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How do I cleanly cut a razorblade?

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  • How do I cleanly cut a razorblade?

    I am making a device that butts two razor blades together, forming a "T". A standard razor blade is too tall and too long, so I want to cut it down. I tried a dremel, and it worked, but it was rough and dicolored the metal, which I don't want. Is this a job for a metal shear? Would it deform the blade (which has to remain completely straight)? Any suggestions? Thanks in advance.

    B2

  • #2
    Being as razorblades are extremely hard as to hold an edge, if you tried to shear one I'm sure that it would just shatter. Your best bet would be to use the Dremel or some type of grinder with a cutoff wheel to cut the blades down close to the size you want. Then make a clamping fixture to hold the piece with a small amount protruding from the edge so that you could hold it up to a sanding disk and grind away the remaining portion. If you were careful with the fixture you would only kiss it when you got down to the finish size. I hope this helps

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    • #3
      If you have access to a surface grinder and a toolmakers vise the job should be fairly simple and the opposing sides would be parallel.
      Lee

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      • #4
        Try scissors.

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        • #5
          If you have a carbide (or diamond) scribe, you might try scoring the blade and then snapping it (in a vise, with safety glasses

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          • #6
            just thinking out loud here but you could try scoring a line with a carbide scriber and then snapping it in half. You could always grind the edge after if it's too rough. hope this helps
            Andrew

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            • #7
              Actually razor blades are not extremely hard,you can shear them with a pair of sharp aviation snips assuming we are talking single edge razors,anything thicker like an exacto blade would be done with abrasives,as for defroming the edge,just use the snips in the normal manner with the waste side of the cut on the off hand side of the blade.
              I just need one more tool,just one!

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              • #8
                I don't know the quantity you want but you may be able to purchase what you want for a reasonable price. Check with one of the blade manufacturers and see what they want for a blade made to your specs. I the past I have gone to manufacturers to see what they would charge for one of their product slightly modified. In several cases they were cheaper than the standard item. Packaging cost run the price up. If you can get what you want in bulk it will be a lot cheaper.

                I think that you could shear them and not have them deform. I may try one tomorrow and see shat happens. I have sheared thin spring stock without any problem.

                Joe

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                • #9
                  Benjamin

                  Try a gullotine type paper shear that is not dull (crisp cutting edges). You could have it cut with a Laser or water jet.

                  In my youth I built a CO2 laser at home that would blast through razor blades. Made it from a (bad) plan in SA ("Amatuer Scientist" column).

                  [This message has been edited by Thrud (edited 09-20-2003).]

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                  • #10
                    Put a fresh sharpen on a pair of scissors, have at it.
                    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                    • #11
                      Thrud,

                      You actually built that laser? Cool. I considered it too. I also always wanted to build the linear accelerator he had in that column. I still have the plans. Never did build it as I figured I wanted to have children.
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                      • #12
                        Thanks, guys. I'll try the shears and let you know how it works out.

                        B2

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                        • #13
                          Benjamin,

                          I cut them before. As others have said, I scored them with a carbide scribe; then supported the side of the razor I wanted to keep as close to the scratched line as I could. I "flexed" the blade with a plier until it cracked. Once cracked, I smoothed the blade with light touches to the grinding wheel until I achieved the precise length wanted.

                          Keep in mind, since they are so hard you might shatter some before you get what you want. One other thing - these blades grind very easy so you don't have to have the scratch line exactly where you want the finished length. When I ground mine, I used a thicker piece of aluminum as a backer plate to act as a heat sink.

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                          • #14
                            Evan:
                            Yup, but lots of modifications so I could experiment with different gases (pretty colours!) - 'course not everything would lase, but WTH. In retrospect it was probably not a high enough vacuum. Made a 500W (gestimate) ruby laser too. That one popped holes in 10Ga. They disappeared during a move from one town to another. My parents got paid for them by the moving company and I got squat (story of my life - at least I have never had a divorce or shotgun wedding - Thank you God)

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                            • #15
                              Thrud, would you happen to have the plans to this laser?
                              Does anyone actually read siglines?

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