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DIY bearing extractor

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  • DIY bearing extractor

    Nothing profound and meaningful, just a home version of a fairly expensive commercial product.

    I wanted to pull a noisy bearing from the headstock of my lathe, without too much dismantling.
    Took two pieces of M16 studding, estimated the ball diameter in the bearing and turned a partial ball on the end of each piece to that diameter. Necked down to a dia just less than the space between inner & outer races, Then milled two parallel flats so the whole of the end could fit between the races.



    Then tapped each into the bearing 180 degrees apart (needed a bit of force to distort the ball cage), the twisted them by 90 degrees within the bearing, and mounted on a stock puller beam.



    Worked a treat, there was quite a bit of grunt needed to get the bearing moving.

    The alternatives would have been some fairly major dismantling, or drifting the bearing out from within the headstock at awkward angles with the danger of damaging other parts even if it were possible to do.

    Tim

  • #2
    Very good idea, thanks JIM
    jim

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    • #3
      Replacement

      An excellent procedure. Did you use a ball turning tool to achive the ball shape ends on the M-16?
      Also, how will the new bearing installed? Jim

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by JBL37
        An excellent procedure. Did you use a ball turning tool to achive the ball shape ends on the M-16?
        Also, how will the new bearing installed? Jim
        Yes to the ball turning tool.
        New bearing pulled into place by screwing in the retaining plate.


        Tim

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        • #5
          That's better than my slide hammer version.

          will remember yours for the future ..thanks Tim .

          I built it for extracting blind bearings in a gearbox .. i never got to try it out ..as some guys told me, all I had to do was pour boiling water on the back of the housing ..
          which i did ..and the bearing just fell out,

          so it's sat in the drawer for 2 years .





          all the best.markj

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          • #6
            nice idea
            please visit my webpage:
            http://motorworks88.webs.com/

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            • #7
              Hmmm, cool idea. very clever indeed.
              It's only ink and paper

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              • #8
                I pull bearings out of chainsaws and cutoff saws with a similar tool to that. It was a special OEM tool... but can remember where it came from. Sure saves a lot of time in breaking down the entire engine to replace a bad clutch side crank bearing.

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                • #9
                  That's sure worth remembering, can also think of more then a few occasions that it would have been an extreme time saver.

                  Good job!

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                  • #10
                    Very crafty, I like it.

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