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Shear for 11 ga stainless

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  • Shear for 11 ga stainless

    What are the chances that the Harbor Freight throat-less shear will cut 11 ga stainless? I bet its a pipe dream.

    Anyhow, I am looking for a way to cut 26+ inches of stainless at a time. The goal is a box without a lid. I had thought about ordering it sheared and welding up all the sides.

    I can use a cutoff tool and ruin my hearing, breathing and vision by the time that I'm done. I can fire up the Henrob torch and burn it but that will make a bit of a chaired edge. I could lay it on the Van Norman and use a slitting saw to cut the stuff. But that seems a bit of a PITA.

    I want to get this job but I need a way to shear/cut this stuff. Any ideas that I'm missing? I could cut the thing in a large blank but I dont think that my brake will bend it. I still have yet to try. Heat the bend area up and quench it? That would make it soft. Maybe......

    Any thoughts? I'm not against buying a chunk of equipment but I'm thinking that what I need is out of my budget.

    rock~
    Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

  • #2
    The HF stuff won't cut it. I've seen stainless cut on a band saw by putting the blade on with the teeth pointing up and the blade speed up in the high wood cutting range. Cuts by friction. Personally, if the cut charge is not prohibitive, I'd buy it sheared to size. Anything that will shear 11ga stainless satisfactorily I would expect to be quite expensive.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by dfw5914
      Anything that will shear 11ga stainless satisfactorily I would expect to be quite expensive.
      I was so spoiled by one of my previous jobs where we cut and bend stainless every day. I could shear just about anything and run it over to the big brake and bend it. Now I'm feeling the loss.

      I'll keep thinking, I know that I can find a way to get it done.

      Thanks rock~
      Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

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      • #4
        I have a HF throatless shear, out in my shop. It works great for 16ga stainless, but you'd be working your butt off trying to shear 11ga.

        If I needed 11ga sheared, I'd visit a local metal distributor who just happens to have a shear that will cut 1/4" steel with ease. It would cost a few bucks, but it's worth it....
        No good deed goes unpunished.

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        • #5
          Sounds like an excuse to buy a plasma cutter
          I just need one more tool,just one!

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          • #6
            I would check around, sometimes I'm surprised that my local steel yard is so eager to get a little work that they are shearing my small orders to size for $10 a sheet.
            It sure is worth that to me just to have it ready to bend and weld as soon as it hits the door.
            "Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not."~ Thomas Jefferson

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            • #7
              My brother has a plasma cutter....I drool every time I have to cut heavy gage steel with my shear...knowing he can write his name on a razorblade, cut a beer can in half, without disturbing the beer, and so many other things I only wish I could do.
              No good deed goes unpunished.

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              • #8
                We used to run a Doall band saw at max speed to friction cut stainless, 1/8" would work. About 20" per minute feed rate.

                Don't bother to heat 1/8" SS to bend it, won't work. By the time you get it out of the oven, and to the bender, or off the torch, it will have regained full strength.

                My HF (type) throatless shear would never do 2' of 1/8" anything but Al.

                Order it to size if you can.

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                • #9
                  Hmmmm. the only method I havent heard here is jigsaw.. they do have new carbide tiped and 'abrasive' blades that just might do the job.. Maybe worth a test cut at least, though I think those blades are like $5~10 each.. so after burning through a blade or two its probley cheaper to just get it professionaly sheared. then again, those carbide blades just might last the distance.. or the abrasive matrix ones.

                  If anyone has any good reasons why not iv love to hear them. Personaly with bimetal metal cutting blades my experiances cutting mild steel with the jigsaw have been sad at best, but then I havent tryed it that much, and not since I got a jigsaw that goes really slow (last time was a 2 speed dewalt jigsaw..), but I believe results could be quite diffrent if given the right SFM and blade type.
                  Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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                  • #10
                    Given the tools you have I would recomend the Henrob,,, Put the little wheels on and use a straight edge. Practice some, get a feel for it...
                    I have one also it does a nice job , but my skills are not up to what the torch is capable of. A shear that could handle 11 ga. stainless would not be a cheapie. Best would be to order it cut as needed .

                    GO BUCKS! ( it is an oHIo thing)
                    scariest thing to hear " I am from the government and i am here to help"

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                    • #11
                      A Henrob or other Oxy/act torch will weld stainless,but not cut stainless.
                      I just need one more tool,just one!

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                      • #12
                        Send it out- to a big shear, or a plasma cutting or waterjet house.
                        Or use a plasma cutter, with a piece of angle iron clamped on for a guide.
                        Or use an .040 cut disc in a 4 1/2" grinder- noisy, hot, but not that slow, really.

                        The bandsaws that will do friction sawing are beasts- they have to run at around 20,000 surface feet per minute- depending on the size of saw, that could be as much as 2000 or 3000 rpm. And usually a saw that will do that has a 7 or 10hp motor, weighs 1500lbs to a ton, and, new, costs 20 grand.
                        Most bandsaws wont do this.

                        For shearing, you derate a shear 2 gages for stainless- so, to cut 11ga stainless, a shear should be rated at 9 gage mild steel. Almost 3/16". Thats a big shear.

                        Plasma is the cheapest, most home shop friendly way to go.

                        This is not true, though-

                        "Don't bother to heat 1/8" SS to bend it, won't work. By the time you get it out of the oven, and to the bender, or off the torch, it will have regained full strength."

                        I hot bend, forge, roll, and texture stainless every day. Probably about 10 tons of it in the last 10 years. Works great. I often bend stainless hot on my D&K finger brake- you just heat the bend line with a rosebud, then bend. Usually only up to a foot or so wide, but wider would be possible with more than one rosebud. I hot bend stainless in my hossfeld all the time, its a piece of cake.
                        And if you want to anneal most 300 series stainless, you get it red, then quench immediately in cold water- it gets as soft as its gonna get, which, admittedly, isnt THAT soft. But noticeably softer, especially when cold bending.

                        Everything about stainless, though, is harder, and more expensive. I figure 5 times material cost of mild steel, and double, at a minimum, labor and shop costs. It eats drill bits, grinding wheels, saw blades, and every other consumable, and the tools to work it need to be heavier, more expensive, and higher quality.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by rockrat
                          Heat the bend area up and quench it? That would make it soft.
                          Yea, I used this at work to hand form some small stuff. I just had not worked through the process yet in my head to know if I wanted to try heating up a 2 foot area and dunking it. Also, when we did this at the old shop, the sheets would warp all over.

                          I may just order it up sheared. Will have to see what all the numbers say.

                          Thanks all

                          rock~
                          Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

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