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Autocad for the Mac?

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  • #16
    Thanks, I will download that tonight and give it a try.

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    • #17
      Why on earth do you want to run a totally screwed up program like AutoCAD on a perfectly good MacIntosh????? Sounds like a desecration to me.
      Paul A.
      SE Texas

      And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
      You will find that it has discrete steps.

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      • #18
        Autocad lost its charm for me when it wouldn't run in DOS with 386 to the Max and Lotus expanded memory.

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        • #19
          Welcome to the bright side, not the dark side.

          VMware Fusion I like better than Parallels. I have both, if you must run windows on your mac.

          MS Office for the mac is nice, but keep in mind that MS Access is missing from the mac verison. If you only need word and excel they sell a cheaper version for the home.

          As far as cad goes I have a copy of vectorworks installed at work, but have only used it a few times. It is simple to use, and I was comfortable with it with in 1 afternoon of playing around. It is lots of $$ and I will never use its full potential, but for simple 2d stuff I am happy with it.

          I need to find a nice 2d cad program for use at home also, as I do not want to buy a personal copy of vectorworks.

          Dale

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          • #20
            qcad is a nice 2D cad package for $39.00

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Pherdie
              I have both Parallels and Fusion (on two different, his and hers, Mac/Intel machines). I highly prefer Fusion. Much more seamless, free updates and seemingly more preferred by most.
              Agreed. I've used both extensively, and Parallels used to be faster, but flakier. Now they're both about the same speed, but I find VMWare to be much more stable.

              That being said, I ran into major vector video problems attempting to run an R/C flight simulator in a Fusion supported Windows Vista image. If I use Bootcamp and boot directly into Vista, the simulator software runs great, but I lose the ability to jump at will between OS's. The video issue is not unique to the software I was attempting to use. VMWare says it Apple's fault (insert finger pointing here).

              Bottom line, if your going to run specialized graphic intensive Windows software on a Mac, check to see how other Mac users have fared first
              Until recently, VMWare and Parallels didn't support DirectX or 3D acceleration at all. What Fusion does is to pull-in a OpenGL->DirectX translation layer into MacOS. So there's going to be a performance hit, and functional compatibility will not be 100%.

              Ironically, neither VMWare or Parallels supports OpenGL acceleration, so Solidworks is slow in a virtual machine, for example.
              "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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              • #22
                Originally posted by macona
                Windows does not run under emulation through the virtualization. There is nothing to emulate. It is running code native to the processor.
                It's not emulating code, but each virtual machine requires the hypervisor to unload a bunch of architectural and microarchitectural state when you switch virtual machines (if you click from a PC window to a native window, for example). And the Hypervisor has to intercept and check each virtualization trap: each system call, IO, screen draw, disk access, keyboard access...

                So on average, running anything in a virtual machine incurs about a 20% performance hit, depending on how many virtualization traps the program is generating. VT hardware acceleration (Vanderpool Technology), can reduce that down to the 5 -15% range.

                Safari 4 has some of the fastest load times for web pages.
                Safari is a lot faster than Firefox, Opera and IE 8. No ad blocker though

                Quality of hardware is just as good as a mac if you choose to pay for it.
                It's hilarious when people argue Mac versus PC hardware. It's the exact same hardware from Intel -- same CPU, same chipset. The Mac has an additional TPM encryption chip to prevent you from booting anything else on it, but that's the only difference.

                No one has cracked the TPM, but they've kludged MacOS to run on vanilla PC hardware by hand-editing the MacOS .DLL's to physically remove the calls to the TPM. I wouldn't wish that on anyone

                By the way Microsoft Office for Mac is excellent, but no Outlook or Access.
                Outlook is the only reason I need a virtual machine on my airbook
                "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                • #23
                  I have been using this at work for years now.http://www.engsw.com/Just upgraded to powercadd 8 two months ago after getting a new Macbook. It will import and export DXF, DWG, etc etc. They used to have a demo for free.
                  It's not cheap but they have great customer service.
                  Ted

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by lazlo
                    It's hilarious when people argue Mac versus PC hardware. It's the exact same hardware from Intel -- same CPU, same chipset. The Mac has an additional TPM encryption chip to prevent you from booting anything else on it, but that's the only difference.
                    You can run Windows on Mac hardware without a hypervisor.

                    By the way Microsoft Office for Mac is excellent, but no Outlook or Access.
                    Outlook is the only reason I need a virtual machine on my airbook
                    I understand that Snow Leopard will have richer compatibility with MS Outlook. Microsoft does not make it easy to be interoperative. Sometimes I get the idea they'd like to have the whole pie

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by dp
                      You can run Windows on Mac hardware without a hypervisor.
                      You can dual-boot (run boot-camp). But any virtual machine must have a hypervisor, with the associated 20% overhead, flakey graphics acceleration, etc.
                      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                      • #26
                        Lazlo wrote:
                        By the way Microsoft Office for Mac is excellent, but no Outlook...
                        Have you seen this?

                        http://www.apple.com/macosx/exchange.html

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Pherdie
                          Right, that's what Dennis was mentioning -- I'm really looking forward to Exchange Server support (what most corporate mail servers use).
                          "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                          • #28
                            Lazlo wrote:
                            Right, that's what Dennis was mentioning -- I'm really looking forward to Exchange Server support (what most corporate mail servers use).
                            Sorry, I see it now. Missed it in the heat of emotional posting

                            Fred

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Pherdie
                              Sorry, I see it now. Missed it in the heat of emotional posting
                              Sorry Fred, I didn't mean it like "Duh." -- I meant it like "I'm really looking forward to native support for Exchange Server!"

                              Jaguar/Leopard is a gorgeous GUI, but I really have a hard time flipping back and forth between Linux, Windows and Leopard. The context-sensitive menus warp my brain
                              "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by lazlo
                                You can dual-boot (run boot-camp). But any virtual machine must have a hypervisor, with the associated 20% overhead, flakey graphics acceleration, etc.
                                Earlier you posted
                                the Mac has an additional TPM encryption chip to prevent you from booting anything else on it, but that's the only difference.
                                and I didn't understand what you meant. The Mac hardware does not prevent installing other OS's. Mac OS won't run unmodified unless that hardware chip is present.

                                Another problem area for MS Office on the Mac is the lack of VB support in Excel. I rarely have a need for Office - generally when someone sends me an Office (proprietary format ) file.

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