Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

photocopier parts

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • photocopier parts

    I have a module from a photocopier which has three high voltage modules on it. I'm wondering what voltage drives these? I need a source of several thousand volts for some testing I'm doing, and I could use one of these modules if I can make them run.

    They are basically black rectangular things with an output spade lug on top, one is -5.5kv, another is +5.5kv, another is -6.5kv- maybe that will help describe what I have here. I'm hoping they are voltage multipliers which can be driven from the ac line, but I don't know. Another clue- one of the modules has GHB-3 on it, the others I can't read. Any ideas?
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  • #2
    They almost certainly run directly from the mains voltage AC. There isn't a lot of current available, only a few milliamps but you sure don't want to touch the output or get too close to it. They are used to produce a corona on either a thin wire or a saw tooth knife edge which produces a charge on the photoreceptor drum and on the paper as part of the xerographic process.


    I have thought of using one like that to treat PTFE to make it easier to glue. The corona will break down the molecular structure on the surface and create some unattached dangling molecular bonds.

    Those units also generate a lot of ozone when used as intended so you need to be careful about breathing it. Ozone only has a half life of a few minutes so it won't build up but if you are too close to it you can get pretty decent eye and lung irritation.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

    Comment


    • #3
      Darryl I found a bunch of neon sigh transformers at a sonic that they where tearing down 15kv to 12kv. If I remember correctly it takes 10kv to jump a ½ in gap. (Depending on humidity) And they where free just had to dig them out.

      Comment


      • #4
        High voltage transformers -- a novel use.

        A customer that I had used Neon sign transformers to build a large bug zapper to rid his Martin house of unwanted house sparrows. The switch to turn it on was on his porch. When he saw a sparrow go into the nest with the zapper outside it he turned it on. When the bird exited between the electrodes he got zapped. If it didn't kill him, he left with his feathers smoking never to return. This guy had worked in the neon sign business and was familiar with the equipment.
        Byron Boucher
        Burnet, TX

        Comment


        • #5
          Well, I don't know what to say about bug and bird zapping. I'd do it to bugs, but probably not birds. Except maybe crows- yeah, I'd do the crows in. They walk around on my roof every morning and peck at the ashphalt shingles. Now I have some leaks. They're doing in one area pretty good.

          Anyway, I checked further into this circuit board I have with these modules on it. Each one has a ferrite transformer feeding it, so it looks like they require a higher frequency drive than 60 hz. The transformers are about a cubic inch or so in size, so that's a pretty good clue that they need high frequency to deliver any useable power.

          I might be better off digging into a microwave oven and temporarily tapping into the voltage to the magnetron. What I'm doing anyway is building a couple high voltage meters to use for testing these ovens. I'll have to drag my trusty Elavi analog meter to work and use it to calibrate these other meters. It has a 5000 volt dc range on it so it will work for me.

          I would rather have done this at home, but no big deal. Maybe I could bring a transformer, diode and capacitor home, and run the thing off a variac to get a range of test voltages. Yeah, I think that's what I'll do.

          I did discover one thing during my design stage. There's no high voltage flexible wire in my town, so it came down to me making my own. These are for test leads. What I'm doing is using heater cord, the hpn, rubbery covered stuff that toasters, irons, frypans, etc used to use. I strip it into single wires, then talc it up and pull it into flexible tubing I got at a pet store. The tubing is silicon and there's just enough room in it to take the rubber covered wire. I did a test and the combination is still flexible, so now I have a way to build high voltage test leads. I normally use the hpn for test leads anyway, since it is flexible and gives a long service life before the ends start to break off the probes or the bananana plugs. I hate the typical test lead wire that meters come with- that stuff is a joke.

          Ok, so because this is a shop project, I'll post some pics when I'm done with it.
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

          Comment


          • #6
            Hmm. Make up a 555 timer to try driving the HV module.

