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What to soak 1-2-3 blocks in to neutralize rust?

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  • What to soak 1-2-3 blocks in to neutralize rust?

    A friend gave me 8 1-2-3 blocks that had heavy rust on them, not everywhere, but bad enough. I sand blasted them and then was able to pick 6 that would grind to usable condition.

    I have one side left to grind and now need to soak them when done to stop or control the rust. I was planing to soak them in kerosene for months hoping they would soak the kerosene into the rust that may remain in the drilled holes that the blasting did not get.

    Sooo, give me some ideas to pick from.
    It's only ink and paper

  • #2
    Carl, I'm a big fan of Evap-O-Rust, which is some kind of chemical chelating agent that dissolves the rust off without harming the underlying metal (it doesn't convert good steel to an oxide layer like phosphoric acid does).

    It's relative inexpensive at Harbor Freight.
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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    • #3
      That sounds good since I have already ground the outer surfaces. There is some heavy pitting on the ground surfaces but in small areas that won't affect the use of them. I do want to stop the rust from causing more trouble. If I have to keep them soaking until I die and only pull them out to use them I would not mind but I would rather not have to do that.

      I will do a google for Evap-O-Rust.

      Any other ideas?
      It's only ink and paper

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      • #4
        Use phosphoric acid

        I used simple phosphoric acid to treat an old Bridgeport vice I was refurbishing and it worked great. Bought it from Lowes. Any rust is converted to a phosphate and is very similar if not the same thing as Parkerizing on gun barrels. Very long lasting as well. Have a look:

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parkerizing

        http://www.metalmelter.com/rust/page1.html

        I think a set of blocks with that coating would be awesome
        "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" Thomas Edison

        Better to have tools you don't need than to need tools you don't have

        73's KB3BFR

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        • #5
          $20/gallon. Use the perpetual 20% off coupon:

          http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=96431

          "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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          • #6
            If there is an advance Auto parts nearby they carry a phosphoric acid based remover that works really well, does so quite rapidly and is the best thing I have found, about $6 for a 32 OZ. bottle. I use this stuff on just about anything that rusts because it not only removes the rust but leaves a rust resistant coating.

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            • #7
              Re: rust

              Carl...Have you ever used Kroil? I have had pretty good luck with it on badly rusted parts. It seems to turn rust into mush, which is easily removed. When removed, it does not rust up badly as untreated stuff does. Just my opinion, FWIW.
              Jim (KB4IVH)

              Only fools abuse their tools.

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              • #8
                I got 5 B&S setup parallels, each 1x2x12. They had been left in a storage room, and while still in pretty decent shape, they had some blotches of rust. They were being placed in a scrap bin when I found them (along with some other goodies). I paid what the scrapper was going to pay and brought them home. Put them in a long plastic pan I keep on hand for just such occasions, added a 5:1 mixture of Phosphoric Acid (in the form of common Concrete Etch) and let simmer for about 20 minutes. Rust gone, other material seems untouched and is dimensionally as accurate as I am capable of measuring. After dry and wipe down cleaning, I then wipe with "oily rag" to apply a light R&O oil and let sit a bit. Finally wipe with clean rag (still leaves very light oil film) and place in cabinet with felt lining sprayed with rust preventative for just that purpose (long long ago, still seems to work well).
                Russ
                Master Floor Sweeper

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                • #9
                  There's not much rust left, just what I couldn't bust loose inside the holes. The surfaces are ground now and the pits on the surface is what I need to control because the rust may spread.

                  I have read some posts that the phosphoric acid may turn the metal blackish, is that true and does that stop future rust?

                  I am leaning toward the Evap-O-Rust but it would take two life times to use a gallon up. Maybe not.
                  It's only ink and paper

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                  • #10
                    The Phosphoric acid is the active agent in rust "converters" that both dissolve rust and change any remaining to a rust resistant coating, not rust proof but certainly much better than just bare steel. The Phosphoric acid will stop rust from forming and/or growing in any pits where there may be some remaining and it does indeed work as advertised, it has been around in one form or another for many years (OSPHO being the most popular form) and is used in industrial applications and also is quite popular for auto body work.

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                    • #11
                      I'm a great fan of the electrolytic rust removal process, simple and quick

                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5I5WBG5HPw

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Steelmaster
                        I'm a great fan of the electrolytic rust removal process, simple and quick

                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5I5WBG5HPw
                        If you can't find the arm and hammer washing soda, hit the local pool supply and pick up the Ph plus Sodium Carbonate

                        http://www.rickswoodshopcreations.co...st_Removal.htm
                        http://antique-engines.com/electrol.asp
                        http://www.fordmuscle.com/forums/oth...ctrolysis.html

                        And for the odd time that you need to match that rusted pile with the shiny part you just made
                        http://www.rustyiron.com/engines/ele...sis/index.html
                        Glen
                        Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
                        I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
                        All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

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                        • #13
                          Evapo-Rust does indeed work, but something has to be done with the resulting surface or it will rust up again immediately.

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                          • #14
                            In my case, I've seen steel get a gray coating, depending on the alloy. Cast iron also gets that coating. In both cases it's generally easy to remove, though I'm told that it inhibits rust. However, I've had no rust issues with any of the myriad of stuff I've run through a mild acid bath. Then again, I'm in Phoenix, so your mileage may vary.

                            I've used the EvapRust and still got most of a gallon. But it "dies" relatively quickly and costs much more per area "treated" than the Concrete Etching solution. So I save it for very sensitive stuff I'm trying to save. For instance, a Albrecht chuck with rust on the bell and body, but ok inside.
                            Russ
                            Master Floor Sweeper

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                            • #15
                              I think I'll grind one of the two rejects and use phosphoric acid on it to see how it reacts. Maybe that will be the route to take. I don't mind the patina if it looks ok.

                              What amazed me is how square they still are and how well they ground considering.
                              Last edited by Carld; 07-23-2009, 10:54 PM.
                              It's only ink and paper

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