Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Painting a Clausing 4900 10x24 Lathe

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Painting a Clausing 4900 10x24 Lathe

    Hi Guys I have a stupid question about painting my beauty? This lathe was given to me by my mentor!!. An 88 year young machinist named Santo from back east. He started out his carrier during the depression and taught himself everything he knows today. I just wished that I could become a fraction of the man he is today. I just got a late start with this in life. I do wish to convey to all of you professionals what a wonderful group of people you are and anyone should be considered lucky to have this kind of support. Again please except my heart felt thanks for all that you great folks do for us newbies. I just wish I could upload these pictures of my lathe??. Anyway it appears that someone has attempted to paint over the original paint and it didn't take to well. While I was sanding on the covers and chip pan I used compressed air to blow off the dust and low and behold the paint blew off with the dust!!. So I just started to peel it off with compressed air. My question is when I'm ready to paint I found some Rusoleum paint from Home Depot for industrial machines and primer that are oil based. What would you clean it off with so that the new paint will stick???. After the final sanding and masking do you clean it off with thinner?. Just thought I would ask the experts before I restore my beauty. Thanks Allan

  • #2
    I have always painted my machines with acrylic enamel, spray not brush.
    After stripping the paint with a good aircraft quality stripper I would usually bead blast everything, wipe it down with thinner until the rag is clean and procede to my fiberglass work. When the glass work is done a good coat of epoxy primer followed by a heavy coat of polyeyster spray fill to fill in the scratches and pin holes. Just like doing body work on a car. When I was satisfied with the finish I would procede to the paint.
    Hope this is of some help.

    Comment


    • #3
      paint

      You could use Good Quality water base outdoor house paint --

      Before you guys laff at my suggestion _
      I was a Custom Car- Motorcycle painter for over 12 years-

      I have painted well over 500 cars trucks airplanes and motorcycles-

      I have painted several cars spraying House paint and
      they came out Really nice --
      Much much better than I expected -

      The new trend in auto painting is water base paints also --
      I have not used any of them yet tho -

      I have a Bridgeport mill that looks perty ruff and I am going
      to paint it using house paint in the next week or so and I will post
      a picture when its done--It is likely I will have the only
      purple Bridgeport in the US --LOL--Jay--

      Comment


      • #4
        Groovy
        I am not trying to bust your comments, but I don't think that
        custom cars, or houses get the same abuse that mills get
        along with the solvents and oils. Please post your results when you paint your machines, as it may be the wave of the future ??

        JoeLee nailed it in my opinion, as I use either a good machinery enamel, or acrylic based enamel.
        You want hardness to resist cuts from sharp chips and not allow liquids to penetrate

        Rich

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Rich Carlstedt
          JoeLee nailed it in my opinion, as I use either a good machinery enamel, or acrylic based enamel.
          You want hardness to resist cuts from sharp chips and not allow liquids to penetrate
          I used Polane HS Plus, which is a 2-part isocyanate polyurethane enamel. It's hard as glass, and seems to be immune to chemicals, but unfortunately it's very brittle. I've heard the folks who've used Polane have similar issues, including Don.

          When I paint my Atlas 7B, I'm going to try the marine urethane that several guys in the 10EE forum are using. Goes on with perfect gloss on the first shot, no orange peel or color sanding.
          "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

          Comment


          • #6
            Some folks have had good results with tractor paint, from, of course, Tractor Supply.

            Comment


            • #7
              I'll second the tractor paint. I believe that Vallspar or someone like that makes it for Tractor supply. They sell a hardener/gloss enhancer that is mixed in and that stuff really kicks the paint up. I forgot who it was on this forum, but he did his Monarch in TractorS Kubota orange and it was just stunning.

              Comment


              • #8
                As with any paint job the secret to success in machine tools is about 80% preparation, 20% painting.

