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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by SHADOW


    Clisby Lathe, 2" chuck, 6" rule stuck to bed.


    Lathe in original Box, foam packed around acessories when closed.


    One of the things to consider when doing machining other than in a home shop is swarf. It tends to go everywhere. You don't want to upset the housekeeper. A helpful containment strategy is to machine inside a clear plastic cleaners bag. This small lathe by virtue of the DOC generates MILES of very fine continuous strands, a situation that can be assisted by doing preliminary cutting at home.
    Another thing that appears is the number of small items needed to accompany it. Drills bits (fractional & number), taps & dies, files, saw, oil, specialty tools (slotting saws, dovetail cutter, boring tools), etc carried in another toolbox.
    I chose a Proxxon rotary tool as it uses the same 12v power supply as the lathe. It has speeds to 18k collets or adjustable chuck, and with a steel collar it goes in a holder at spindle height bolted to the cross slide. It is very light weight.
    The lathe offers a number of shop made tooling opportunities of it’s own as a limited number of accessories are available for it. It doesn't turn axles for quarry trucks but capable of real work in small scale to ward off those machining withdrawls on long trips on the road. I'm still in the process of settling on a baseboard other than a thin plywood base.

    Very good idea about using a plastic bag to keep the mess localized.

    Anyone with any other ideas as to containing the mess?

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  • Weston Bye
    replied
    Back a few years ago I built a new house in town and moved away from my 13 acres and 24 x 40 pole barn. The new house was built with a 14 x 16 shop between the house proper, and the garage. I went into the move with the idea that I wouldn't be getting any large machinery and resolved to build within the capabilities of the benchtop machines I had. Some of the examples can be seen in the Machinist In Motion videos. (Quartz Movement, Walking Beam, Geneva Mechanism)

    The shop could be much smaller still if it didn't also serve as material storage, library, archive, computer room, and junk accumulator. Surprisingly, I still have about as much usable working area as I did when I had the pole barn. I am just carrying less inventory. (my childern are grateful - less for them to dispose of)

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  • oil mac
    replied
    I have enjoyed the various thoughts guys, and hope you like my two cents worth, (sometimes one can go round in a circle &come back to the beginning !) 55 years ago, i went to an evening class, and took the opportunity to make mum a brass shovel ,tongs, steel poker, nice brass brush holder all on a brass stand for the fireside For the completion of this project, i used an old Colchester Bantam lathe (circa 1920) I always had fond memories of that old machine ,Last week a friend found me its sister, in spite of her age nearly mint condition, Whoopee, i feel 15 year old again, But rearranging my shop and fitting it in has made me ponder on my mortality, Lay not away treasures on earth ! Recently i downsized my shop a bit, at 70 years of age, I know i wont go on for ever
    However, Back to all those years ago, Some three years after using the first old Colchester lathe, parents moved to a tenement flat, and i purchased an old beat up 3&1/2" centre height lathe, and dad and i set up a cupboard workshop, We were in buisiness and independant of any outside influences This shop continued till i left home to get married about eight years further on,
    Regarding the "closet shop", It was a source of fun, and a challenge to get round making things in the confined space, and lack of equipment, every penny in those days was a prisoner, sometimes i think when one is struggling there is more of a challenge, If like some of todays guys i know, who have every aid to inconvenience, Is it still a hobby? Two of them were lecturing to a group of folk and i went along to earwig, and they were saying their home shop was valued about £40,000 pounds, to build a few model locomotives Is that still a hobby? However to each their own
    If some of you are like me, i am a machine tool enthusiast, and i am still using the little travelling head shaper dad purchased for me all those years ago, for the closet workshop
    Maybe towards the end of my days, I will have to go back to a little closet workshop in the corner of a smaller house-- God Willing It will be a situation of "horses for courses" Who knows what fate has in store for one

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  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Not decrepit or senile - yet (I hope!!)

    Originally Posted by oldtiffie
    All I am hoping for is a few weeks to destroy everything in the shop and reduce it to scrap and dispose of it.

    We don't need any of the funds - or trauma - of a sale, as we are adequately provided for - either together or singly.
    Originally posted by lazlo
    Mick, have you considered donating your equipment to a school? I'm sure there are some local vo-ed schools that would love to have it?

    Or, barring that, arrange to have the machinery auctioned off, and donate the proceeds to your favorite charity?
    I've thought of that too Lazlo, but other than "new" stuff that was bought by the "vocational" schools and colleges, a lot of donated stuff just either "gets lost", or is "borrowed" or "stored off-site" (long term) or just used as basic stuff. I know of a couple of people who explored that route "in confidence" and had a surprising number of people who "knew" or had "heard" about it. Not for me/us.

