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Carbide insert descriptions

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  • #31
    Hmmm... Not what I would have expected. The illustration clearly shows what I thought was happening at the nose of the insert, but the same thing should be happening along the side of the insert. I visualize a step being cut into the side of the work as the insert does its' job. I'm surprised there isn't some requirement /consideration for the effective back rake along the side of the insert ie, the "riser" of the step being formed as the insert cuts.

    Again, intuitively for me, it would seem that the side of the tool's geometry would have more effect on chip flow than the nose as the feed is along the axis and not a plunge feed like a form tool. Most HSS tools I use are ground to a point and the tip has little to do with chip flow.
    Last edited by camdigger; 07-14-2009, 02:54 PM.
    Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

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    • #32
      Originally posted by camdigger
      it would seem that the side of the tool's geometry would have more effect on chip flow than the nose as the feed is along the axis and not a plunge feed like a form tool. Most HSS tools I use are ground to a point and the tip has little to do with chip flow.
      A CCMT toolholder has 5° side clearance: if you look down on the insert from the top of the toolholder, the insert is rotated 5° towards the headstock -- it's a single-point cutting tool. So the chip should be flowing over the tip, across the land, and down into the chipbreaker, like the diagram shows.

      Most CCMT inserts don't have that flat land, which I think is what's screwing you up...

      Edit: here's a picture I just drew that shows how a chipbreaker with a flat land can interfere with the insert rake angles. Until you take a DOC deep enough that the chip passes the flat land, you effectively have a flat-topped insert:

      Last edited by lazlo; 07-14-2009, 03:36 PM.
      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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