                If the previous paint job is flaking off you need to remove it all before you procede. The bond with the ubderlying coating has either failed or was never bonded in the first place. Scrape off as much as you can following the scraper with the shop vac hose to suck up all loose paint. Paint remover is a good idea provided it's methyl chloride based not casitic.

                It sound to me the OP went after his lathe like it was a fence or a barn without sensitive workings. By now it may be prudent to dissassemble the machine to ensure no paint debris, chemicals, or abrasives got into the working parts.

                Once you are down to sound paint, patch prime, blend, and brush paint using foil and masking to protect working parts and bright work from accidental coating. Spraypaining works fine on machine tools but all that masking and clean-up is a huge hassle. A brush is much more selective.

                Let the paint job be neat and soundly applied but not fussy or overly expensive. Remember that a machine tool if properly used abrades away paint in areas of chip-wash. It's a machine tool intended for productive work not a show car kept pretty to impress witless yokels you don't even know.

                I've been in shops were everything is hyper neat and in place, no work is in progress, and so-on until you are forded to the conclusion the guy's hobbu is a pretty shop not to actually make stuff. I admire a shop that's neatly kept, organized, but obviously in use judging from projects in progress and drawings pinned to walls.

                Then there is my shop a sea of chaos and round tuit work. I'm supposed to be a faultless guru but my shop looks like a junkyard. Why izzat?

                Comment


                • #9
                  For inspiration in painting your Clausing check out this post:

                  http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/sho...=clausing+4900


                  Michael

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Slightly OT: but you should NOT use compressed air/duster cans to clean a lathe/mill, it WILL blow chips deeper into the machine into places you don't want. Use a brush and vacuum insted. Yea it won't get perfictly clean, but for anything that needs the extra cleanness (the ways) you wipe down with a way oil soaked rag (cleans ways AND reoils them! bonus)

                    as your taking it all apart and can get all those chips out its a bit of a diffrent matter, but for future refrence avoid the air.
                    Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      i used Ford blue tractor paint from TS with the hardener. had to move half way thru the project so knee and head still are 6 shades of Grey. but the cleaning and adjustments it got while apart were worth the effort. neat is nice but its just going to get beat up. my goal is function.everyone is different though and i really like the looks of a well detailed machine, its just not something I'm willing to spend time on at this point in my life.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Michael Hall
                        For inspiration in painting your Clausing check out this post:

                        http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/sho...=clausing+4900


                        Michael
                        Thanks for the compliments, that is my lathe. I used "Ford Gray" tractor paint form TSC with the hardener, it still took about 2 weeks for the paint to dry super hard though...but my basement is kind of cool also. It has held up very well.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I would vote for either the Tractor Supply paint or an industrial paint from an auto paint store. I use an "aluminum" looking industrial paint on the front bumper of my race car. It's mixed 50% with any decent laquer thinner, sprays easy, sticks good and was cheap at $20 for a quart. Polane and some of the other hard epoxy type paints do chip easy. I'm not familiar with the TS type paint, but if there was a flex agent available you could mix a bit of that in there to maybe give the surface a bit of give. Fex agent is what they put in paint so it sticks to plastic/fiberglass bumpers and moves with the part.
                          Last edited by Falcon67; 09-08-2009, 05:21 PM.
                          Chris
                          Merkel, Tx
                          http://raceabilene.com/kelly/hotrod

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by mototed
                            I'll second the tractor paint. I believe that Vallspar or someone like that makes it for Tractor supply. They sell a hardener/gloss enhancer that is mixed in and that stuff really kicks the paint up. I forgot who it was on this forum, but he did his Monarch in TractorS Kubota orange and it was just stunning.

                            That was mine, and thank you very much for the compliment.

                            Here's the thread if the OP want's to take a look.

                            http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=32615

                            Here's the fresh paint:


                            I've turned a fair bit of Aluminum, Ti and Steel and the paint is holding up well. The only chips in the paint are from dropping the chuck wrench, and a major birds nest of tangled swarf that went whipping around. So far no problems with oil or coolant.



                            Ryan

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X