    Auctioning is "out" for reasons given previously.

    Originally posted by loose nut
    I think the "shop in a closet" idea isn't a necessity but an example that if one has to down size it is still possible to have a hobby, maybe not in the most desirable form but a still useful one.

    As for calculating out how many good years one might have left, forget it, the only good way to look at life is to think you are going to live forever and plan for it in that manner, why else do 70 and 80 year old people go back to school when they might not live long enough to graduate.

    Just cause we get old isn't a good reason to quit living, that the surest way to end up in the ground fast. Just keep your mind active and your body moving, if you have to move out of your house and shop then adapt.

    It ain't over till it's over.
    I will have no trouble but will have the resources to change hobbies if and when the time arrives.

    I am not calculating how long I have to live or my condition/s in the meantime as definitive quantities - I am just assessing the risks and probabilities in my specific case on a regular basis.

    My wife and I live a very good life - and pretty well live it to the full - and intend to keep doing what of it we can for as long as we can. We will make such "adjustments" as are required as needs arise. We could "go on" as we are from say tomorrow or until we are 100 - or any time in between. The shop will "stay" as long as I have a use for it.

    I am not a moralist or a fatalist, but I do hope that I am realistic and pragmatic.

    If all goes well - and I/we hope that it does - we will be here doing as we want for as long as we can.

    We are very "happy in our skins".

    So, the shop is intended to be used and the contents added to as and if required until - for what-ever reason/s - I can't continue to use it as a machine shop. It may well be partly or progressively emptied and "re-stocked" for a future use or hobby. But I won't be hanging onto too much "just in case" and/or for "sentimental" reasons.

    With a bit of luck, we will be in reasonable shape and I will be using my shop for a while yet.

    There is plenty of drawer-space, bench/work-space and shelving in the shop and so there is no need for "closet-space" in the shed or the house, but I do have a lot of "other stuff" in the house.

    So, unless I/we have a run of really bad luck and/or do something really stupid, there is a pretty reasonable chance that we will be doing pretty well within our capacity to cope for quite a while yet.

    Or perhaps I am decrepit and senile already but don't know it - I hope not.

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  • rantbot
    replied
    Originally posted by oldtiffie
    We both see our General Practitioner every 2 weeks - without fail. Have been doing it for years. We get excellent service and any and every test and service that is needed. None of it costs us a cent out of pocket. Specialists and Private Hospital will cost my wife a mininal amount for the very best of care. I pay nothing as I am a Veteran.

    Drugs/prescriptions are about US$4.30 each. So we should have as good a chance and fore-warning as any - but no absolute certainty.
    Pure fantasy. I'm two decades younger than you but have had two heart attacks. You can take it from me - they hit with no warning, and no test will show that they're on the way. The medical establishment still has no idea why I had them, as I fit none of the standard profiles for at-risk patients. But they happened nonetheless.

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  • loose nut
    replied
    I think the "shop in a closet" idea isn't a necessity but an example that if one has to down size it is still possible to have a hobby, maybe not in the most desirable form but a still useful one.

    As for calculating out how many good years one might have left, forget it, the only good way to look at life is to think you are going to live forever and plan for it in that manner, why else do 70 and 80 year old people go back to school when they might not live long enough to graduate.

    Just cause we get old isn't a good reason to quit living, that the surest way to end up in the ground fast. Just keep your mind active and your body moving, if you have to move out of your house and shop then adapt.

    It ain't over till it's over.

    Leave a comment:


  • lazlo
    replied
    Originally posted by oldtiffie
    All I am hoping for is a few weeks to destroy everything in the shop and reduce it to scrap and dispose of it.

    We don't need any of the funds - or trauma - of a sale, as we are adequately provided for - either together or singly.
    Mick, have you considered donating your equipment to a school? I'm sure there are some local vo-ed schools that would love to have it?

    Or, barring that, arrange to have the machinery auctioned off, and donate the proceeds to your favorite charity?

    Leave a comment:


  • oldtiffie
    replied
    On the down-hill run.

    True Jim.

    But all of life is a lottery.

    We both see our General Practitioner every 2 weeks - without fail. Have been doing it for years. We get excellent service and any and every test and service that is needed. None of it costs us a cent out of pocket. Specialists and Private Hospital will cost my wife a mininal amount for the very best of care. I pay nothing as I am a Veteran.

    Drugs/prescriptions are about US$4.30 each. So we should have as good a chance and fore-warning as any - but no absolute certainty.

