helicopter.
                  Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The "switched" vs "variable" reluctance motors are quite similar, and only a motor geek really cares about the difference.

                    The good thing is that with no windings, there is nothing to fly off, or "birdcage" on the rotor.

                    A great many integral motor internal grinding spindles have been made over the years wich turn at well over 100k rpm.

                    It's hardly a stretch to turn 10x the rpm of a large turbojet, when the device is apparently about 1/30th the diameter, or less. But marketing departments must earn their keep.

                    Dyson has a rep to keep up, and "breakthrough tech" is apparently their "marketing hook line", used at all opportunities. Floor cleaners are not exactly the place to search for cutting edge technology, usually, although Dyson seems to apply known technology effectively
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I think there is some bogus info there

                      A commercial airliner engine turning only 10,000 RPM. or is that just the Turbo-fan on the front?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Actually I think the various stages of a jet acft engine turn at multiple speeds. So it's not really too meaningful to speak of a jet engine rpm.

                        I may be wrong. Maybe someone else can correct me or elaborate further.
                        Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Most are two stage, a high rpm high pressure gas generator stage and a low pressure low rpm propulsion stage that turns the fan. The shafts run inside of each other and in the hot end is the low rpm turbine that turns the bypass fan at the front. Modern turbojets aren't really jets, they are ducted fan engines with a turbine power plant. The great majority of the thrust comes from the fan which is really just a propeller with a lot of blades in a shroud.

                          Rolls Royce has some three stage turbines I think but turbine designers hate gears since they always wear out faster than any other part.

                          Pure jets haven't been used on commercial aircraft for decades as they are extremely loud and inefficient. One of my favorite pure jet aircraft is the Vulcan Bomber, also known as The aluminium Overcast. Note the very small size of the engine exhausts. A pure jet has no bypass fan and relies only on the heating and acceleration of the gasses passing through the engine itself.

                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Only two or three stages huh? I thought they had more than that, like maybe 5 or 6.

                            To me one of the biggest (and best appreciated) advancements in aviation is how they've quieted down aircraft engines over the years. In 1966 I was attending school at San Jose State, and lived pretty close to the traffic pattern there, which was very busy. You almost couldn't carry on a conversation outdoors much of the time. Now I live about 7 or 8 miles from the airport, but right under the approach path to the prevailing runway, and rarely notice anything other than the heavy military or the occasional fighter/trainers overhead.
                            Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              When I say stages I'm not talking about the number of wheels but the two main sections of the engine. The fan drive has only two wheels, the power wheel in the hot section and the bypass fan up front.

                              To me one of the biggest (and best appreciated) advancements in aviation is how they've quieted down aircraft engines over the years.
                              That is entirely due to the use of high bypass engines. It's a very important byproduct of the fact that the hot, turbulent exhaust is encased in cool laminar airflow. The mass of the bypass air and the velocity difference prevents efficient transfer of sound laterally. It's basically a transparent muffler. Engines are rated by the horsepower and the bypass ratio. The bypass ratio is calculated based on the weight of the air in lbs. A high bypass engine may propel as much as 6 to 8 times (I could be out of date on that number) as much air via the fan as from the exhaust of the turbine so it really is a fan jet engine. They are using this type of engine in military engines now also although much more compact of course. They get far better gas mileage than a pure jet.
                              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X