            For the absolute best wire for things like test leads get your hands on some electric blankets and salvage the wires in them and going to the controllers.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by darryl
              Well, I don't know what to say about bug and bird zapping. I'd do it to bugs, but probably not birds. Except maybe crows- yeah, I'd do the crows in. They walk around on my roof every morning and peck at the ashphalt shingles. Now I have some leaks. They're doing in one area pretty good.

              Anyway, I checked further into this circuit board I have with these modules on it. Each one has a ferrite transformer feeding it, so it looks like they require a higher frequency drive than 60 hz. The transformers are about a cubic inch or so in size, so that's a pretty good clue that they need high frequency to deliver any useable power.

              I might be better off digging into a microwave oven and temporarily tapping into the voltage to the magnetron. What I'm doing anyway is building a couple high voltage meters to use for testing these ovens. I'll have to drag my trusty Elavi analog meter to work and use it to calibrate these other meters. It has a 5000 volt dc range on it so it will work for me.

              I would rather have done this at home, but no big deal. Maybe I could bring a transformer, diode and capacitor home, and run the thing off a variac to get a range of test voltages. Yeah, I think that's what I'll do.

              I did discover one thing during my design stage. There's no high voltage flexible wire in my town, so it came down to me making my own. These are for test leads. What I'm doing is using heater cord, the hpn, rubbery covered stuff that toasters, irons, frypans, etc used to use. I strip it into single wires, then talc it up and pull it into flexible tubing I got at a pet store. The tubing is silicon and there's just enough room in it to take the rubber covered wire. I did a test and the combination is still flexible, so now I have a way to build high voltage test leads. I normally use the hpn for test leads anyway, since it is flexible and gives a long service life before the ends start to break off the probes or the bananana plugs. I hate the typical test lead wire that meters come with- that stuff is a joke.

              Ok, so because this is a shop project, I'll post some pics when I'm done with it.
              Be VERY, VERY CAREFUL with microwave ovens...they have enough current to kill you.

              TMT

              Comment


              • #8
                Appreciate the warning, TMT. In the last week I have repaired about 20 or so nukers and scrapped probably 10. When I go in tomorrow, there's a stack of about 10 that I have to deal with, then the big truckload of ovens comes in. Then there's two of us dealing with them.

                One of the guys at work got a good zap one day. He didn't wait long enough for the cap to discharge, so he became the discharge path. I timed it- takes about 10 seconds for the charge to drain below the point where the voltage can be felt. I'm sure it's not the same for every case, but I'm pretty careful around voltages, and I plan to do this test on several makes and models just to know how soon I can go in and touch things.
                I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Boucher
                  A customer that I had used Neon sign transformers to build a large bug zapper to rid his Martin house of unwanted house sparrows. The switch to turn it on was on his porch. When he saw a sparrow go into the nest with the zapper outside it he turned it on. When the bird exited between the electrodes he got zapped. If it didn't kill him, he left with his feathers smoking never to return. This guy had worked in the neon sign business and was familiar with the equipment.
                  I like it. I have recently moved house and the place Im in now is in an area that is infested with Indian Mynah birds and also Starlings. These are quite a problem in many areas of Australia. They are not native and they actively drive the native birds away, defecate over everything and seem to carry almost their own weight in lice. Lots of different trap designs but the idea of zapping them as they try to get under the ridge capping appeals. Probably some law against though. Apparently its not considered to be humane to gas them (once caught) using exhaust gas but its ok to use Co2.
                  Sorry not trying to hijack the thread.

                  bollie7

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Most of the auto parts stores and all the speed shops sell spark plug wire by the foot. I think Autozone and NAPA carry 7 & 8mm. It's about the best HV wire you can get. I think it's good to over 100Kv. You can get it in resistor (carbon filament) or stranded copper wire core.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The problem with modern spark plug wire is that most of it is carbon core.

                      Go to a sign supply shop and get the real stuff, 15kv rated neon sign wire called GTO-15.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X