    At 72 I am well over the top of the hill (83/2 = 42) and accelerating and 30 years into the down-hill run - and I know the risks and the reality of it all.

    Suffice to say that if I get "caught", there are Plans "B" and "C" in place for the contingencies you mention.

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  • S_J_H
    replied
    Tiff, I have always enjoyed reading your posts as you have a wealth of experience and wisdom you share with the board.
    However I strongly disagree with your desire to destroy and or junk your machinery when it is time for your end here.
    I hope you will give this more thought...
    Perhaps a little more trust in your fellow man?
    Steve

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  • JCHannum
    replied
    The other consideration, aside from passing the tools on to someone who might have a real need for them, is that chances are very good that you will not have the opportunity to Dumpsterize them. A stroke, or heart attack for instance can remove you from the equation in a matter of a few minutes, leaving your wife to dispose of the tools.

    My wife has instructions and the name of the auction house I recommend for her to dispose of my belongings. Her only instruction is to allow the kids to sort and take what they want and then get rid of the rest as quickly as possible.

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  • oldtiffie
    replied
    "Junk" - good or bad?

    Well, perhaps its best this way as most of it is "China" stuff with a good smattering of stuff made in OZ, Japan and Europe - and some small stuff made in the USA.

    Not a bit of "good old "Made in the USA iron"" in the shop, so going by some of the comments I've seen here, its all "junk" and "not worth having".

    And who am I to argue?

    So junk it is and junk it will be treated as.

    But junk or not, you may be assured that there will be some pretty good work done - by my standards anyway - with it in the meantime.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by oldtiffie

    I started the shop with a "clean slate" and I intend to finish it the same way.
    Well, I'm certainly glad the folks who used to have my shop tools and equipment did not "think" like that............ I find it utterly incomprehensible. But its your stuff......

    Are you Dinee? Do you plan to die in the shop? If not, I can't imagine the reason for your plan.

    I have an area over my bench where any nameplates etc from what is now "my" stuff are displayed. I like to know the tools were used well by someone before, and I try to continue the tradition.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 07-18-2009, 10:47 AM.

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  • JCHannum
    replied
    Tiff; don't they have auctions in Australia? That is the best way to dispose of a large accumulation of tools and convert it into cash. While they might provide a few tool gloats, they also provide aspiring HSM's or small shops to equip theselves with tooling that would be otherwise out of reach to them.

    Your approach seems short sighted and quite selfish to me. When I go or downsize, my shop will go at auction.

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  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Dead to rights.

    Originally posted by andy_b
    i followed everything you said (and can agree with a good portion of it) until you got here...

    Originally Posted by oldtiffie
    All I am hoping for is a few weeks to destroy everything in the shop and reduce it to scrap and dispose of it.

    We don't need any of the funds - or trauma - of a sale, as we are adequately provided for - either together or singly.

    So - no "closet" shop here.
    is your shop full of stolen government secrets or machines dropped off by aliens? it just seems kind of an odd desire to "destroy everything". it is your equipment to do with as you please and i'm not telling you to do otherwise, or even explain your reasons. i'm just making an observation that it seems odd.

    andy b.
    Andy.

    The last thing I want is an endless parade of people trawling through the shop as it will be impossible to know who is there or what they are doing or intend. I won't know until after the event if something is "missing" or if we are to get a "visit" after dark or when we go out. It will worry my wife stiff and both of us can do without that.

    No matter how it runs, I will have stuff to dispose of and I will need some of the stuff that might have been sold etc. to reduce it to scrap. It will all go into dumpsters.

    I am not interested in selling it at fire-sale prices either for some-one else to make a "killing" from.

    There is no residual value there as I "wrote it all off" as soon as I bought it.

    Its all new or as new - just ordinary shop stuff - nothing special about it at all - but there is a lot of it.

    As I said, while the small amount of money might be "handy" it really is not worth the hassle. I don't really need the money or the trauma - and I certainly don't need a new class of "New best friends" while I am alive nor does my wife when I am dead or unable to cope.

    There will be no "tool gloats" here, nor is anyone in any position to say I "owe them" or that anything was "promised" to them in any way.

    I started the shop with a "clean slate" and I intend to finish it the same way.

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  • ammcoman2
    replied
    A guy I know has his workshop in one room of his apartment. Taig mill, lathe and a drill press. The ancilliary items fill the rest of the room.

    The floor is covered with a large carpet. When I asked him why he would leave a carpet in a workshop, his reply was "it traps all the swarf!"

    There is a special issue book available from the publishers of MEW on workshops. The UK modellers seem to be able to do amazing work in tiny shops, so there may be some tips in the book on how to cope.

    Geoff

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